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Submission + - Sourceforge staff takes over a user's account and wraps their software installer ( 11

An anonymous reader writes: Sourceforge staff took over the account of the GIMP-for-Windows maintainer claiming it was abandoned and used this opportunity to wrap the installer in crapware. Quoting Ars:

SourceForge, the code repository site owned by Slashdot Media, has apparently seized control of the account hosting GIMP for Windows on the service, according to e-mails and discussions amongst members of the GIMP community—locking out GIMP's lead Windows developer. And now anyone downloading the Windows version of the open source image editing tool from SourceForge gets the software wrapped in an installer replete with advertisements.


Submission + - Google to pay $0 to Oracle in copyright case (

An anonymous reader writes: From the article:
"In a hearing in the US District Court today, it was determined that Google will pay a net total of nothing for Oracle's patent claims against them. In fact, Google is given 14 days to file an application for Oracle to pay legal fees to Google(in a similar manner to how things are done for frivolous lawsuits). However, it is not quite peaches and roses for Google, as Oracle is planning on appealing the decision in the case."

Submission + - One-billion-pixel camera catches the smallest details ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: A camera made from off-the-shelf electronics can take snapshots of one billion pixels each — about one thousand times larger than images taken by conventional cameras.

David Brady, an engineer at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and his colleagues are developing the AWARE-2 camera with funding from the United States Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency. The camera’s earliest use will probably be in automated military surveillance systems, but its creators hope eventually to make the technology available to researchers, media companies and consumers.

Comment They're getting it wrong (Score 5, Insightful) 449

The European Telecom operators should know that we, Internet subscribers, pay for our connection top Euros to be able to access sites like Google, Gmail or Youtube. Google is offering most of their services for free to their users and we, as clients of the Telecom companies, are already paying.

At least, Spain's Telefonica CEO demonstates he's just a parasite that doesn't know about what he's talking except getting more money from Google and their clients. If you understand the Spanish talked by a almost drunk man, you'll get the point watching this video:

Comment Re:No (Score 5, Informative) 425

No, PS3 has not made any money and it may never make any.
Sony videogames division in the past three years (PS3 era+R&D, including PS2 and PSP):

2006 ===== 75 (positive)
2007 = -1,969 (negative)
2008 = -1,265 (negative)
2009 ===== 51 (positive)

Total 2006-09 === -3,108

(in million US$)

Comment Not correct (Score 2, Insightful) 296

No, you are not right. In Spain, where we both live it's illegal to copy software, even if it's non-for-profit.

But Spanish judges dismiss charges against people modifying their consoles or copying music or movies for personal use.

What Nintendo wants is to make illegal devices like R4/M3/WiiKey and blocking webpages that give access to pirated games (software).

Good luck with that, but I don't think it would be possible here.

"People should have access to the data which you have about them. There should be a process for them to challenge any inaccuracies." -- Arthur Miller