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Comment In fact a new version often is how it should be (Score 3, Insightful) 244

Companies should regularly update their products to use the latest tech. There is no reason to freeze a product and not update it for a long time just to make owners feel like they still have the "latest". Rather they should update as often as changes in available technology/manufacturing/etc dictate. Customers then buy new ones as often as they feel it useful.

That's how it has been with desktop computers, excluding Apple, forever. Few, if any, people upgrade every time something new comes out because the changes are usually minor. They buy something, stick with it for a few years, then buy something new when they feel like they want or need it.

The problem is that Apple devices seem to be something that some people wrap their ego in. They feel a need to have the newest device to be "cool" or some such and thus get mad when a newer device comes out that they cannot or do not wish to purchase since they feel it somehow lessens what they do have.

Comment Ya I'm having trouble imagining it (Score 2) 170

Everyone I know, even the cheap types, keeps some kind of wired Internet. It is usually faster than wireless and always cheaper per GB. If you were an EXTREMELY light user I suppose you could go all wireless all the time, but even for the casual user who likes to surf the web on a daily basis and watch cat videos, you'll easily use more data than a wireless provider is interested in letting you have cheap and they'll charge and/or throttle.

Simple example: T-Mobile gives me phone, text, and 1GB of data for $50/month. It would run me $30/month more to get unlimited data (they'll throttle if you get too excessive though). That's for a single device, and gives 7GB of tethering. Speeds are in the realm of 40mbits max, 20-30mbits normally. So that'd work only if your phone is going to be the one-and-only device you use for most things, and do a little surfing on something else. If you want to add a tablet to it you'd be talking adding another line/device which brings it up to about $100/month with 10GB of data per device.

Ok well then having a look at the cable company for about $60/month they'll sell you a 50mbit connection with a 350GB soft cap (meaning if you go over they complain at you and try to upsell you, they don't charge or throttle). You'll really get those kinds of speeds too, pretty much all the time.

That's more money, but not a ton more. Presuming you would have the basic phone plan anyhow you pay about $30/month more than the unlimited or $10/month more than the two devices. With that you get a faster connection, the ability to connect as many devices as you like, enough data to watch Netflix, download games, and so on. Also, you can, of course, upgrade your speed. They'll happily sell you 100mbit or 300mbit for a bit more per month (about $75 and $100 respectively) whereas the mobile speed is what it is.

Not surprising then that all the people I know keep a wired connection. Personally I don't find I need much LTE data, I use WiFi most of the time at work and home, so the 1GB cap is fine for me (more than fine actually) but I need a lot more on another connection. Looking at my usage I used about 350GB last month. Not the kind of thing a wireless provider would be ok with.

Comment Re:Why don't taxis just provide good service?! (Score 1) 135

The medallions avoid a couple things,
- drivers charging on a hail unsafely then haggling over who can carry them
- lots of empty cabs driving around

Gas prices and the expense of operating a vehicle in the city takes care of the second. Taxi companies won't run cabs if they're not making money, so the problem is self-limiting. Medallions only serve to artificially limit supply.

Comment Re:Cool article... (Score 2) 135

One of the reasons Uber, Lyft and all the other "ride sharing" app companies get so much flack because they are breaking the law.

I'd be more sympathetic if 1) Uber and Lyft were offering the same services as taxis (you can't flag down an Uber; you have to request one), and 2) many jurisdictions hadn't already ruled that you're wrong.

Comment Re:Why don't taxis just provide good service?! (Score 3, Interesting) 135

In most jurisdictions the taxi companies have been subject to more rigorous (i.e. expensive) standards than Uber has been following.

...because they paid good money to write those laws. Taxi laws are a prime example of regulatory capture. For example, Company A got a sweet deal on credit card readers and they spent 2 years installing them in their cabs. Then, they tell the local regulatory body that credit card readers are a necessary public good and suggest that all taxis should have readers installed in a reasonable time frame - say, within three months. Finally, they laugh as their competitors scramble to shell out inflated prices for emergency rush orders on credit card readers so that they can stay in business.

