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Comment Re:Danger keys (Score 1) 684 684

Caps Lock assists in performance for all the language-specific layouts that rely on it to enter characters. (In these layouts, CAPS state, != SHIFT state; and thus yields a new CAPS+SHIFT state. See: Swiss German, Czech, ]

Others just use it to switch between national language, and latin characters (so caps is more a latin-lock, than caps lock). Which is becoming more required if one wants to type on the Internet which seems to assume that most people have the letters a-z on their keyboard....

Comment Capital Umlauts -- Or, Don't F with the Swiss (Score 1) 684 684

THIS.
Shift + Letter yields --- DIFFERENT Lowercased Letters!
Shift ä = à
Shift ö = é
Shift ü = è

To get uppercased version of any of those letters, you have to turn Caps Lock on.
With CAPS ON:
Shift Ä = À
Shift Ö = É
Shift Ü = È

Comment Re:Caps Lock use (Score 1) 684 684

Use of the caps lock is very common in Switzerland, nad Czech Republic.
Because in many layouts SHIFT != CAPS

Swiss German and Czech; they have four states
NONE; SHIFT; CAPS; CAPS-SHIFT.
shift ü = è
CAPS ON: Shift-Ü = È

Czech: The number row is actually all letters. ; to get the numbers 1234567890; you have to use shift.
Caps Lock: the top row are now uppercased; shift still gets you the numbers.

Some non-latin layouts use CAPS to toggle between national characters, and latin-letters. (so caps lock on, gives lowercase latin-alpha); caps-lock off gives you lower-case cyrillic.

Comment Re:Lenovo X1 Carbon Gen 2 - No Caps Lock (Score 1) 684 684

How would that work in the Swiss (German), or Czech markets?
As Shift and Caps are different states.
Shift-ü = è
CAPS; shift-Ü = È
would that mean, to type Èt, one would have to do [shift, shift, shift-ü, shift, shift], t ?
And for that matter, a Ü would be what [shift, shift, ü, shift shift]
I hope they didn't do that home/end thing in the European markets.

Comment Re:Make it MORE important, not less. (Score 1) 684 684

In other layouts it does different things.
Swiss German and Czech; they have four states
NONE; SHIFT; CAPS; CAPS-SHIFT.
shift ü = è
CAPS ON: Shift-Ü = È

Czech: The number row is actually all letters. ; to get the numbers 1234567890; you have to use shift.
Caps Lock: the top row are now uppercased; shift still gets you the numbers.

In some non-latin based layouts:
Caps-Lock toggles between national script, and latin script (so you can say, type in a URL, or otherwise use the internet that demands usernames be a-z when the letters a-z don't even exist on the keyboard....; people in these markets often allow usernames, passwords, etc in local script; rather than "english letters")

Comment Re:Definitely not the least used key (Score 1) 684 684

So, inconvenience entire countries because US english doesn't use it.

Or what about doing away with the # key, because it's rarely used. (On bristish english keyboards, the # is it's own key. Shift-# = ~; Shift-` (backtick) = (not) )

Several Keyboard layouts have 4 shift states. CAPS !== SHIFT.
See Czech and Swiss German for common examples.

the upper row of CZ are letters.
SHIFT gets you 123457890
CAPS: gets uppercased letters
CAPS-Shift: numbers again

Swiss:
Shift ü = è
CAPS ON: Shift Ü = È

If you get rid of the caps lock, you'll have to introduce a common dual-state key for the dozens of languges that require it.
n other layouts, CAPS switches between national language script, and latin letter script (which is pretty much required now if you ever want to type a URL)

Comment Re:Prime space (Score 1) 684 684

Several Keyboard layouts have 4 shift states. CAPS !== SHIFT.
See Czech and Swiss German for common examples.

the upper row of CZ are letters.
SHIFT gets you 123457890
CAPS: gets uppercased letters
CAPS-Shift: numbers again

Swiss:
Shift ü = è
CAPS ON: Shift Ü = È

If you get rid of the caps lock, you'll have to introduce a common dual-state key for the dozens of languges that require it.
In other layouts, CAPS switches between national language script, and latin letter script (which is pretty much required now if you ever want to type a URL)

Comment Switzerland is a niche environment. (Score 0) 684 684

Niche environments.
Like the country of Switzerland; or the Czech Republic.

Several Keyboard layouts have 4 shift states. CAPS !== SHIFT.
See Czech and Swiss German for common examples.

the upper row of CZ are letters.
SHIFT gets you 123457890
CAPS: gets uppercased letters
CAPS-Shift: numbers again

Swiss German:
Shift ü = è
CAPS ON: Shift Ü = È

If you get rid of the caps lock, you'll have to introduce a common dual-state key for the dozens of languges that require it.

Comment Caps Lock is required (Score 1) 684 684

Several Keyboard layouts have 4 shift states. CAPS !== SHIFT.
See Czech and Swiss German for common examples.

the upper row of CZ are letters.
SHIFT gets you 123457890
CAPS: gets uppercased letters
CAPS-Shift: numbers again

Swiss:
Shift ü = è
CAPS ON: Shift Ü = È

If you get rid of the caps lock, you'll have to introduce a common dual-state key for the dozens of languges that require it.

Comment Re:People with disabilities (Score 1) 684 684

Then there are all the keyboard layouts where
CAPS != SHIFT.
Giving 4 states
NONE (lowercase)
SHIFT (alternate characters, lowercase)
CAPS (uppercase)
CAPS SHIFT (alternate characters, uppercase)

See Czech, and Swiss German for two common examples.
in Czech:
shift-ú = /
CAPS, ú = Ú
CAPS, Shift-ú = /
á í é
SHIFT: 8 9 0
CAPS: Á Í É
CAPS SHIFT: 8 9 0

Comment Re:It's shift for some people (Score 1) 684 684

This is required for some keyboard layouts.
For Example: Swiss German Keyboard Layout.
CAPS is a separate keyboard state.
CAPS ON, Key !== SHIFT+Key

[u-UMLAUT] = [u-UMLAUT]
Shift-[u-UMLAUT] = [e-acute]
CAPS ON, [u-umlaut] = [U-umlaut]
CAPS ON, Shift-[u-umlaut] = [E-umlaut]

Thus, to type capital [e-acute]; one would go: Caps; shift-[u-umlaut]; Caps.
For Capital [u-umlaut]; Caps; [u-umlaut]; Caps.

For other non-latin layouts:
CAPS lock is a toggle between QWERTY and native

This is the same in Czech Layout:
The top row of keys are + e^ s^ c^ r^ z^ y' a' i' e' =
Shift top row = 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 %
Caps: + E^ S^ C^ R^ Z^ Y' A' I' E' =
Caps Shift: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 %

In others, CAPS != SHIFT.
Devanagari: Caps state is ignored, but SHIFT keys change letter selection.
Thus CAPS-O == O (dependant-O); and CAPS-SHIFT-O = SHIFT-O (independent-O)

Comment Re:Because it toggles an LED! (Score 1) 684 684

1. This would be horrible for anyone using some non US-English keyboards;
For Example: Swiss German Keyboard Layout.
CAPS is a separate keyboard state.
CAPS ON, Key !== SHIFT+Key

ü = ü
Shift-ü = è
CAPS ON, ü = Ü
CAPS ON, Shift-ü = È

The Caps Lock key is needed.
Sure, you can always use ALT-GR ', SHIFT-E; but that does get very tiring, if you always need to use four-button, two-keystroke combos to type fundamental letters in your alphabet.

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