Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Speaking of Tesla (Score 1) 46

finish off that bottle of Wild Turkey

Wild Turkey...please. Who's gonna drink that swill when I've got a few quarts of homemade slivovitza under my sink? That way, besides the buzz, I get all the vitamins and minerals from the plums. And, in a pinch, I can run my 1973 Mercedes diesel on the stuff.

If you were a real "thoughtful admirer" of Nikola Tesla, you'd know that. Hmph.

Comment: Re:Aaaaahahaha ... gotta love it: (Score 1) 122

by MightyMartian (#47428549) Attached to: Prof. Andy Tanenbaum Retires From Vrije University

At the time, the closest the DOS world had to multitasking was TSRs. Beside my first PC was my CoCo 3 with OS/9 level 2 with 512k of RAM with a true preemptive multitasking kernel running on an 8 but 6809 CPU. Microsoft's dominance at the time meant in many ways the most common 16 bit opposing system in the world was only marginally better than a CPM machine from 1980.

Comment: Speaking of Tesla (Score 2) 46

I have a Yugoslavian one hundred billion dinar note from when there was hyperinflation in that country a few decades ago. It's got a nice picture of Tesla on the front.

His birthday is also the same as my wife's.

I'm posting this comment apropos of nothing. But Tesla was one bad ass. And was so cool that David Bowie played him in a movie. And I have no evidence of this, but I'm pretty sure that the huge explosion in Tunguska back in 1908 was caused by Tesla trying to build a time machine. Or something. Here, go read it yourself. I have the day off tomorrow, so I'm already half in the bag. Catch me in an hour or so, and I'll tell you my theory about Tesla actually being the immortal Count of St. Germain, who still lives today developing Android apps and smoking DMT.

http://www.teslasociety.com/tu...

Comment: Re:A legend of OS design (Score 4, Interesting) 122

by MightyMartian (#47424441) Attached to: Prof. Andy Tanenbaum Retires From Vrije University

Minix was really the first of its kind; a Unix-like OS that you could run on cheap (relatively speaking at the time) commodity hardware and that you could get the source code for. A lot of the computing we take for granted now comes from Tanenbaum's work.

My first Minix install was on a 386-SX with a whopping 4mb of RAM I borrowed from work back in the early 1990s. I quickly abandoned Minix for Linux once it came out, but for several years I had Minix running on an old 386 laptop just for fun.

Comment: Re:His epitaph in future years: (Score 4, Interesting) 122

by MightyMartian (#47424411) Attached to: Prof. Andy Tanenbaum Retires From Vrije University

I really miss the good old days when technical debates were over the merits and faults of such simple things as different kinds of kernels, and not about whether or not every single thing you do online is being stacked into half a dozen nation's permanent data storage facilities.

The Linus vs. Tanenbaum dustup is from a simpler, more positive age.

Comment: Re: Cry Me A River (Score 1) 552

by shutdown -p now (#47420819) Attached to: Normal Humans Effectively Excluded From Developing Software

How can they even whet their childhood apetite with simple code if Windows no longer includes the QBASIC exe?

It does include csc.exe and vbc.exe, however.

An extremely complex barrier to entry needs to be overcome if they want Windows native code

Why would regular people care specifically about having "Windows native code"?

Comment: Re:Modern Day Anti-Evolutionists (Score 1) 380

There can be no "scientific consensus" in a society that hasn't discovered the scientific method. In those times, at best, what you had was the consensus of the "wise people".

So out of all the things you've listed, the "plum pudding" atomic model is the only one that would even qualify. But there was no consensus that it was like that. At best, it was accepted as the most reasonable model given all the evidence at the time (but, really, physicists had wildly different notions of atoms back then, and none of them were solid theories). It only took five years for more evidence to appear that proved the model was not viable.

"Nuclear war would really set back cable." - Ted Turner

Working...