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Comment Re:Spare us the hype (Score 1) 93

If they need insect pollinators, they'll make sure they have insect pollinators in the right quantity, with the right pollinating ability, to make their crop a success.

I never knew that nut farmers had such godlike powers.

I wonder why they're not using those powers right now to bring the perfect amount of rain to California, though.

Comment Re:... and here on slashdot? (Score 1) 231

they didn't feel it was worth while to put any additional money into the code, ever again

Not true. Just recently they came dangerously close to completely ruining this site with an investment in new code. Thankfully, they backed down.

The truth of the matter is, there is no reason to upgrade the code. In fact, I'd prefer if they reverted to one of the older versions from earlier years that has fewer "Web 2.0" stunts and just serves up the damned text.

Comment Re:Typing versus Reading (Score 5, Interesting) 304

On the other hand, students and people in-general have gotten > and < confused for a long time.

Many decades ago, my first grade teacher explained that these symbols are like alligators: They choose to chomp on the bigger meal. I've never been confused on these symbols since that day.

Comment Re:Part of why farmers hate DST is Cows doing that (Score 1) 252

I think you missed the point entirely.

It's actually daylight when the sun comes up, and that's all the cows care about.

Too bad we don't, but instead we try to pretend that what time a clock says on it matters in some way beyond what time a clock says it is.

For the 99.9% of us who aren't dairy farmers, the time on the clock does dictate our schedule and the exact timing of the sunrise is irrelevant.

Given that, it makes more sense to adjust the clock time twice per year than continuously tweak 300,000,000 individual schedules.

Comment Re:How embarrassing (Score 4, Insightful) 157

No we don't. That's just media propaganda.

It's the damned truth. Look it up. It looks like you've been fed on a diet of too much talk radio propaganda yourself.

We eliminate the cost of insurance premiums by getting rid of the ridiculous cost structure of health care in this country. There are dozens of countries who already do this just fine, and the people there live longer and healthier lives. This isn't rocket science.

Comment Re:How embarrassing (Score 2) 157

We would have to seriously jack up the tax rate in order to pay for something like that.

We shouldn't have to. We already spend twice as much per capita on health care than any other country, with worse outcomes. Half of our health care system is already socialized (Medicare/Medicaid). That means if we could just get costs and quality in line with the rest of the world, we could cover everyone, get better results, and eliminate all private insurance premiums using no more tax money than we're already spending.

Comment Re:Unions for interchangeable. Don't want 50% pay (Score 1) 177

A software developers union would presumably be in a good position to shake off the ways of the past. They could apply some basic 21st-century tech to the situation.

What if they instituted a feedback system where clients rate the developers? Then the hourly rates could vary based on the capabilities of each individual.

If you had the entire union vouching for you as their top "rockstar" developer, maybe you could get even higher pay rates than you could by just tooting your horn on your own.

Comment Re:Open source & locked down... (Score 1) 173

Umm.... What about the MIT and BSD licenses? They don't have a clause requiring the release of source when delivered in binary form. Do you not consider these licenses to be open source?

If the BSD-licensed binary software was shipped unmodified, then you still have access to the upstream release, and it's still open source.

If modifications were made, then a binary derivative work was shipped. If a proprietary license has been added to the derivative work or the source modifications are kept secret, then the derivative work is not open source. (But the original unmodified code that it was based on remains open source.)

No problem is so formidable that you can't just walk away from it. -- C. Schulz