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Comment Re:Apple would reject 100% CPU app (Score 1) 335

I thought 100% CPU loops in a background application were exactly what the App Store review process was designed to prevent.

Unfortunately, first-party code doesn't go through that same process. I was thinking in particular about a recent experience with spotlight indexing when I made that snarky comment.

Comment Re:Real bad news (Score 1) 335

This. "I would buy an iPhone if it were only thinner," said no one ever.

What would make me upgrade my iPhone 6S to the iPhone 7 rather than skipping two generations and buying the iPhone 8? Give me the ability to carry my phone for a two week trip, using it the way I do now, without having to charge it.

By contrast, there's something bordering on pure insanity about the notion of taking away the headphone jack that many of us use very heavily in our cars while charging the device just so that Apple's engineers can brag about how much thinner they made a device that's already too thin to hold up to your ear without being constantly in fear of dropping it unless you put it in a case. Doubly so when you realize that it will likely mean relying more and more on software tricks to keep the battery life numbers up, while the worst-case battery life (with one of those hundred minor background daemons sitting in a tight loop using 100% of one CPU) continues to decline.

Comment Re: Airplane Mode (Score 1) 335

In the U.S., portable devices like cell phones can be used in airplane mode during takeoff and landing. Wireless headsets, however, are not allowed. So this would mean that if you plan to fly, you'll have to carry your wired headphones and an adapter. Just another reason that removing the headphone jack is an idiotic idea.

Comment USB is a support nightmare (Score 4, Interesting) 260

Unlike ethernet, which is pretty much standard from platform to platform and basically trivial to support, USB code is completely different between linux, OS X, and Windows, and is a mess, API-wise.

I write software defined radio stuff, and after one incredible nightmare getting a USB SDR to work on all three platforms using conditional compilation (I did succeed), I swore off. No more. If it doesn't have an ethernet interface, or a USB-to-ethernet server app compatible with the standard SDR protocols that makes it appear to me as an ethernet SDR, it's not happening.

Luckily, some of the best SDR manufacturers out there have done it right. Andrus, AFDRI, and RFSPACE. And there are some servers that have been built to hide the abortion of USB, but so far they are very much platform-specific, for the very reason I described above.

USB. Ugh.

Comment Re:Oh, really? (Score 1) 220

Samsung has sold hundreds of millions of phones with OLED screens in.

Samsung manufactures OLED screens. They don't have to worry about a supplier not being able to meet demand, because they are the supplier. If they have to throw more money at it to bump up production, they will. If the yield is too low, they can make up for it by cranking up the price of OLEDs disproportionately for everyone else that they supply panels to, or by cutting off those other companies entirely.

A company buying panels from somebody else doesn't have that flexibility.

Comment Re: Easy solution (Score 1) 471

Eventually, those bearings fail, and you have to replace the motor, but not for a very long time.

I certainly hope not. You can typically press new bearings in for just about all other motors, after all.

You can put new bands in a transmission, too. Still, probably 99% of the time, you get a rebuilt transmission installed, and the installer ships back the old part to be remanufactured. I would expect that to be true for electric motor repairs as well.

You missed suspension, steering, body work/subframe rot, electical issues, HVAC issues, LED lights (yeah, they do go bad, apparently rather often from what I've seen on the road), tires, snow tires and wheels, parking brake adjustment, brake fluid, bearing replacement, differential work (though that could be eliminated), axle issues, interior problems (broken seats, for example), interior lights, batteries, and probably other stuff I've forgotten.

Brakes and steering on most electric vehicles are electrical, not hydraulic, which should result in very low maintenance, at least within the currently typical lifespan of a car.

Besides, most of the things on that list are repairs (after failures), not routine maintenance (to prevent future failures). There's nothing you can do maintenance-wise to prevent a blown interior bulb or a broken seat (except perhaps losing weight if you're on the heavy side).

The only thing on your list that I would consider true maintenance is tires, which was one of the things I mentioned.

Comment Re:Allow me to predict the comments (Score 1) 233

Part of it is simply a matter of dongle-count. Yes, ethernet is absolutely needed; yes, the connector should be right there, physically secure. No, USB dongles to provide ethernet won't ever be on my list of things I'm excited to do.

It would be better - a lot better - if there was actual, reliable ethernet hardware on there, and I'd be more than happy to pay a few bucks for it.

The ethernet on the other PI's is not particularly reliable, and that, in my case, is the downfall of the whole enterprise. I have four pis. They all drop their ethernet connections from time to time. It's beyond annoying.

Comment Re: Easy solution (Score 4, Informative) 471

And yes owners, there is oil needed for your volt.

Um, no. Electric cars use permanently lubricated bearings. There's no mechanism by which the dealer can add oil to anything. Eventually, those bearings fail, and you have to replace the motor, but not for a very long time.

Electric cars do need tire rotation, brake pad replacement, and replacement of brake lights and other exterior lights (if they aren't LEDs). Beyond that, they should be largely maintenance-free.

Comment Much todo about zip--ConsoleKit2 is also supported (Score 5, Informative) 748


First, only an idiot would want a monoculture, particularly in the Linux world, so to those saying "just to systemd full bore or go to (someplace else)" the rest of us need to respond with a very loud and resounding: Fuck You.

That said, things aren't nearly as dire as this post implies. Reading from the responses to the bug he himself linked to, I find the following:

> Unless KDE is prepared to make a statement that it depends on systemd

of course not. Powerdevil recently also gained support for ConsoleKit2, see:

Which turns it into a distro problem. Your distribution configured the system in a way that suspend/hibernate is broken. It doesn't come with any of the supported solutions Plasma provides. Which makes it a distro problem. The distro integrates various parts of the software stack. This includes it's the distro's task to ensure that components work together. It failed here by ripping out systemd and replace it with well nothing.

So while I'm sure the systemd zealots would love to see KDE, Gnome3, etc. only work with systemd and drop support for all other distros, this doesn't appear to be happening. In the case of KDE, ConsoleKit2 is supported (and therefor Funtoo, Gentoo, Arch with OpenRC, etc. will continue to work just fine).

"Don't worry about people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good, you'll have to ram them down people's throats." -- Howard Aiken