Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Google

+ - Behind the "My Location" Errors in Google ->

Submitted by
waderoush
waderoush writes "Ever since Google added the "My Location" feature this week to the desktop and laptop version of Google Maps, allowing Firefox and Chrome users to see their current location on a map, people have been reporting bizarre location errors — Manhattanites, for example, are being told by Google that they're in Austin, TX. Ted Morgan, the CEO of Boston-based location software provider Skyhook Wireless, talked about the problems in an interview Friday. Skyhook's Wi-Fi-based location-finding technology was passed over when Mozilla adopted Google's own location services toolkit for Firefox 3.5 in April; Morgan says that was unfortunate for Web app developers, because Google's "crowdsourced" database of Wi-Fi access point locations is far less reliable than Skyhook's."
Link to Original Source
Data Storage

+ - Padlock USB Flash Drive, Built-In Security Keypad

Submitted by
MojoKid
MojoKid writes "With data and identity theft so prevalent today, an ever increasing number of users are concerned about securing their personal data. Memory manufacturer, Corsair just launched a new product that may hold the key to easy and convenient data security, literally and figuratively. The Corsair Flash Padlock functions much like any other USB thumbdrive, but it features a built-in keypad for entering a PIN code that locks or unlocks the data stored on the device. Without the PIN, the data cannot be accessed. This article highlights the main features of the Corsair Flash Padlock and profiles its performance. The product certainly works as advertised, but transfer speeds aren't stellar."
Businesses

+ - Open Source: Selling software that sells itself->

Submitted by
mrcgran
mrcgran writes "LinuxWorld is running an insightful interview: "Open source is changing not just how companies make software, but how they sell it. Alfresco's Matt Asay explains the new sales cycle and the skills that today's software sales people need to close deals ... 'But you know what? We have worked with Microsoft on interop without doing any sort of a patent deal; as has Sugar and MySQL and Zend and these other companies. We work directly with Microsoft for a customer of ours to insure SQL Server integration with Alfresco. Didn't have to sign any patent deal with them to get that done. We both had a mutual customer. It was in our mutual interest. We both wanted to make money, therefore we did it. But the patent thing is a complete smoke and mirrors, I don't want to say trick, but it has nothing to do with interoperability. No matter how much Microsoft may repeat that, it has nothing to do with interoperability.' " Be sure also to check out their open source survey on 10000 enterprises with interesting insights and data."
Link to Original Source
Portables (Games)

+ - DS 'Brain Game' Banned in UK->

Submitted by
janitorj
janitorj writes "According to this BBC article, the Nintendo DS puzzler 'MindQuiz' was banned from UK shelves. The woman in the story, whose father and son both had Cerebral Palsy, contacted a BBC radio program to report that she "was shocked when she had performed poorly at one part of the game and it rated her efforts in a manner derogatory to the disabled.""
Link to Original Source
Microsoft

+ - Microsoft wants review of Google/Doubleclick deal

Submitted by LMFAO
LMFAO (666) writes "Microsoft, a veteran defendant of epic antitrust battles in the United States and Europe, is urging regulators to consider scuttling Google's plan to buy DoubleClick, an online advertising company. Bradford L. Smith, Microsoft's general counsel, said in an interview yesterday that Google's purchase of DoubleClick would combine the two largest online advertising distributors and thus "substantially reduce competition in the advertising market on the Web." — New York Times"
Media

Proving Creative Commons Licensing of a Work? 105

Posted by Cliff
from the submarine-license-changes dept.
Q7U asks: "I recently posted a few Creative Commons licensed photographs from Flickr on one of my websites. I later noticed that one of the photographers had retroactively switched all of his photos from the Creative Commons license to an 'All Right Reserved' notice. When I saw this I went ahead and removed his photo (even though I understand that CC licenses are perpetual unless violated), but this begs the question: How does one prove one obtained a work under a Creative Commons license, should there ever be a dispute between a creator and the licensee? Is a simple screenshot of the webpage where it was offered proof enough? Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated."

Pound for pound, the amoeba is the most vicious animal on earth.

Working...