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Comment: Re:When did it actually start? (Score 1) 289

by FranckMartin (#36104532) Attached to: Microsoft Antitrust Oversight Ends
Vint co-invented the Internet, was co-founder of ISOC, first ICANN chairman, and I don't think Google tells him what he should say, Google has him on staff to help him pursue _his_ work. TCP/IP is an open standard at a time where there was only proprietary protocols, the whole IETF is based on equal participation by all. In a way this is what inspired the Open-Source movement.

He is also listened by all the world leaders.

But Vint biggest trick, he is an enabler of people and can inspire many and has inspired many.

So yes he has indisputable respect from the Internet community.

He is not always right, like any human being, but he is very well respected.

PS: fun fact, the architect in the matrix is taken as a model from him, another form of respect.

+ - What can I do when I know who stole my identity?->

Submitted by jdharm
jdharm (1667825) writes "Short of vigilantism, what can I do when I've caught identity thieves and the authorities don't care? I had my credit card cloned within 7 days of its issue to me and without my ever having used it. I had dates, times, store locations, signed receipts (!) and video tape of the perpetrators, but law enforcement local to my area and where the cloned card was used said is wasn't worth their time because the dollar value was so low. The company I work for had a group in FL place orders with us using stolen cards and gave us physical addresses for delivery. Again, the authorities said is wasn't worth their time. At one point I had PD local to the thieves on one line and the thieves on the other giving me the 3rd stolen card number that day. The PD said they recognized the address as one they'd pulled stolen goods from the week before but the value of the orders they were placing with us was so low that it wasn't worth their time! Since this crossed state lines, involved the internet (wire fraud) and involved one card holder who had lost over $30,000 I called the FBI and they it wasn't worth their time. The agent sympathized with my frustration but said he could put together an iron clad case against these people but no one would prosecute it because the dollar value, tens of thousands, was so low that it wasn't worth anyone's time. It infuriates me that these people can steal with impunity. What can I do when I know who they are and where they are but no one cares?"
Link to Original Source
The Internet

+ - IETF celbrates 25th aniversary->

Submitted by FranckMartin
FranckMartin (1899408) writes "Little known to the general public the Internet standard body, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) celebrates its 25th birthday on the 16th January. DNSSEC, IDN, SIP, IPv6, HTTP, MPLS,.. all acronyms that were codified at the IETF. But little known, one can argue the IETF does not exist, it just happens that people meet 3 times a year in some hotel around the world and are on mailing lists in between. The openness of the IETF and its structure has inspired the way ICANN is run as well as the way the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) has been open to the civil society."
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Google

+ - Google to push WebM with IE9, Safari plugins-> 1

Submitted by surveyork
surveyork (1505897) writes "A new chapter in the browser wars:

"Google in a defense of its decision to pull H.264 from Chrome's HTML5 revealed that it will put out WebM plugins for Internet Explorer 9 and Safari. Expecting no official support from Apple or Microsoft, Google plans to develop extensions that would load its self-owned video codec. No timetable was given."

So Google gets started with their plan for world-wide WebM domination. They'll provide WebM plugins for the browsers of the H.264-only league, so in practice, all mayor browsers will have WebM support –one way or the other.

Machiavellian move?"

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+ - UN To Investigate Manning Confinement->

Submitted by Frosty Piss
Frosty Piss (770223) writes "The lawyer for alleged Wikileaker Pfc. Bradley E. Manning has filed a request to military officials on Thursday seeking Manning's release. 'This request is based upon the fact that the confinement conditions currently being endured by Pfc. Manning are more rigorous than necessary to guarantee his presence at trial, and that the concerns raised by the government at the time of pretrial confinement are no longer applicable,' attorney David Coombs wrote. Meanwhile, the United Nations' anti-torture chief said Friday that he has asked the U.S. State Department to investigate Manning's treatment at a Marine Corps brig in Quantico, Va. Confinement rules require guards to question Manning about his welfare every five minutes when he's awake, prevent him from exercising in his cell and bar him from keeping reading material overnight."
Link to Original Source
Open Source

+ - Tomcat 7 finalized ->

Submitted by alphadogg
alphadogg (971356) writes "The volunteer developers behind Apache Tomcat have released version 7.0.6 http://tomcat.apache.org/download-70.cgi of the open-source Java servlet container.

"This is the first stable release of the Tomcat 7 branch," developer Mark Thomas wrote in an e-mail announcing the release on various Tomcat developer mailing lists.

While not a full application server, Tomcat implements the functionality described in the Java Enterprise Edition Web profile specifications. Most notably, it supports version 3.0 of the Servlet API (application programming interface) and version 2.2 of JavaServer Pages, both part of the recently ratified JEE 6. A servlet container manages Java-based applications that can be accessed from a Web browser.

One big area of improvement is in configuration management for Web applications. Previous versions required all Web app configuration changes to be entered in a central file called web.xml, a process that led to unwieldy web.xml files as well as security risks."

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Comment: What is exactly the problem? (Score 2) 945

by FranckMartin (#34690170) Attached to: The Right's War On Net Neutrality
The problem is that there is not enough bandwidth in the USA, so people, instead of throwing more bandwidth at the problem, try to define ways to control the current bandwidth.

I'm sure we have already spent more money in Network Neutrality issues than if we had put more bandwidth.

Note this problem is not much felt in other part of the world, because there is sufficient bandwidth for current services. In USA, rural America is still much under dial-up...

If the government wants to help: bring broadband in all corners of the USA.

You are an insult to my intelligence! I demand that you log off immediately.

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