Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Waitasecondhere... (Score 1) 393

by Eloking (#49588953) Attached to: Tattoos Found To Interfere With Apple Watch Sensors

You're not saying that the average hipster will actually read "that part", or much of anything else besides Twitter, are you? Hope not, at least my observation of them is that a tweet is about the maximum their attention span will handle.

Absolutly not. As another ./er pointed out, Apple either hided that problem for the lauch or didn't do much research on the matter. I'm sure +99.9% of all Apple watch buyer were not aware the heart sensor might not work if you have a tattoo on that part until this news came out (granted the % of the population with a tattoo on the wrist is low, but still). And since I've learned this on /. only so far, I'm also sure that +99.8% are still not aware of it.

Comment: Re:Waitasecondhere... (Score 1) 393

by Eloking (#49586205) Attached to: Tattoos Found To Interfere With Apple Watch Sensors

But it does say this:

"Even under ideal conditions, Apple Watch may not be able to get a reliable heart rate reading every time for everybody. And for a small percentage of users, various factors may make it impossible to get any heart rate reading at all."

Tattoos being one of the 'various factors'.

So you're saying the average hipster will make the conclusion that the heart sensor might not work because of his tattoo "prior" purchase after reading that part? Really?

Comment: Re:Video from the barge (Score 1) 113

by Eloking (#49491523) Attached to: An Engineering Analysis of the Falcon 9 First Stage Landing Failure

You, like many people, are trying to solve the wrong problem. Fix the over-correction and there is no need for rocket powered thrusters in place of the cold gas thrusters. Fix the root cause, don't mask it with a heavy/expensive kludge that will come with a host of it's own failure modes.

I partially agree with this. Correcting the root of the problem seem to be the best solution, but one thing my years in precise robot precision though me is that usually, "asservissement" (french word because I don't know the exact English translation, but I would guess it's control with feedback) is more efficient while correcting the root isn't always possible.

Comment: Re:Not a shocking revelation to be honest . . (Score 1) 237

by Eloking (#49475047) Attached to: Chess Grandmaster Used iPhone To Cheat During Tournament

Cheating is rampant in all things anymore.

He's a grandmaster until he gets caught cheating. Until then, he dominates the field and the pressure is on for others to cheat as well just so the playing field is level. ( The Tour De France comes to mind, as does US Baseball's Steroid issue, Online Gaming / Gambling, Standardized Tests ( like the SAT, ACT, Bar exam, etc. etc. )

It makes it impossible to compete unless you're bending the rules also.

Makes you wonder of all the "winners" out there, what percentage of them made it to that pedestal legitimately ?

This! And how much further until people start to put intelligent chip directly inside the body? I'm sure it wont be too difficult with today's technology to hide inside your mouth a device that communicate on the internet with a supercomputer at home. The input could come from the tongue and the output could be a speaker to send sound through the bone.

But chest wouldn't be the most lucrative target. Poker or blackjack (card counting) on the other hand seem to be way more lucrative.

Comment: Re:No they don't (Score 1) 226

by Eloking (#49371997) Attached to: Chinese Scientists Plan Solar Power Station In Space

This stupid idea gets floated every few years. It doesn't work, even in theory. Do the math yourself.

https://matter2energy.wordpress.com/2012/03/17/the-maury-equation-redux/

Basically your link tell us there's 50% lost in the microwave/laser transmission and that a solar power plan have a life time of ~12 years compared to ground based solar power plan with ~40 years (which is calculated as a 70% lost).

It's interesting at most, but those two factor are clearly not set in stone and could evolve with the advancement of the technologies.

Comment: Re:Cher gouvernement (Score 1) 237

Embarrassed? Not at all. There's retard everywhere and Quebec certainly isn't an exception. I actually love my Quebec but for some reason the rest of the country seem to believe we're isolationists.

Well, we aren't. The young generation doesn't share the hate toward Canada of our elder and from what I've saw in my travel, the young generation from the rest of Canada doesn't seem to hate us either. I like Canada and being Canadian, I just love been a Quebecer more. It doesn't mean I want to separate.

Comment: Re:Time to leave (Score 1) 237

??? When exactly I've said that I've designed only 1 PCB? I've done a little more than a dozen. And before you answer this, I just want to make clear that my intent was never to compete with you to see which one of us was the best PCB designer. You said that you have ton of experience but couldn't find job because of the lack of diploma and Altium experience so I suggested that you suck it up and either learn it, go back to school or find a company in the continent that need someone with your skill.

