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Comment: Re:Wrong target (Score 1) 54

by Just Some Guy (#49358493) Attached to: Google Loses Ruling In Safari Tracking Case

The target should be Apple not Google.

That's a stupendous way to end software development overnight. Yes, Apple had a bug. All software has bugs. They clearly intended for a different outcome and surely never expected Google to actively attack it.

Of the two, Apple made a mistake but acted with good intentions (at least on the surface, but there's no point going full tinfoil because then there's no point having a conversation about it). Google acted maliciously, and if someone's going to be held accountable for this then it should be them.

In before "lol fanboy": I would say exactly the opposite if, say, iCloud.com exploited a bug (not a feature: a bug) in Chrome to do the same thing. In this specific case, Apple seems to have acted honorably and Google unhonorably.

Comment: Re:Bummer (Score 3) 322

by Trogre (#49350967) Attached to: RSA Conference Bans "Booth Babes"

Your position is idiotic for any functioning society.

This argument reduces to the assertion that any dress code is immoral, and that people should be able to wear anything they like, including nothing. You then use the absurd leap to liken such a society that has a dress code to an oppressive muslim regime.

I hope the next person who sits beside you on a bus thinks like you do.

Comment: Re:python and java (Score 1) 481

by Just Some Guy (#49338871) Attached to: No, It's Not Always Quicker To Do Things In Memory

Python's string library isn't remotely what I'd call "overweight", but its strings are immutable. Some algorithms that are quick in other languages are slow in Python, and some operations that are risky in other languages (like using strings for hash keys) are trivial (and threadsafe) in Python. But regardless of the language involved, it's always a good idea to have a bare minimum of knowledge about it before you do something completely stupid.

The trouble with being punctual is that people think you have nothing more important to do.

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