Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Seems appropriate (Score 2) 328

by ray-auch (#47420499) Attached to: UK Computing Student Jailed After Failing To Hand Over Crypto Keys

Funny isn't it - the US doesn't allow compelled testimony, but resolves 97% of federal cases through plea-bargain, so that's >97% conviction rate.

I'm sure plea bargains are always always guilty people accepting a lesser charge to reduce their punishment, and never the innocent feeling compelled threatened or coerced into pleading guilty to a lesser charge, but in the UK where it's not used I think the prosecutors only get about 80% convictions - and you'd think they would be much _more_ careful to pick the strong cases because they have to have the expense of trial every time.

So, hats off to the US law enforcement and prosecutors or being so very very good at identifying the guilty, or at compelling the innocent to admit guilt (in the land of the fifth) whichever it is...

Comment: Re:Actually makes good sense (Score 1) 674

by ray-auch (#47399107) Attached to: TSA Prohibits Taking Discharged Electronic Devices Onto Planes

Certainly there are so vanishingly few legitimate reasons a persons phone would be discharged....

Yeah, would have to be one of those rare occasions where, say, hundreds of people get stuck together in the same space for 8hrs+ with no (or too few) charging facilities. Not the sort of thing that ever happens at an airport...

Comment: Re:Well, duh... (Score 1) 210

What we DONT want however is if I go raping or beating people I can get news articles about me supressed.

But that is exactly what the ruling does. Someone got into legal trouble, some time ago (over 12yrs), and complained to the court that it was unfair to have his legal troubles still come up in search results - and the court agreed.

As an offline example, as long as your raping and beating didn't get you more than four years in prison, in UK law your conviction would be "spent" after at most 7 years after release, and you would then not have to disclose it to employers etc. In such a case, it seems perfectly clear that this ruling would then apply to search results covering your conviction - after all, not much point in saying you don't have to put it on the job application if it's on the front page when your prospective employer puts your name into Google.

The issue (as the GP says) is that the law applies to _everybody_

- people who are good and just made a mistake a long time ago and want a level playing field with those that didn't make a mistake
- people who were bad but are now reformed and want a level playing field with those that were good all along
- people who were bad, still are bad, and don't want you to find out easily

Who is going to determine what sort of person the complainant is ?

Comment: Re:Faith in God (Score 2) 295

by ray-auch (#47374905) Attached to: Site of 1976 "Atomic Man" Accident To Be Cleaned

Some, arguably the smarter ones, pray for guidance, then see a doctor and take medical treatment, then thank god for guiding them to what they could have figured out themselves. But, they are happy.

Others pray only for a miracle, knowing that miracles are rare, and die knowing that either that was God's purpose or they just didn't deserve the miracle enough. But, they are happy.

Then there's those who really don't get that "God works in mysterious ways" might mean that God wants them to assign perfectly normal human interventions (like medical treatment) to being his work (and why not?, builds faith, saves work, lets him do more of whatever gods do when not babysitting their createes). Such people rarely go happy, as with the old flood joke: http://jokes.cc.com/funny-god-...

Comment: Re:Lawsuits will fly (Score 1) 495

by ray-auch (#47359543) Attached to: Microsoft Takes Down No-IP.com Domains

Amen (and mod parent up).

There is another interesting thing for disrupted users - service was only supposed to be stopped for sumdomains on the court list or subsequently found to be hosting malware. So if your service is now stopped, MS are effectively publicly asserting that you are a malware host (and hence possibly a Doe defendant in the suit). If you aren't hosting malware, looks like potential defamation by MS as well...

Comment: Re:Legal Precedent? (Score 1) 495

by ray-auch (#47358967) Attached to: Microsoft Takes Down No-IP.com Domains

The Ex-Parte motion and TRO has to be fololowed by real court action. You should be able to file your own Amicus brief to the court if affected by this action - or maybe as part of a group e.g. through EFF if they are interested.

If several thousand individuals and businesses file briefs that their subdomains were not of the malware list and were not hosting malware and the MS ceased service causing them damage and loss... then the court might take some notice. might.

Comment: Re:Well, fuck you very much (Score 1) 495

by ray-auch (#47358693) Attached to: Microsoft Takes Down No-IP.com Domains

First check your sub domain is not on the list for which they are allowed to fail to return a response, see http://www.noticeoflawsuit.com...
- if so, they are accusing you directly of hosting malware, probably best check that out first...

Otherwise, if you are not on that list then it looks to me like they are violating the order if they are failing to return response for your subdomain. You would need to collect evidence (failed dns resolutions etc.), and evidence of your costs (alternative service provision, trips to check security manually, don't forget to charge your time at normal daily rate... etc.) and then you could sue them - since they have UK presence. Class action is not an option (usually in the UK) but small claims is, although it costs, but it may be worth it depending on how much damage they have done you. Remember you are not challenging the US court order but rather MS failure to deliver continued dns service to subdomains not on the court order (as it implies they will). If you are UK based and since MS has UK presence, UK court is probably correct venue. If (and IANAL) this is feasible, then it would be best if lots of affected people did it at once - since like most courts MS has to file defence / turn up, or they lose, and if there are a _lot_ of cases all at once...

Before small claims court you are supposed to try and resolve the issue and there are some rules (letter before action, http://www.justice.gov.uk/cour...) - basically you can start writing complaint letters to MS in the UK (where you may sue) and cc MS in the US, and you can start costing them lawyer time right now, for very little cost and essentially no risk to yourself.

Or maybe talk to the EFF, they might get involved in the US because if MS have ceased service to legit users not on the list in the order and not hosting malware, then they may be in violation of their own court order. EFF might want to get involved at next stage and submit Amicus Curiae brief on behalf of innocent users.

Comment: Re: PowerShell (Score 1) 215

by ray-auch (#47333015) Attached to: Exploiting Wildcards On Linux/Unix

* and ? are illegal characters in windows filenames, which prevents this. As is /, which is used to indicate parameters in windows command prompt (dos style), which effectively means that the style of attack in TFA doesn't work. Except maybe for unix (GNU, cygwin etc.) apps on windows which use "--" to indicate command option , and "--" is allowed in windows filenames, thus porting this Unix bug/hole/feature to Windows.

And of course Windows has other idiosyncrasies. Nothing is perfect.

Comment: Bender? (Score 3, Funny) 28

frustrated by the lack of consideration of style in the medical device development process. Despite all the progress made in other areas, the devices still look more or less like a "wooden stick." Bender wants to challenge what we think is possible with prosthetics.

"Bite my shiny, metal ass!"

[sorry, someone had to say it...]

Comment: Re:Patent pending? (Score 1) 448

by ray-auch (#47306309) Attached to: $500k "Energy-Harvesting" Kickstarter Scam Unfolding Right Now

Someone called Paul McArthur does, in fact, have a bunch of patents in this area:

http://www.google.com/patents/...
https://www.google.com/search?...

if it's the same Paul McArthur, then the answer is "yes they do have a patent".

Whether you can actually build what is in the marketing or the patent is another matter entirely.

If this is timesharing, give me my share right now.

Working...