And about electronics company, that's what my friends in electric engineering told me. They didn't have problem to find jobs and the fact that I don't work for an electronics company doesn't mean anything.

They're the things you *maintain*, certainly not *design* or build. ETS is the new technician factory. You don't have what it takes to design robots. You're an "engineer" the same way an aircraft maintenance engineer is an engineer, because the government says so, not because of what you can actually *do*.

Omg! Well, sadly I cannot discuss my work on forum like those but let me tell you this, you have absolutely *no idea* of what I'm doing in Bombardier. Quite funny to read you thought. Assuming I don't have what it take to be an engineer and that I cannot design shit. Oh well, you can go on about bashing the province, the company, the young all you want if it make you fell better. Not that I really care to be honest.

Comment: Re:Cher gouvernement (Score 1) 237

So now you're showing me some crappy book about money laundering and tell me I'm ignorant? And what does it have to do in this discussion? Afaik money laundering is a problem in most (if not all) country of the world.

Furthermore, I've never said that Quebec wasn't corrupted, I've said it was far less corrupted when compared to the rest of the world : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C...

And about the Charbonneau Commission, most of those crime doesn't made any significant impact on the economy. We're billion in the red, who the f**k care about 100k$ contract sold to the brother or the cousin? Corruption not the main reason why the province is in the red.

Comment: Re:Time to leave (Score 1) 237

So with all due respect, you know maybe 10% of Altium and 5% of Allegro, and 0% of the PCB design landscape as a profession.

So much for humility. All your claims about the programs being similar are garbage.

What the actual heck? So Altium cannot make PCB now? I'm not claiming the program are identical, I'm claiming they are two different tool with the same purpose so your experience of PCB designer can be used on a employer that look for PCB designer with Altium experience as long as you learn it.

And "robotics" is probably a fancy word for "I assemble PLCs to put labels on lipstick containers and use ladder diagrams to adjust the timing of label maker". Come on, there's no "robotics" in Quebec.

When I say "Robotic", I mean "Robotic" (A.K.A. Industrial Robot). And if there's no robotic, I really wonder what are those odd orange mechanical things I've been working with in the last few years.

I really want to know where you work so I never have the misfortune of working in the same building as you. It's bad enough we're in the same province.

You certainly seem to be a pleasant person so I can say that the sentiment is mutual. I usually avoid answering personal question but what the hell, I work with Bombardier so I you can sleep safe knowing Bombardier doesn't hire PCB designer.

But you're right about one thing, I have to work harder to get out of this inbred province of retards. And yeah, you ETS guys are the laughing stock of all the real engineers I know. They resent you for not having the same workload and same quality of education as they do.

I know a guy who graduated from ETS from when it was just a technical college, so I know very well the history. Spare me, ETS is just a meat-grinder to get kids to pay for an education that may very well never materialize into jobs. How about that Hydro Quebec work program hm?

Yeah I already got your hate for the ETS in your previous post. It's your opinion but I certainly doesn't share it (nor does most of the company in Montreal).

Comment: Re:Time to leave (Score 1) 237

Well, I couldn't know that scholarship wasn't available to you since I didn't know your age. I'm not sure how studying with "Like, crazy hot. Like, movie hot." woman bothered you but I'm not sure Concordia was the best choice.

Also, I'm falling to see how getting an electric engineering degree is stupid for someone with a strong PCB design background but law or administration isn't. But I guess it's your call and your life.

Comment: Re:Time to leave (Score 1) 237

"No, I know both program and I've done multi-layer and high speed. Granted, faster I've make is about 300MHz on 4 layer b"

So, DC on hobby boards. This is the sign of a healthy tech sector in Montreal?

It was for an internship. I'm not working on PCB design anymore, I've found my way in robotic.

Comment: Re:Time to leave (Score 1) 237

Oh, so that's why. We're more similar that I thought. I also had a similar experience. I've quit school to start working as a Perl/Java/Python/C# programmer with only my high-school diplomat. Sadly, we live in a society that value a piece of paper more than actual skill.

I got lucky thought, I found that out at 23 and decided to go back to college. I don't know how old you are but going back to school is always an option. Plus, since you worked for a long time you should have access to a huge scholarship (I'm serious, simulate it on the government website). It certainly won't be as much than what you have earned but it's probably better than being unemployed.

The greatest productive force is human selfishness. -- Robert Heinlein

Working...