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Comment: Re:Why scary? (Score 2) 107

by PPH (#48215027) Attached to: 6,000 Year Old Temple Unearthed In Ukraine

Imputing some sort of religious/magic interpretations onto other cultures' tools and customs seems to be a problem with our anthropologists.

I remember years ago, they came up with a bunch of theories about how the Rapa Nui moved their Moai stone sculptures from the quarries to their current locations. When asked, the descendents just said, "They walked". So the anthropologists wrote that off as some sort of mysticism and theorized about rollers and dragging.

Then, someone asked, "What do you mean by 'walked'?". The islanders said they stood the statues up, tied ropes to them and rocked them back and forth, while leaning them forward. Much the same as you'd move a heavy appliance. The scientists tried it as an experiment and it worked.

Comment: Re:Maybe you can't (Score 1) 247

by PPH (#48213269) Attached to: Michigan Latest State To Ban Direct Tesla Sales

Or people do something similar to what many do in my state (Washington). They register them in a low tax state (Oregon). Of course, state law says one must register a vehicle in WA state when one resides there. But this asumes a cooperative DMV. If they turned people away, the cars would continue to be registered out of state.

Comment: Re:Telecommuting is now a real thing (Score 1) 285

by PPH (#48213211) Attached to: Will Fiber-To-the-Home Create a New Digital Divide?

Get off my lawn, kid! In my day, we used to have 50 people at meetings, easy. There was an entire parallel org chart of people who lived for nothing other then going to meetings. It was how they justified their existance to their boss and stayed out of sight, so as not to raise questions about what they actually did. But try to assign them any action items at a meeting and listen to the whining.

Fast forward to a world of fiber broadband. Telecommunters can participate in multiple video links simultaneously. A couple of corporate drones can do the work of dozens of actual warm bodies. The demand for MBAs will collapse and take our employment rate and economy down with it.

Comment: Re:Also (Score 1) 285

by PPH (#48213067) Attached to: Will Fiber-To-the-Home Create a New Digital Divide?

Speed matters less with each step up.

This.

The Frontier salesman stopped by my house a few months ago to get me to sign up. He said they were going to be doubling their FiOS speed in the next few months for the same price. I asked him if they had a package offering the existing speed for half the price. He just looked at me as if I was from a different planet (I am, but that's discussion for another thread).

Upon perusing their offering, I find that the offered price requires me to sign up for a 'qualified' phone package (Don't need it. I have VoIP service.), and an Internet service package (streaming TV plus some other crap I've already got, no doubt). The result is going to cost me around $100/month. No thanks. I've got a wimpy 5Mb/s now. But that runs everything I need just fine. For about $20/month.

If I really want to shut down the salespeople fast, when they tell me about their Internet service package, I always say, "Of course, that includes Usenet, right?" Again with the extraterrestrial look.

Comment: Re:Maybe you can't (Score 1) 247

by PPH (#48209755) Attached to: Michigan Latest State To Ban Direct Tesla Sales

Title and registration are two different things.

This.

You go out of state*, buy your Tesla and receive the title. You then either get a temporary operating permit to drive it home. Or load it on a truck. When you arrive in Michigan, you register the vehicle with the title documents in your possession.

*All done virtually. You do the paperwork wherever you want (in the Tesla showroom) but it is effective in whatever state you and Tesla agree on.

Comment: Re:Single Point Failure (Score 1) 115

by PPH (#48206011) Attached to: Software Glitch Caused 911 Outage For 11 Million People

Actually there are mirrored data centers

OK. That fixes an event that can take one data center out*. But why mirrored? Why aren't these systems distributed and colocated with the municipalities that they serve? And why a globally unique call ID that overflows at 4E7 records?

* I helped develop a system that achieved its reliability through the use of distributed servers. And then had the IT people put all the servers in one rack, in one building. For cost savings, of course. The building sits right on top of the Seattle fault. So you'll have to excuse me when I don't take details like this for granted.

Comment: Single Point Failure (Score 1) 115

by PPH (#48204375) Attached to: Software Glitch Caused 911 Outage For 11 Million People

For 911 services in 7 states? Set aside issues about the backup system for the moment (which may be a second server in the same data center): Why do all the 911 calls have to funnel through a single system? Emergency services are largely local. Not many people have to make 911 calls across a large region. So why isn't the energency call routing handled by local systems? And calls routed to local service centers?

Even if there was a common software glitch in all the handling systems, I doubt everyone would hit some call limit in a database field simultaneously.

There's a whole WORLD in a mud puddle! -- Doug Clifford

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