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Comment: Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (Score 5, Insightful) 80

Objection: relevance.

These other things are not the topic of discussion. They are just red herrings to distract from the fact that the US appears to have acted in a civilized manner this time.

Civilized behavior should not be swept under the rug because you have a hate-on for some particular country. Your nonsense undermines the positive reinforcement that encourages good behavior and discourages bad behavior.

Doesn't matter if it's the US or Hezbollah.

Comment: Re:Aaaaahahaha ... gotta love it: (Score 2) 111

by jedidiah (#47424551) Attached to: Prof. Andy Tanenbaum Retires From Vrije University

No. It was not a "sensible" comment for the time. Anyone with a lick of sense could see where the tech was going and could easily realize that you had to plan for the future.

PCs of the time were stuck in the kind of situation that Tannenbaum described not because of any inherent technical limitation but because Microsoft was a lame monopolistic sandbagger holding back the entire industry.

Even in 1992 there wasn't that much of a gap between the capabilities of proprietary Unix hardware and PCs. Some Unix machines even ran on microprocessors used by competing home computers.

That's why Linus created his own kernel to begin with.

Comment: Re:No (Score 1) 176

by DrXym (#47423345) Attached to: Will Google's Dart Language Replace Javascript? (Video)
Well JS sucks as a language to develop in so there is a benefit in developing in something else even if it ends up being machine generated into JS. However... it would be far more useful for browsers to support a low level bitcode (e.g. LLVM) with a set of APIs that tie into the gui, web, threading, local storage etc. than another high level language. Google has something already suitable for the job - PNaCl, but it should be standardized and simplified so any browser can implement it.

Dart could compile to bitcode and then it would execute at near native speeds. Even stuff like asm.js that is an optimized usecase for machine generated js is still a workaround of the fundamental issue - the lack of a lower level alternative.

Comment: Re:Buy the book BANNED by Costco! (Score 0) 146

by jedidiah (#47418607) Attached to: Alcatel-Lucent's XG-FAST Pushes 10,000Mbps Over Copper Phone Lines

If it weren't for all of this fake controversy and bogus righteous indignation, I would have no idea what this book is. Perhaps it just didn't sell well at Costco. It's a warehouse store you know. You can't depend on an item being there the next time you visit even if it was there the last time.

These Tea Baggers seem to be missing the whole "Warehouse Club" concept here.

Comment: Re:Cry Me A River (Score 1) 545

by jedidiah (#47415705) Attached to: Normal Humans Effectively Excluded From Developing Software

I might not be able to build a skyscraper but I can nail some boards together, plunge a toilet, wire a room, or lay some tile.

Basic home maintenance is something that everyone needs to understand regardless of whether they own their place or not. People need to know enough to be able to delegate to experts and not get robbed in the process. People need to understand what they are buying.

People need to be able to fend for themselves on a very basic level.

This American love of stupidity only serves to make for easier victims.

Comment: Re:Cry Me A River (Score 2) 545

by jedidiah (#47415633) Attached to: Normal Humans Effectively Excluded From Developing Software

"Complex" is not for laymen. There is only so much that you can do with any "appliance". Beyond that, you actually have to know what you are doing. This "problem" has nothing to do with programming.

Once you get into "complex", you really do want something along the lines of a profession were people have to be licensed and they can be held accountable for their failures. For the "complex" stuff, we should be striving MORE for something comparable to real engineering or medicine rather than pushing for trained monkeys and amateurs.

Right tool for the job and all that...

Comment: no rest no peace (Score 1) 65

These 3D whizmos, like for example LEAP motion (incredibly cool), all work great.... for about 20 minutes. Then you put them in the drawer because they require too much muscle coordination and energy to operate. in contrast when you REST your finger on a scroll wheel or REST your hand on a mouse it is not merely not moving, it is at rest in 3 dimensions. it only takes a small effort to move it, but you are not having to run a whole lot of muscles in coordination to keep the hand or finger in a constant position. it's hard to poise your hand in empty space. In the old days, good typists could do this with hands poised over the KB and fingers hovering above the keys. Most people now days use palm rests or put pressure on the keys. those old time secretarial pool typists had to sit up straight and brace their feet on the floor to pull that off. Girdles probably helped!

the first successful mouse replacement will have that feature. Perhaps something with haptic feedback to support your finger a little till you really want to move it.

personally I suspect the some sort of eye motion or maybe a joystick like thing will be the first 3D controller that people can use for long periods.

Comment: Re:19,000 (Score 1) 398

by BrookHarty (#47397093) Attached to: No Shortage In Tech Workers, Advocacy Groups Say

>there certainly is a shortage of tech workers in the US willing to work for 19,000/year

Up here in Seattle, there are blocks of apartment buildings manned by outsourcing companies like Mindtree where there are 3-5 Indian contractors living in each unit getting paid under 30k each. With houses going for 3-4K and 3 bedroom apartments going for 2K-2.5K, they have to have so many people living together to save money.

I saw ATT Wireless replace an entire billing department with cheap overseas labor, VP gets a big fat bonus and leaves. Then department fucked up and was billed 1 million dollars a day for almost a month and they had to bring in very expensive contractors to fix the issues. Funny thing, this is happening all the time, the PHB outsources, collects a fat paycheck, moves on, and boom, issues appear.

But I've also worked with NOC's from India and helped build one out. We pay 5K a month for 4 people for 24 hours watch our network and take tickets. There is no way we could afford that here. The problem I have is the NOC use to be a stepping stone for jr sysadmins to work their way up, and that stepping stone is largely vanishing.

One of the most overlooked advantages to computers is... If they do foul up, there's no law against whacking them around a little. -- Joe Martin

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