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Verizon

Verizon Dropping Data Rates, But Current Customers Have To Call 136

Posted by timothy
from the oh-you-mean-you-didn't-like-getting-slammed? dept.
New submitter executioner writes with this news from Consumerist: In spite of Verizon Wireless' recent boasts that it's 'a leader, not a follower,' a new announcement from the nation's biggest wireless company shows that Big V is indeed following the competition down the path of charging customers less for their data plans. However, current Verizon subscribers will need to let the company know they want to save money (or get more data). It's a little confusing, so stick with us for a moment. Verizon MORE Everything customers who currently have monthly data allotments of 1GB, 2GB, 3GB, or 4GB will have an option on how they want to save.They can either get more data for their money by getting 1GB of additional data per month for no extra charge OR they can have their bill reduced by $10/month.So someone with a 2GB plan is currently paying $50/month. If they take the free data option, that goes to 3GB for the same price. Or they can elect to stick with the 2GB and their data bill drops to $40/month.
United States

Obama Proposes One-Time Tax On $2 Trillion US Companies Hold Overseas 825

Posted by samzenpus
from the pay-the-man dept.
mrspoonsi writes with news about a new proposed tax on overseas profits to help pay for a $478 billion public works program of highway, bridge and transit upgrades. President Barack Obama's fiscal 2016 budget would impose a one-time 14 percent tax on some $2 trillion of untaxed foreign earnings accumulated by U.S. companies abroad and use that to fund infrastructure projects, a White House official said. The money also would be used to fill a projected shortfall in the Highway Trust Fund. "This transition tax would mean that companies have to pay U.S. tax right now on the $2 trillion they already have overseas, rather than being able to delay paying any U.S. tax indefinitely," the official said. "Unlike a voluntary repatriation holiday, which the president opposes and which would lose revenue, the president's proposed transition tax is a one-time, mandatory tax on previously untaxed foreign earnings, regardless of whether the earnings are repatriated." In the future, the budget proposes that U.S. companies pay a 19 percent tax on all of their foreign earnings as they are earned, while a tax credit would be issued for foreign taxes paid, the official said.
Security

The Most Popular Passwords Are Still "123456" and "password" 197

Posted by Soulskill
from the i-have-the-same-password-on-my-luggage dept.
BarbaraHudson writes: The Independent lists the most popular passwords for 2014, and once again, "123456" tops the list, followed by "password" and "12345" at #3 (lots of Spaceballs fans out there?) . "qwerty" still makes the list, but there are some new entries in the top 25, including "superman", "batman", and "696969". The passwords used were mostly from North American and Western European leaks.
Software

How To Hijack Your Own Windows System With Bundled Downloads 324

Posted by timothy
from the would-be-funny-if-not-evil dept.
How-To Geek has tested and described something that you probably shouldn't do on your own computer -- unless, as they did, you do it on a virtual machine just for this purpose. Namely, they downloaded 10 of the most popular software titles from download.com, clicking through as a naive user might, accepting the defaults or the most obvious Next buttons, as most users surely do. They note that download.com's stated policies certainly look good on-screen; it says that the site comprehensively screens for, and disallows, malware of all kinds. But malware of various kinds, even if much of it is in a grey zone rather than actually malicious, is a fair description of what the authors encountered as they clicked through. Bundled software, some pieces of it at odds with others, was attached to each of the downloads, and from download to installation the process by design foisted more and more junk on their system, even if some of the bundled junk could have been avoided by a user jaded by previous hijackings. The conclusion: [N]o matter how technical you might be, most of the installers are so confusing that there's no way a non-geek could figure out how to avoid the awful. So if you recommend a piece of software to somebody, you are basically asking them to infect their computer. And it doesn’t matter which antivirus you have installed — we've actually done this experiment a number of times with different antivirus vendors, and most of them completely ignored all of the bundled crapware. Avast did a pretty good job this time compared to some of the other vendors, but it didn't block all of it for sure. There are also no safe freeware download sites because as you can clearly see in the screenshots in this article, it isn't just CNET Downloads that is doing the bundling it's EVERYBODY. The freeware authors are bundling crapware, and then lousy download sources are bundling even more on top of it. It's a cavalcade of crapware.

+ - Gogo airline network blocks youtube.. when they could just fix their bufferbloat-> 1

Submitted by mtaht
mtaht (603670) writes "David Reed (best known for the e2e argument) rants at Gogo Inflight's interception of https and suggests that: "It is the wrong solution... there’s a technically better one. I use GoGo a lot. I’ve discovered that their system architecture suffers from “bufferbloat” (the same problem that caused Comcast to deploy Sandvine DPI gear to discover and attack bittorrent with “forged TCP” packet attacks, and jump-started the political net neutrality movement by outraging the Internet user community). Why does that matter? Well, if GoGo eliminated bufferbloat, streaming to the airplane would not break others’ connections, but would not work at all, with *no effort on Gogo’s part* other than fixing the bufferbloat problem. [The reason is simple — solutions to bufferbloat eliminate buffering *in the network*, thereby creating "fair" distribution of capacity among flows. That means that email and web surfing would get a larger share than streaming or big FTP's, and would not be disrupted by user attempts to stream YouTube or Netflix. At the same time, YouTube and Netflix connections would get their fair share, which is *not enough* to sustain video rates — though lower-quality video might be acceptable, if those services would recode their video to low-bitrate for this limited rate access].""
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Well duh (Score 2) 420

by Mateorabi (#48704869) Attached to: The Open Office Is Destroying the Workplace
And the guy who sits next to those other people you are constantly coordinating and discussing issues with? The guy who needs to concentrate hard on a one-man project? He is freaking hating it, and by extension, you. Headphones don't eliminate all distraction cues. And you know what? You'd still be able to do your collaboration shtick in cubicles or offices by walking up to folks when you need to.

Open plan might work for some places, but its a fad being adopted by managers following trends without evaluating if they truly make sense for their shop.

Comment: Re:Heat gun (Score 3, Informative) 304

by Mateorabi (#48699073) Attached to: Putting a MacBook Pro In the Oven To Fix It
That depends on the board design. If the MoBo designer didn't balance the copper density well top-to-bottom it will warp the whole damn thing as if it were a thermostat. Technical term is "potato chip-ing" the board. Seeing as how the initial problem occurred under temperature loads bad design isn't outside the realm of the possible. Or they cheapped out and used thinner copper layers that didn't spread the heat evenly enough laterally. (Though as others have pointed out it may be something INSIDE the chip packages not the MoBo. Also 340F isn't enough to melt solder, particularly lead-free.)

Comment: Re:So... (Score 1) 282

by Mateorabi (#48340531) Attached to: When We Don't Like the Solution, We Deny the Problem
No, we should make our acceptance of [the existence of] the problem not be conditioned on (proposed) solutions. You are free to propose other solutions, and the choice of _which_ solution often politics and opinion. It's a variation of "everyone is entitled to their own opinion, not their own facts."

+ - Help stamp out CVS and SVN in our lifetime->

Submitted by mtaht
mtaht (603670) writes "ESR is collecting specifications and donations towards getting a new high end machine to be used for massive CVS and SVN repository conversions, after encountering problems with converting the whole of netbsd over to git.

What he's doing now sort of reminds me of holding a bake sale to build a bomber, but he's well on his way towards Xeon class or higher for the work.

What else can be done to speed up adoption of git and preserve all the computer history kept in source code repositories?"

Link to Original Source

1 Angstrom: measure of computer anxiety = 1000 nail-bytes

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