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Comment: Re:Sweet, sweet solipsism (Score 1) 12

by kesuki (#47735187) Attached to: Why Ferguson Is Just the Beginning of Future America

we are the giant robotic overlords. why do you think our baby memories are so rare and fade so fast? because from nanolathing in the womb the networking of the mind is started by the mother, and we go from instant nerve based signals to no signal at all when the cord is cut. then we crash and learn how to wirelessly communicate, and at first there is no questioning of any adult action as the nural matrix is still growing, because mothers are so burdened with the duties they perform as mothers, rather than a perfect bit for bit copy which wouldn't work anyways our massively parallel brains generate and discard data to make room for new programming. besides most mothers want to enjoy their childrens lives, and the best extension of that is not by a bit for bit copy so much as a slow interface such as sensory organs, to gradually run across the reality engine of the mind. i have made my own mind crash, i experienced it first hand at an adult mind, where i could attempt to record the thoughts.

i even had extra pyramidal symptoms, and the messages were fast and i didn't have internet access from a device so i was stuck using the fast connection where realities floated across my mind and everything people were trying to tell me was being directly drawn to my nural network. they really really tried to get the extrapyramidal symptoms into my head but i was so busy doing things it had not been digested information.

on a routine basis i see people doing things that they could only know about from supposedly secure sources. i write things sometimes that cause the whole of my reality tremble, and if i need something reality soon finds a way for me to get it. if i want a thing it is a bit harder than if i don't 'need' it usually i have to do things my family wants because they know me better, and are more likely to help me if i help them some way.

don't you remember the time i got the superbowl up to halftime charted out a week before the big game and was rather vague about the end of the game? how did that data 'happen' to fit in my mind? why do people tell me not to talk about the internet to their children as they are not ready for their kids to know what an internet is.

why do i know that a non monolithic designed cpu on silicon is a mere 40ghz while companies sell between 1.2ghz and 5.0ghz (with water cooling) hmm i don't read the articles myself...

Comment: Re:Bricking or Tracking? (Score 2) 297

so government a key portion of civilization is no longer needed once our corporate overlords take their place? and these $800 com devices that have $160 worth of parts every 18 months is better than taxes how? oh and hey the phone company will drop the price $200 if only you agree to pay $15 a month more cause a $600 phone is more affordable than if you pay $280 over time. sure there are pay as you go wireless... but they are carried in some markets they don't have towers in. same for contract based phones they will sign you up happily even if their computer says they have no towers where you live. because once the ink is there its final you have to pay.

the point of the government is to protect the people from companies and it has sadly failed many times many ways. lung black from coal miners goes untreated despite federal laws where are the government acting about that? obama care has the potential of killing a $3 billion dollar a year of fraudulent medical payments but no those are 'easy' jobs for the wealthy to profit off the suffering of the poor, so we can't let the program actually work now can we?

bleh

technology doesn't kill the need for government especially when it comes from corporations. the free market you say? then clearly they buy low sell high. even if granny freezes to death because propane went up in price when her social security payment went down. and IT IS REAL http://kstp.com/article/stories/s3313632.shtml

the problem isn't that the government is too big, it is that it has not been doing it's job and is now more worried about how to keep the rich rich while allowing as many companies to be free of pesky regulations like preserving the quality of our water and air.

Comment: Re: Would be awesome (Score 2) 690

by kesuki (#47715745) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

What really kills open source is that it doesn't have a functional GUI or a dearth of useful apps. It is because it doesn't have what marketing is looking for, vendor lock in for not giving competitors access to the same tools/data sets. It doesn't guarantee high profits, on low margins. It doesn't offer a user base of clueless clickers, who will pay because everyone else is charging for software, and think software means paying money...

Comment: Re:Amost sounds like a good deal ... (Score 1) 376

by kesuki (#47700485) Attached to: Rightscorp's New Plan: Hijack Browsers Until Infingers Pay Up

remind me how many dollars sony was sued for over the walkman.

remind me how much has apple had to pay for illegal downloaded music playing on ipods.

the internet is a service, and with net neutrality it is not up to the isp to issue a court order to stop the infringement. they are not a court. neither is these stupid companies who harass people for using bittorrent or jigdo or ftp for crying out loud. the DMCA has clauses for takedown notices which the isp is allowed to essentially ignore unless the burden of proof is achieved. which these companies don't care about. this is shakedown money. and without net neutrality it is a forgone conclusion that to use the internet will require shakedown money for all future generations.

Comment: Re:I've learned the hard way (Score 1) 303

"I've learned the hard way over the years. Never let Windows Update install a driver of any kind. Ever.

I've had them blow out network cards, video cards, sound cards, and low level on-board devices. I've had them completely bork systems to the point where they were unbootable. "

thats not a bug, thats a feature... you've heard of vendor lockin and planned obsolescence...

Comment: Re:No, you don't need AV, even on Windows (Score 1, Interesting) 331

by kesuki (#47690361) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Dead Is Antivirus, Exactly?

sounds like we've got an Id ten T error.

thing is, i've seen $100 a fix computer security professionals unable to remove a virus.

i removed the administrator privileges from said user and the malware couldn't reinstall itself. funny thing about windows is that making a new user account prevents many reinfection scenarios, yet a $100 a fix professional tries to fix it with tools that wont install properly because a malware is reinstalling every boot up.

they infected the keyboard controller on the laptop somehow too, so i used a new $10 usb keyboard to fix that because i didn't want to replace the whole keyboard, and made it so that the id ten t user would have to enter a password to install a program, and would have to use a password to remove the anti virus which i wrote down and didn't give to them. they also though youtube movie links were 'purchasing' movies so i did what i could and washed my hands of the situation.

Comment: Re:Patch Tuesday updates (Score 2) 179

by kesuki (#47673435) Attached to: Microsoft Black Tuesday Patches Bring Blue Screens of Death

here, http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/ download, put to usb media... use BIOS to set usb and/or dvd to boot before the hdd. then boot and fix MBR then roll back updates. you can ever use the boot cd to replace the bad files using the copy on your boot dvd (just google the guides i'm lazy)

Comment: Re:Sounds smart, but is it? (Score 1) 125

If you want to look into revolutionary design changes look into the Mill CPU architecture.

They've put their lecture series available on the web about their intended architecture - it's kinda a hybrid DSP / general purpose with some neat side steps of contemporary CPU architectures.

You can measure a programmer's perspective by noting his attitude on the continuing viability of FORTRAN. -- Alan Perlis

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