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Xbox for Stroke Rehabilitation 147

An anonymous reader writes "Using an Xbox modified to run Linux, researchers have developed virtual reality hand exercises for rehabilitating stroke patients. An inexpensive glove controller is used to interact with the Xbox. The hardware cost is a tenth of a comparable commercial hand rehabilitation system, leading to the possibility of deployment in patients' homes."
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Xbox for Stroke Rehabilitation

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  • Great job... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 07, 2006 @01:38AM (#16057712)
    ... too bad it's a violation of the DMCA.

    *shakes head and walks away in shame*
  • Re:Why an Xbox? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Al Dimond (792444) on Thursday September 07, 2006 @01:50AM (#16057740) Journal
    I'm guessing they like that all Xboxen have the same exact hardware, whereas all old PCs don't. This way they can just create one Linux image and slap it on all the Xboxen without worrying about differences in hardware compatibility and performance wasting all their time.
  • Uh-Oh! (Score:2, Insightful)

    by NightDragon (732139) on Thursday September 07, 2006 @02:56AM (#16057883)
    Hey, they could get in big trouble for that! its illegal to run linux on X-box! Those unscroupulus pigs!

    Oh, wait... Except that there are big technological advances to be made out there, but researchers all across the USA are scared to death that they are gonna violate a IP law (such as the DCMA) and be whisked to jail, be sued, or worse.

    I love the fact that these guys didnt let a little thing like a federal law stop them from inventing a solution that can help millions of people worldwide. They deserve a big kudos.

    IP Laws that stifile scientific progress and humanitarian advances? Naw, never!

    Why do we have to live in a country where intellectual property and B.S. politics are put before scientific research and advancement?

    shame on you, congress.
  • Re:Great job... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by donaldm (919619) on Thursday September 07, 2006 @03:19AM (#16057921)
    Unfortunately you are right. Microsoft has no chance of making any profit by selling games for this modification it is purely a loss for them and to add insult the software is running under Linux.

    If Microsoft takes the developers to court, they could win legally but could end up with a public relations nightmare, so they will most likely ignore it since they do have very deep pockets.

    The only thing I can see come of this is Microsoft phases out the Xbox more quickly and this of course is going to get developers and gamers offside and that may play in favour of Nintendo and Sony and since Sony has made some major stuff-ups lately they will need every bit of help they can get. At least the PS2 is still a very viable and profitable console for vendors and consumers alike.
  • Re:Wouldn't... (Score:2, Insightful)

    by D4MO (78537) on Thursday September 07, 2006 @05:16AM (#16058163)

    Inaccurate, pehaps. Mistakes, possibly. Fear Uncertainty Doubt it was not.
  • by LaughingCoder (914424) on Thursday September 07, 2006 @06:50AM (#16058364)
    The irony of "free markets" is that the less regulation the worse they perform.

    Interesting. As one who has worked in the heavily regulated medical device industry, one of my favorite sayings that I utter frequently (especially when a really good idea gets squashed for "regulatory reasons") is "The more you regulate a business, the worse its products become."

    I have a huge number of examples that demonstrate the truth of this statement (don't get me started). Now, that said, I agree that a completely unfettered market breeds a different kind of problem. So what are we to conclude? As in most things, the "sweet spot" is somewhere in the middle. Of course, that means you must be willing to accept mild doses of the "negative" from the two extremes. In return you get to enjoy some of the "positives" of the two extremes. I look at it like balancing your portfolio in investing terms.

Artificial intelligence has the same relation to intelligence as artificial flowers have to flowers. -- David Parnas