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Comment: The oxygen of publicity (Score 2) 208

by Butterspoon (#45550185) Attached to: UK Gov't Plans To Censor "Extremist" Websites Via Orders To ISPs

In 1985 Margaret Thatcher gave a speech to the American Bar Association in which she said "we must try to find ways to starve the terrorist and the hijacker of the oxygen of publicity on which they depend". This led to a ban on broadcast of utterances by republican politicians supportive of the Provisional IRA, which in turn led to the absurd situation of news programmes showing video of politicians such as Gerry Adams speaking but with the audio replaced by an actor's voice.

It only drew attention to the extremist's cause, as will be the case here.

Comment: Re:I knew it (Score 1) 75

As it stands, are there any ISPs who don't subscribe to the IWF list? How hard would it be for one of us to start our own that doesn't subscribe to some unsupervised qango's blocklist?

Yes: my ISP, Andrews and Arnold Ltd. See http://www.aaisp.com/news-censorship.html. Getting fantastic 35Mbps (as measured by those speed test sites) FTTC as well!

Comment: Re:Bad things Happen in 3's (Score 1) 132

by Butterspoon (#35880028) Attached to: Doctor Who's Elisabeth Sladen (Sarah Jane) Dies at 63

I know it's fun to claim that the National Health Service is being privatised - but that doesn't make it true and it's not.

There is currently a strong focus in cancer care in the UK on early detection, which saves lives as well as money, though in some cases aggressive screening programmes have been found to do neither.

Comment: Whoa there (Score 1) 6

by Butterspoon (#28123549) Attached to: 16-year old solves the Bernoulli-sequence

Let's not get carried away here. First of all, I don't see any mention of "closed form" in the English version of the article.

Also, there's nothing concrete about what he's actually proved. "A formula". BFD. I can go to Mathworld and bring you back a bucketful.

Finally, if that's his formula on the board behind him in the photo, then it's full of sigmas and doesn't strictly count as closed-form anyway.

(Mind you, I'm sure what he has done is impressive for a 16-year-old. Tip of the hat to ya and all that, but this might be being hyped up a bit by people with other agendas.)

Comment: Re:Truecrypt (Score 1) 121

by Butterspoon (#27266533) Attached to: Windows Home Directory Encryption?

You can put "c:\Documents and Settings" in another folder name on a different partition but it's tricky for non-corporate users. You need to burn a copy of your installation CD with a custom OEMINFO.INI and partition your drive first.

I went to the trouble of doing this for my current Windows box and it works beautifully. Now I can reinstall the OS (on the C partition) to a clean state by dd'ing a tar.gz of it from a Live CD without clobbering my user data, and at the same time my backups are more focussed as I'm not bothering with C partition (think \windows and \program files), which I would be reinstalling from installers (and dd'ing, as above) in the event of a disaster.

Comment: Re:TrueCrypt is not noticeably slow. (Score 2, Informative) 121

by Butterspoon (#27266449) Attached to: Windows Home Directory Encryption?

TrueCrypt encrypted containers can be formatted as NTFS or FAT file systems. I haven't tried other file systems.

I can add ext3 to the list of filesystems known to work with TrueCrypt, useful for apps such as Nautilus and TightVNC that create files with colons in their name.

Also, although this is slightly off-topic, you can easily store a Linux home directory and mount it in place, i.e. just one big volume in /home/username which you can mount with

$ truecrypt -t volume.tc ~

and the full home directory replaces the previously empty directory.

The OP is asking for something similar on Windows but that's much trickier on NTFS and Windows for a variety of reasons - TrueCrypt still doesn't allow mounting at a junction point, and a directory used for this purpose must be empty, and by the time you've logged in, you've already got a lot of files open (e.g. your registry hive).

Comment: How to sell Win 7 to me (Score 1) 746

by Butterspoon (#26547335) Attached to: Is Microsoft Improving Its Image?

The critical non-selling point for me with Vista was the blatant market segmentation. Vista Home, Vista Home Premium, Vista Business, Vista Ultimate, Vista IE-free, Vista Lite, Vista Media Center, Vista This, Vista That. The only version you could count on to have the features you needed was Vista Ultimate, the most expensive by far. It was just a con, and I walked away from it because of that.

If Microsoft wants to avoid insulting its users, it should stick to one version, or if its bean-counters say it must, a normal version and a cheapo crippled version.

United States

+ - Will the US have to conduct more nuclear tests?

Submitted by
Matthew Sparkes
Matthew Sparkes writes "The US has selected the design for a controversial new nuclear warhead to replace the Cold War era weapons currently deployed in its submarines. However, critics say the existing bombs are good enough, and that developing new warheads gives entirely the wrong message at a time when the US is trying to control nuclear proliferation. Questions also remain about whether or not the new warhead will require nuclear tests."
Games

Serious, Indie, Mobile Games Highlight GDC Monday 10

Posted by Zonk
from the someone's-got-a-case-of-the-gdcs dept.
The first day of GDC is generally devoted to games just a bit off the beaten path. In recent years, serious games have vied with titles from the mobile and indie markets on the first two days of the Game Developer's Conference. Probably the most interesting serious discussion from Monday was word from Square/Enix's new serious games arm. Sessions like innovations in Indie games and how to get your Indie game published rounded out the independent games discussions for the day. The pirates at Three Rings also put on a good show, talking about how to make an indie MMOG. Meanwhile, on the mobile front, EA veteran Trip Hawkins talked about innovations on the smallest screen, while Nokia rolled out some new details on their next generation of N-Gage .

Commodore Returns with New Gaming PCs 281

Posted by Hemos
from the everything-old-is-new-again dept.
JamesO writes "Commodore is a name which will bring memories flooding back to many a gamer and it's been announced that the legendary brand is to return with a new range of high specification gaming PCs. The new Commodore PCs optimized for gaming will be launched at the CeBIT show in Germany on March 15 and attendees will be offered the chance to play the latest PC games using the purpose-built PCs."
Businesses

+ - Can the free market develop sustainable energies?

Submitted by
Basile Schaeli
Basile Schaeli writes "Jeff Vail provides an interesting take on why free markets may not solve the world's addiction to energy. From the article:

'Is free-market innovation the best way to develop viable, sustainable energy alternatives?
The free market will ignore solutions that can't turn a profit. Any firm that fails to follow this simple maxim won't be in business for long. The corollary to this maxim is that the free market will ignore any solution that cannot be controlled, either through property interests (enforceable intellectual property, monopoly licenses, etc.) or because economies of scale demand centralized operation. This means that free market innovation is structurally incompatible with a huge portion of the universe of possible energy solutions.'"
Microsoft

+ - Microsoft attack Google over 'fair use'

Submitted by Theendisnigh
Theendisnigh (1072348) writes "Quoted from the Guardian online: "Microsoft will today launch a blistering attack on Google, accusing the Silicon Valley giant of a "cavalier" attitude to copyright.
In a prepared speech to the American Association of Publishers, senior Microsoft lawyer Tom Rubin is expected to hit out at Google for profiting from other people's work.
"Companies that create no content of their own, and make money solely on the backs of other people's content, are raking in billions through advertising revenue and IPOs," he says."

Complete Guardian story available here."

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