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Comment Re:Well d'oh! (Score 1) 109

From that article:

Yet all the chemical weapons found by soldiers were manufactured before 1991, the Times reported. They consisted largely of 155-millimeter artillery shells or 122-millimeter rockets – not designed for mass destruction, and produced in the 1980s during the Iran-Iraq war.

According to the Times, the reports were embarrassing for the Pentagon because, in five of the six incidents in which troops were wounded by chemical agents, the munitions appeared to have been “designed in the US, manufactured in Europe and filled in chemical agent production lines built in Iraq by Western companies”.

Comment Re:Altitude only first (Score 1) 132

So, kudos to Blue Origin for reaching the edge of space with a previously-used rocket (something nobody else has done with the arguable exception of Shuttle, which was really never the same twice).

Actually Scaled Composites performed the same feat over 10 years ago, don't you remember the X-Prize? They use different launch and landing methods, but right now Blue Origin is at the same point that Scaled Composites were back in 2004.

Comment Re: Great! (Score 1) 338

Constantly failing LED bulbs? Ah, let me guess! You bought the cheapest, crappiest LED bulbs you could find, right? 4 years ago I replaced every halogen spotlight (28 of them) in my home with LED equivalents. They were the more expensive Panasonic bulbs, but so far I've not had a single one fail, not even in the bathroom where they're subject to large temperature and humidity swings. They're dimmable, the colour temperature is indistinguishable from the halogen bulbs they replaced, and I could have every single light on and use less energy than a single room did before.

I have had one LED bulb fail before, a cheap crappy "golf ball" bulb. As ever you get what you pay for.

Comment Re: Well deserved. (Score 5, Insightful) 540

As a firearms owner and carrier (30+ years of EDC) I would never, ever want a fingerprint reader or interlock on any of my firearms. When I pull the trigger, I want it to go bang, period.

Going a bit off topic, but if your gun was instead in the hands of your son or daughter pointing it at themselves or others I bet you'd like it to not go bang. Gun suicide and misuse using family owned guns is a much bigger problem than self defense unless you live in an unusually dangerous neighborhood, and before you say they can commit suicide another way studies in the UK after it switched from poisonous coal gas to safe natural gas shows the overall suicide rate falls if you take away an easy suicide method (no more "sticking your head in the oven")

Comment I haven't had flu in years either (Score 1) 206

I call bullshit. How could an extremophile that's highly adapted for cold temperatures not only survive in the elevated temperature of a mammal body, not only evade the mammal adaptive immune system that is so effective diseases have to be highly specialised to defeat it, not only have any kind of physiological effect, but a positive one too?

Comment Re:WHY?!? (Score 1) 66

Basically one is weighing an approximately 1 in 100 chance a hacker getting in from an injection attack versus roughly a 1 in 5 chance that scrubbing will create practical problems for legitimate users (considering all the data collected from multiple sources and fields over time).

What practical problem could treating something like a user agent string as a raw string value possibly cause?

Comment Re:They should have gone in '69 (Score 1) 242

Then Stanley Kubrick's footage of freemasonic astronauts jumping around the Nevada desert would be broadcast via the controlled mainstream media and be portrayed to the world as a successful moon landing.

Hold on now, you can triangulate that shit. So they'd clearly have had to soft land a communications relay on the moon and have it take off again to make sure the broadcast signal was coming from where it's supposed to. Oh and also have some kind of robotic arm to place those retro-reflectors in the right place and pointing in the right direction too.

Hmm, it's starting to sound quite hard, especially with the communication delay and limited computing power available at the time. Maybe it would be easier to stick some humans in there to pilot the thing themselves? We could give them space suites so they could just get out and place the reflectors by hand too!

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