For another example, three companies get together for group bargaining with an insurance company: "if you give us a good rate, we'll guarantee that all of our cabs will carry your new expanded coverage." Once that deal's in place, they ask for regulations to require all taxis to carry that level of coverage. Of course, all other companies have to pay the un-negotiated rate and now they have a harder time competing.

You don't get to write the laws and then bitch about them. Well, apparently you can, but you shouldn't be able to.

Comment Even if it isn't some blend (Score 4, Insightful) 570

Most fruit juices have a lot of sugar. Fruit contains a lot of fructose, water, and fiber. So squeeze out the water that contains the fructose, the fiber gets left behind, and you have something that is by volume and weight a tons of sugar.

Apple juice is a good example. If you go and have a look at the Simply Apple stuff at a grocer you can see easily. It really is 100% pure apple juice. They don't add any sweetener or anything else, they just squeeze the juice out of apple and bottle that shit up... and it is as high calorie as soda. 180 calories per 12 oz (355ml). For comparison Pepsi is 150 and Mountain Dew is 170.

I love apple juice, it tastes fantastic, but you can't fool yourself in to thinking that because it is juice it is magically good.

Comment And what, pray tell, is a "digital agenda"? (Score 4, Insightful) 109

Because it seems the US likes technology plenty. The US is a bastion of high tech research and production. Intel, AMD, nVidia, Texas Instruments, Analog Devices, Broadcom, IBM, most of the big names in chip technology are US companies with US R&D centers, and many of them have a lot of US production. That's just one example, you can point to plenty of other technologies that the US does a ton in, it is just a good one since those chips tend to underlie our digital devices these days.

Same deal on the purely digital side of things, namely software. The US is a mainstay in virtually every segment of software.

So what is this "digital agenda" that the US so desperately supposedly needs to not fall behind? Because they seem to be doing well.

Also as an aside, what's wrong with being #2 or #3 in something? I've visited a number of other countries, and by definition not all of them are #1 at most things. They are still very nice places to live and I have no issues. Seems that between #1 and "stone age shithole" there is a whole range of "quite nice places to live". So who cares if China is #1 at something?

Comment I'll make sure to let me sister know (Score 0) 164

She'll be happy to know that her cell plan is much cheaper than she thinks it is, because some random dude on the Internet is convinced US cell plans have to be more expensive.

I'm going to guess you have no fucking idea what you are talking about, and are just hating on the Us because that's trendy to do. My cell plan is 50 USD/month. For that I get unlimited calls to and from any number in the US, Canada, and Mexico, landline or cellphone. I get unlimited text to and from any cellphone in about 140 countries (including Europe). I get 1GB of data at 4G speeds (meaning about 30-40mbit/sec where I live) and then 2G speeds after that (meaning about 100k/sec) unless I choose to buy more.

When traveling internationally I can continue to use my text and data just like in the US, no extra charge. Voice calls are $.20/minute when roaming, though as mentioned not in Canada or Mexico.

My sister couldn't believe it. She lives in the UK and we were discussing my trip to visit and she was mentioning getting a prepaid SIM, which I told her I don't need. I told her my plan and she was stunned.

This isn't some super-secret service or anything, it is just T-Mobile's normal post-paid plan. They are happy to sell it to anyone and advertise it heavily.

So how's your plan compare? Also please remember when talking about roaming and long distance that the US is almost certainly a bit larger than your country. Roaming and calls in all 50 US states would more be the equivalent of roaming and calls in all of Europe, than all of one European country.

Comment Re:Programming is a trade (Score 2) 300

If that's true why do so many talented programmers lack critical thinking skills when it comes to politics, economics, society, culture, and their personal lives? Seriously, I always thought that programming should teach critical thinking skills, but I've lost track of the number of clueless programmers who have great problem-solving skills on a computer but are completely incompetent outside that domain.

Comment Re:Move to the latest version? (Score 1) 435

It is gonna cost probably a couple hundred million in routers and modems that cannot support IPV6

...if you attempted to replace them all at once today. No one does that. Instead, IPv6 support will become a bullet point for purchasing replacements for EOL hardware and we'll transition to it naturally as IPv4-only hardware falls by the wayside.

He's dead, Jim.