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Comment: Re:My (short) experience with git so far (Score 1) 346

by JensR (#26406925) Attached to: Git Adoption Soaring; Are There Good Migration Strategies?

I mixed up "endian" with "end-of-line", and we were working in a mixed Windows/Linux environment. The automatic change to native end-of-line that git does sometimes marked files as dirty, which required an extra commit before I could change back to my feature branch. It's quite possible that that process would've smoothed out over time.

Comment: Re:My (short) experience with git so far (Score 1) 346

by JensR (#26406905) Attached to: Git Adoption Soaring; Are There Good Migration Strategies?

That was mostly because code is sometimes not feature complete, or has some debugging/testing bits left in. We had a code review system in place, and I didn't want to increase the workload of the reviewer to check if any commit undid or modified changes of an earlier commit.

Comment: My (short) experience with git so far (Score 5, Interesting) 346

by JensR (#26397529) Attached to: Git Adoption Soaring; Are There Good Migration Strategies?

I used to use cvs, subversion and perforce. After switching to git, it feels a lot more powerful, at the cost of more things that can go wrong.
My workflow with subversion was:
- regular update: update, check/fix conflicts, continue work
- commit: update, pick files I want to commit with TortoiseSVN, verify the changes in the diff view, write log message, commit, continue work
On GIT:
- regular update: stash my changes, change to master branch, pull, check for errors or dirty files (mostly endian problems), switch to work branch, rebase from master, check for errors or dirty files, unstash my changes, check for errors or dirty files, continue work
- commit: update, stage the files I want to commit, commit them, verify the changes, push
At several stages some obscure thing could go wrong that I needed to look up in the manual or on the internet, or needed to ask someone who used it for longer. That doesn't mean I think GIT is bad, I just feel it takes more time to be fully productive with compared to older systems. And I miss a few minor things from svn, like keyword expansion or properties.

Comment: Re:What's the point of winning ... (Score 1) 507

by JensR (#26286395) Attached to: Avoiding Wasted Time With <em>Prince of Persia</em>

I see where you're coming from, looking at the popularity of cheat cartridges/discs or "trainers" for cracked games there are many people who just want to run through the game without any danger for themselves.
The question is, is it a sign of quality to target those people exclusively? All games are entertainment, but not like a movie they are a game. And part of a game is that you win or loose. Where is the reward for finally completing a risky section, if you haven't failed half a dozen times beforehand? What is worth fixing are unnecessary delays like long loading times to play what should be already in memory or a cutscene you can't skip. But removing the risk means removing the reward as well.

Television

+ - Co-Inventor of the TV Remote Dies

Submitted by poorting
poorting (729531) writes "http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/O/OBIT_REMOTE _CONTROL?SITE=WIRE&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

Co-Inventor of the TV Remote Dies

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Hit the mute button for a moment of silence: The co-inventor of the TV remote, Robert Adler, has died. Adler, who won an Emmy Award along with fellow engineer Eugene Polley for the device that made the couch potato possible, died Thursday of heart failure at a Boise nursing home at 93, Zenith Electronics Corp. said Friday.

In his six-decade career with Zenith, Adler was a prolific inventor, earning more than 180 U.S. patents. He was best known for his 1956 Zenith Space Command remote control, which helped make TV a truly sedentary pastime.

In a May 2004 interview with The Associated Press, Adler recalled being among two dozen engineers at Zenith given the mission to find a new way for television viewers to change channels without getting out of their chairs or tripping over a cable.

But he downplayed his role when asked if he felt his invention helped raise a new generation of couch potatoes.

"People ask me all the time — 'Don't you feel guilty for it?' And I say that's ridiculous," he said. "It seems reasonable and rational to control the TV from where you normally sit and watch television."

Various sources have credited either Polley, another Zenith engineer, or Adler as the inventor of the device. Polley created the "Flashmatic," a wireless remote introduced in 1955 that operated on photo cells. Adler introduced ultrasonics, or high-frequency sound, to make the device more efficient in 1956.

Zenith credits them as co-inventors, and the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences awarded both Adler and Polley an Emmy in 1997 for the landmark invention.

"He was part of a project that changed the world," Polley said from his home in Lombard, Ill.

Adler joined Zenith's research division in 1941 after earning a doctorate in physics from the University of Vienna. He retired as research vice president in 1979, and served as a technical consultant until 1999, when Zenith merged with LG Electronics Inc.

During World War II, Adler specialized in military communications equipment. He later helped develop sensitive amplifiers for ultra high frequency signals used by radio astronomers and by the U.S. Air Force for long-range missile detection.

Adler also was considered a pioneer in SAW technology, or surface acoustic waves, in color television sets and touch screens. The technology has also been used in cellular telephones.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office published his most recent patent application, for advances in touch screen technology, on Feb. 1.

His wife, Ingrid, said Adler wouldn't have chosen the remote control as his favorite invention. In fact, he didn't even watch much television.

"He was more of a reader," she said. "He was a man who would dream in the night and wake up and say, 'I just solved a problem.' He was always thinking science."

Adler wished he had been recognized for more of his broad-ranging applications that were useful in the war and in space and were building blocks of other technology, she said, "but then the remote control changed the life of every man."

© 2007 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy."
Programming

+ - Advanced Perl XML tips using XSLT, SAX, and SQL

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "This article shows you more powerful tools for parsing XML using Perl: DOM-style tree parsers and the SAX event-based parsers. You will learn about XML::SAX::Base and how you can use it to build sources, handlers, and sinks of SAX events. See how to feed transformed parse trees into SAX pipelines, further transform them, and write them as text or to SQL databases. Finally you will learn how to reverse this, using database content to drive SAX pipelines."

Stallman Convinces Cuba to Switch to Open Source 582

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the digital-emissaries dept.
prostoalex writes "It's a big victory for Richard Stallman in North America, as Cuba decided to adopt open source software on the national level. Both Cuba and Venezuela are currently working on switching the entire government infrastructure to GNU/Linux operating system and applications, the Associated Press reports from Havana: 'Both governments say they are trying to wean state agencies from Microsoft's proprietary Windows to the open-source Linux operating system, which is developed by a global community of programmers who freely share their code.' The AP article doesn't mention the distro used for government workers, but says that the students are working on a Gentoo-based distro."
Wii

+ - will wheaton

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "would be nice to see him naked"
OS X

+ - Where's Java 6 for Mac

Submitted by Jari Mustonen
Jari Mustonen (132206) writes "Time to hide your Mac-fanboy hat. Or maybe you are beliver enough to defend Apple even on this one. The question is simple: Where is the Java 6 for OS X? Let the gossips fly and let the slashdot do what it is best at: to summon an anonymous coward from Apple to tell us what is happening and where is my Java? But in the mean time, let's hear your theory."
It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - What's the biggest turn-off for you, the geek?

Submitted by Dystopian Rebel
Dystopian Rebel (714995) writes "new person smokes new person watches TeeVee new person is biased against Flying Spaghetti Monster new person will not bring Cheetos while I am gaming new person says "LOL" in conversation new person says my binary clock is "weird" new person has dated Cowboy Neal I take what I can get, but the Cheetos thing gives pause"

Stupidity, like virtue, is its own reward.

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