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Comment: The oxygen of publicity (Score 2) 208

by Butterspoon (#45550185) Attached to: UK Gov't Plans To Censor "Extremist" Websites Via Orders To ISPs

In 1985 Margaret Thatcher gave a speech to the American Bar Association in which she said "we must try to find ways to starve the terrorist and the hijacker of the oxygen of publicity on which they depend". This led to a ban on broadcast of utterances by republican politicians supportive of the Provisional IRA, which in turn led to the absurd situation of news programmes showing video of politicians such as Gerry Adams speaking but with the audio replaced by an actor's voice.

It only drew attention to the extremist's cause, as will be the case here.

Comment: Re:I knew it (Score 1) 75

As it stands, are there any ISPs who don't subscribe to the IWF list? How hard would it be for one of us to start our own that doesn't subscribe to some unsupervised qango's blocklist?

Yes: my ISP, Andrews and Arnold Ltd. See http://www.aaisp.com/news-censorship.html. Getting fantastic 35Mbps (as measured by those speed test sites) FTTC as well!

Comment: Re:Bad things Happen in 3's (Score 1) 132

by Butterspoon (#35880028) Attached to: Doctor Who's Elisabeth Sladen (Sarah Jane) Dies at 63

I know it's fun to claim that the National Health Service is being privatised - but that doesn't make it true and it's not.

There is currently a strong focus in cancer care in the UK on early detection, which saves lives as well as money, though in some cases aggressive screening programmes have been found to do neither.

Sci-Fi

Ask Slashdot: How/Where To Start Watching Dr. Who? 655

Posted by timothy
from the very-carefully-31-years-ago dept.
stinkfish writes "I am a big fan of science fiction, especially good TV science fiction. For some reason Dr. Who is a show I have watched very little of. My question to Slashdot is, whats the best strategy for enjoying this classic show? Looking at the wikipedia page on Dr. who, I see there are 11 Doctors, so is hard to pick a good starting point. If it was just up to me, I would start watching from the very beginning. But I know my wife would not watch a show that dated, though she is a science fiction fan herself and enjoyed a few seasons of Torchwood. So where do I start? Here's an article on this topic; is there more to say?"

Comment: Whoa there (Score 1) 6

by Butterspoon (#28123549) Attached to: 16-year old solves the Bernoulli-sequence

Let's not get carried away here. First of all, I don't see any mention of "closed form" in the English version of the article.

Also, there's nothing concrete about what he's actually proved. "A formula". BFD. I can go to Mathworld and bring you back a bucketful.

Finally, if that's his formula on the board behind him in the photo, then it's full of sigmas and doesn't strictly count as closed-form anyway.

(Mind you, I'm sure what he has done is impressive for a 16-year-old. Tip of the hat to ya and all that, but this might be being hyped up a bit by people with other agendas.)

Windows

Windows 7 Launch Date Leaked — 23 Oct. 2009 127

Posted by kdawson
from the loose-lips-sink-software dept.
Sockatume writes "Yesterday, two Acer executives in Europe separately let slip details that give us a good date for the release of Windows 7. First, Acer's vice-president for Europe discussed a new product, launching this September, that will support Windows 7's touch features. Asked whether this confirmed the Windows 7 release date as September 2009, he coyly remarked that 'when it's in store it won't have Windows 7 pre-loaded.' Microsoft would probably prefer that he had stopped there, but he added: 'We won't be actually selling [Windows 7] a day before the 23rd October.' Then, Acer's Managing Director for the UK helpfully clarified that while their product will ship with Windows Vista at launch, because it is on sale less than 30 days before the Windows 7 release date, it will be eligible for the 'upgrade program' to get a free upgrade to the new OS."
Power

Yeast-Powered Fuel Cell Feeds On Human Blood 250

Posted by timothy
from the because-you-need-some-serious-news-too dept.
holy_calamity writes "Canadian researchers have taken a sensible, if slightly creepy, step towards solving the problem of medical implant batteries running down. They've built a fuel cell powered by yeast that feed on the glucose in human blood. If this makes it into people, keeping your implants going will be as simple as eating a donut."

Comment: Re:Truecrypt (Score 1) 121

by Butterspoon (#27266533) Attached to: Windows Home Directory Encryption?

You can put "c:\Documents and Settings" in another folder name on a different partition but it's tricky for non-corporate users. You need to burn a copy of your installation CD with a custom OEMINFO.INI and partition your drive first.

I went to the trouble of doing this for my current Windows box and it works beautifully. Now I can reinstall the OS (on the C partition) to a clean state by dd'ing a tar.gz of it from a Live CD without clobbering my user data, and at the same time my backups are more focussed as I'm not bothering with C partition (think \windows and \program files), which I would be reinstalling from installers (and dd'ing, as above) in the event of a disaster.

Comment: Re:TrueCrypt is not noticeably slow. (Score 2, Informative) 121

by Butterspoon (#27266449) Attached to: Windows Home Directory Encryption?

TrueCrypt encrypted containers can be formatted as NTFS or FAT file systems. I haven't tried other file systems.

I can add ext3 to the list of filesystems known to work with TrueCrypt, useful for apps such as Nautilus and TightVNC that create files with colons in their name.

Also, although this is slightly off-topic, you can easily store a Linux home directory and mount it in place, i.e. just one big volume in /home/username which you can mount with

$ truecrypt -t volume.tc ~

and the full home directory replaces the previously empty directory.

The OP is asking for something similar on Windows but that's much trickier on NTFS and Windows for a variety of reasons - TrueCrypt still doesn't allow mounting at a junction point, and a directory used for this purpose must be empty, and by the time you've logged in, you've already got a lot of files open (e.g. your registry hive).

Comment: How to sell Win 7 to me (Score 1) 746

by Butterspoon (#26547335) Attached to: Is Microsoft Improving Its Image?

The critical non-selling point for me with Vista was the blatant market segmentation. Vista Home, Vista Home Premium, Vista Business, Vista Ultimate, Vista IE-free, Vista Lite, Vista Media Center, Vista This, Vista That. The only version you could count on to have the features you needed was Vista Ultimate, the most expensive by far. It was just a con, and I walked away from it because of that.

If Microsoft wants to avoid insulting its users, it should stick to one version, or if its bean-counters say it must, a normal version and a cheapo crippled version.

Comment: Re:Outlaw encryption (Score 2, Informative) 545

by Butterspoon (#26080851) Attached to: UK Cops Want "Breathalyzers" For PCs

Assuming you are in the UK, then yes, you would go to jail for doing that. Even forgetting the key is illegal, so deliberately destroying it would probably get you an increased sentence.

No, genuinely forgetting a key is legal, but you have to convince the court that you really forgot it and aren't just saying so. (Could be tricky...)

"If I do not want others to quote me, I do not speak." -- Phil Wayne

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