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Comment: Re:Wrong assumption (Score 1) 480

by shutdown -p now (#48681645) Attached to: Paul Graham: Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In

What about western Europe?

They don't really rely on skilled immigration to a significant extent. And for what they do, they have states in EU itself to cover it (Poland, Romania etc).

The US is the most populous developed country therefore in absolute terms will always have more jobs and more immigrants.

Even if you look at per capita numbers, US does beat Canada, which I would argue to be the most skilled immigration-friendly country.

However the quality of life is really debatable. Many people would prefer the quality of life of Europe, Canada, Japan, Australia. Personally I think oil rich Norway seems to offer the best quality of life.

The mistake that is often made when estimating said quality is looking at the averaged stats. Thing is, if you're immigrating for the sake of a good job, you need to look at what that job (and others like it) will give you, as opposed to the average or the median. In US, the average is indeed lower than most other western countries because of the wealth gap and piss-poor welfare policies. But people coming here for high-paid jobs (like IT) are getting a deal that's much better than average. And with enough money, you can absolutely have a great experience in US - a good house safe low-crime neighborhood, a great school for your kids in the same neighborhood, solid healthcare, and a private pension fund for retirement. And plenty of jobs to pick from.

Comment: Re:I automatically disbelieved this post (Score 1) 41

by PopeRatzo (#48681399) Attached to: Google and Apple Weaseling Out of "Do Not Track"

Of course, I have my own opinions but I won't share them because they reflect my own biases.

That may be the single stupidest sentence in the history of stupid sentences on the Internet.

You won't share what you think because it's what you think. Everything you see and think and say and do reflects your own biases. If you decide not to share a single bit of data that is floating around in your head if it happens to reflect your biases, that means you will spend the rest of your life mute, which come to think of it might be best for everyone.

I've just re-read your entire comment and it doesn't seem to say anything at all about anything. Are you a Markov bot? If so, your maker forgot to put in the AI.

Comment: Re:There's no such thing as a free lunch (Score 1) 41

by PopeRatzo (#48681365) Attached to: Google and Apple Weaseling Out of "Do Not Track"

One way or another, you pay for your free Internet services.

It's not "one way or another". It's ONE WAY.

Where do I sign up to pay for Google and Twitter and other internet services directly instead of via my private data? I've been to Google thousands of times, and I've never seen a "subscribe" button.

No, there is no "one way or another". You can ONLY pay for your internet services by letting companies upskirt your private communications and personal data. That gives you some idea of just how valuable your private data really is.

Comment: Re:Google's acquisition of Android Inc. Q.E.D. (Score 1) 86

by hairyfeet (#48679159) Attached to: Comcast-TWC Merger Review On Hold

Yeah and if you buy that bullshit? Got a bridge you might be interested in. My dad's business was right in the middle of their new "fiber rollout" and after the replacement? It WENT TO SHIT with his speed DROPPING from a high of 6mbps to 1.4mbps after! What did they offer to remedy this? If you said cellular broadband we have a winnar Johnny!

Don't buy the BS man, the SECOND the old POTS is gone you'll find everybody not in a cherry picked area watching their speed drop and being offer the "chance to upgrade" to assrapey cellular. Don't say "its a fluke" either because I've had to switch 3 customers network setups to cable so far in 2 different towns, same story. AT&T before "fiber" rollout? Decent speed. After? Welcome to shitstain. And guess what all 3 were offered as a "solution"? Yep, A big old assrape with a whole 3GB per month for the same price they were paying for DSL unlimited before. For old Ma Bell its great, no more regs like on landline, fuck 'em by the MB, and their answer to everybody who dares bitch? "You are too far from the hub to benefit from fiber" even if the DSLAM can be hit with a pellet gun from where you are standing!

Comment: Re:why not have an impact in their own countries? (Score 1) 480

by shutdown -p now (#48678987) Attached to: Paul Graham: Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In

I can assure you that even the most pessimistic prognoses that I hear here in US are still way better off than where my home country is, much less where it's heading with all the recent events.

Unless you're into the whole TEOTWAKI stuff. But even taken that for granted, the consequences of such a thing would be just as severe everywhere else. In fact, I would dare say that US (well, at least some parts of it) would be more likely to survive pretty much any conceivable doomsday scenario with something resembling a functional society.

Comment: Re:Visas, or Green Cards? (Score 1) 480

by shutdown -p now (#48678983) Attached to: Paul Graham: Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In

The point is that US effectively does have a program to bring high tech workers into the country as immigrants. It's just that it's not actually designed as such, and so the end results are much worse (for everyone) than a properly designed and managed program like that.

I don't see the point of comparing with most of those other 160 countries. Unlike US, they don't have a history of relying on immigration to maintain population and workforce growth. OTOH, the countries that I have named do. But unlike US, they're smart about how they do it.

Comment: Re:Visas, or Green Cards? (Score 2) 480

by shutdown -p now (#48678383) Attached to: Paul Graham: Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In

What you and a lot of other people don't understand is that for many of us, H1B visas are the only viable path to a green card. US immigration policy is rather ridiculous in that respect in that it doesn't have a properly designed, dedicated skilled immigration track, the way e.g. Canada, Australia or New Zealand do. So in practice that role is subsumed by the "dual-intent" H1B, where you come into the country on that as a "temp worker", and then get your employer to sponsor you for a green card.

Thus, H1B has two kinds of people lumped together into it: the true temp workers, usually paid low wages, and kicked out as soon as their visa expires; and people who are trying to actually immigrate and using it as a stepping stone. In most other countries, the two pools are separated much earlier on.

Comment: Re:why not have an impact in their own countries? (Score 1) 480

by shutdown -p now (#48678359) Attached to: Paul Graham: Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In

Why not stay in whatever country they currently reside and try to have an impact there?

As an H1-B from Russia, let me give you the answer:

Because I get paid waaaay more in US (even accounting for cost of living and cost of property). Because this is a more stable and prospering society with crime levels several times less. Because I can actually get into politics here on any level from local to national without risking my neck.

Basically, because the grass is greener on this side of the fence.

Comment: Re:Wrong assumption (Score 1) 480

by shutdown -p now (#48678349) Attached to: Paul Graham: Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In

TFS assumes that all great programmers actually want to live in the US.

It doesn't. It assumes that there is a sufficient number of great programmers who don't want to live where they currently live, and for whom a country like US that is easy for them to move into and that would offer great career opportunities would be very attractive. That is certainly true for pretty much anyone from a third world shithole somewhere in Africa or Asia, and even for many from relatively well off middle class families in Eastern Europe or Latin America.

Now it's true that US is not the only one offering this deal. The main players in the market today are US, Canada and Australia. Of these, US is the hardest to immigrate to and has the most associated red tape and the least clarity; Canada is arguably the easiest. OTOH, US generally offers the best career prospects, and the highest quality of life in terms of how much to earn vs cost of living, so it's still the #1 destination for skilled immigration.

Comment: Re:Mod parent up. (Score 1) 480

by shutdown -p now (#48678323) Attached to: Paul Graham: Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In

If company X wants to hire the top 20 programmers in India then they can do that. And those programmers can work from home (in India).

They can, and do. But when that happens, people start complaining about how those programmers working in India (and hence being paid proportionally to the cost of living there) undercut them. And they also pay their taxes in India, and spend that money there, thereby subsidizing Indian economy. So from your perspective, it's better that those same people are employed in US - where they have to contend with the cost of living here (and demand the appropriate wage), pay income and property taxes here, and spend their earned money here.

Unless, that is, you're one of the people who are complaining about the "curry stench".

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