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Comment Re:Caps Lock used to power a huge lever. (Score 4, Informative) 466 466

It was reverted because, as computers started systematically replacing the typewriter in businesses (instead of being a specialist machine, like terminals), secretary-typists and the typists in corporate typing pools complained about the location of the Caps Lock key not being where they were used to it. Keyboards for computers intended for general business use accordingly swapped over, since the people who typed the most and had the strongest opinions on keyboards in the early 1980s wanted it that way.

Comment Yes it is what we need (Score 4, Insightful) 326 326

Think of the countless small ways in which knowing some code, or scripting has been useful over your life - sorting simple lists, renaming things in batch, formulas in a spreadsheet... etc. etc.

Even if most people will not be doing code professionally, it will help them do little things for themselves. It will also help them understand to some extent why software driven things behave the way they do, and even to make more informed choices as to software driven hardware they buy (and that is the future).

It's not like a flood of really bad programmers will get through most hiring barricades, already famously difficult to storm. They will go on to do things besides programming, where light programming can help them.

Comment Re:Change Is Life (Score 2) 142 142

It's not all that hard to stick with a toolkit version for a couple of months (or to be honest, even a project lasting up to 18 months is no big deal.

That depends on the system. If you are doing iOS development, while 18 months is possible it's not advisable due to every new version of XCode (one major, a few minor updates every year) having more advanced tooling, compilers, frameworks... furthermore you are going to have to use a beta version at some point to test and debug your software on for un-released versions of iOS that you have to make sure you work well on before they are released.

I see your point, I was more speaking to the attitude of people that want to spend years without upgrading the underlying technologies involved in building and running your project... the longer you wait the worse the transition is, and like I said in the meantime you are also missing out on things that could have made development easier or resolved bugs you had to fix.

Submission + - Intel and Micron announce "Breakthrough Memory Technology"->

jcr writes: In production now, sampling later this year: non-volatile, ten times the density of NAND flash, and up to 1000x the speed. From the press release:

"For decades, the industry has searched for ways to reduce the lag time between the processor and data to allow much faster analysis," said Rob Crooke, senior vice president and general manager of Intel's Non-Volatile Memory Solutions Group. "This new class of non-volatile memory achieves this goal and brings game-changing performance to memory and storage solutions."

"One of the most significant hurdles in modern computing is the time it takes the processor to reach data on long-term storage," said Mark Adams, president of Micron. "This new class of non-volatile memory is a revolutionary technology that allows for quick access to enormous data sets and enables entirely new applications."


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