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Comment Re:They tried it before. (Score 1) 102 102

GPL means open source. Means you, I, and Frank down the road can download and read the source. We can compile it ourselves from the source, to make sure we have what we expect. We can inspect the code to discover back doors (hiding a direct back-door in source is REALLY REALLY hard to do) - crypto experts in this or other countries can look through it to ascertain if it is secure or subject to attacks (theses have been based on this, so it is no idle task)

In fact no one with any standing in the cryto community of experts will say any crypto algorithm is anything but *insecure* until the whole world has tried to break it, and all fail.

Good crypto is possible. GPL means open source, so good crypto applications *are* possible. Anything close sourced, i.e. commercial or government furnished, as binary only, cannot be trusted.

That is why GPL is so important. It isn't magical, but no one can muck with it in secret. Just isn't physically possible - you get the source code too.

Comment Re:Need to be adjustable (Score 1) 340 340

Do you have control of the (local) AC? I ask because you could crank it up in south Florida, and basically force yourself to take a walk outside every so often just to 'thaw out your bones'.

I used to do that in college when I was doing track and cross country - my body got so good at dumping heat I was freezing every day in normal temperature classrooms.

Comment Re:The 90's all over again... (Score 1) 151 151

Hmm.... That sounds like 90% of a hit TV series premise to me. Just add "and solving ingenious crimes that baffle the police" to that story and I thing we have it.

Good for you for having the wit to not believe what you were told and the fortitude to get to college anyway.

Comment Re:Tacking around the moon (Score 1) 72 72

Actually, from what I understand it's the resistance of the keel that lets a sailing ship tack into the wind. The keel is long and thin seen from the front and wide and flat seen from the side - so in one sense it is water resistance, but its resistance of sideways motion vs. front to back motion. A flat bottomed rowboat can't tack even if you add sails - no keel. Learned that from Peabody and Sherman a few centuries ago.

Comment Re:Security is a process - not a tool (Score 1) 203 203

As one old hand on /. to another - hats off to you sir if even half of what you said is accurate (and I have a suspicion it is). It was once called civic duty, but is sorely missing today.

Nothing gets peoples attention like the unmistakable "crunch-crunch!" of a shotgun being primed, I imagine. I have no guns myself, but I would still step out with whatever was at hand if a situation similar to the ones you describe above occurred.

It's refreshing to hear of someone with the same outlook. Bless you sir!

Comment Re:other states? (Score 1) 69 69

Simple enough - nuclear warheads wear out. They get stale, They cease to function. They must be replaced.

The US had millions of rounds of 50 caliber machine gun ammo left after WWII - enough to last through all the wars since then. Is that stock still around? No - it was destroyed and replaced with fresh ammo. Same deal with nukes - they are not a solid block of stone, so they do no last forever. No complex weapon does.

Comment Re:Fluffy the feel good piece (Score 1) 70 70

I got fed up with the 4 and 5 blade contraptions as well, and went back 'old school' with a safety razor, soap, and boars-hair brush. Didn't go full old school with the straight razor - that does take too much time to keep sharp, and some time to get skilled with it. The safety razor though is great - blades are maybe 4 cents a piece - I can buy 'em in hundred packs.

Try it - you won't look back.

The one advantage modern razors have though is that you have to really really try hard to cut yourself. The safety I have is not bad (and blades last around 2 weeks it seems), but takes a little care. Straight razor - forget about it.

Comment Re:They still have to add more risk to the equatio (Score 1) 99 99

How about this for a potential solution? NIH, as federally funded, cannot or will not patent new devices you (and other researchers) come up with. Fine. How about sending copies of your writings directly to the Patent board - for inclusion in the body of prior art they use to reject patents.

That may be one way to put them in the public domain, so to speak, so that companies could USE your design, but could not patent it for themselves - any patent application would just get rejected via prior art.

May be worth a shot.

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