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FAA Grants RSC Status to Linux-Friendly RTOS 99

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the still-can't-agree-what-real-time-computing-is dept.
BoulderDad writes "LinuxDevices.com is reporting that a proprietary RTOS capable of running Linux binaries has been certified by the FAA as a re-usable software component (RSC). LynuxWorks says LynxOS-178's RSC acceptance will enable greater software reuse among integrators and developers of safety-critical aerospace and defense components."
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FAA Grants RSC Status to Linux-Friendly RTOS

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  • Acronym overload (Score:3, Informative)

    by Life700MB (930032) on Monday March 20, 2006 @07:17PM (#14960750)

    * FAA [google.com].
    * RTOS [google.com]


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  • Re:NGTH (Score:3, Informative)

    by Valar (167606) on Monday March 20, 2006 @07:24PM (#14960795)
    You know, there is an actual vendor selling this, right? As in, there is a company that sells it, that you could go to if something goes wrong.
  • Re:Darn Acronyms (Score:3, Informative)

    by misleb (129952) on Monday March 20, 2006 @07:24PM (#14960800)
    If you think IT uses a lot of acronyms, aviation is 10x worse.

    Want a weather report?

    KPWK 202253Z 04015KT 10SM SKC 01/M06 A3018

    -matthew
  • Re:NGTH (Score:2, Informative)

    by JesseMcDonald (536341) on Monday March 20, 2006 @07:28PM (#14960820) Homepage
    I hope that you weren't implying that LynxOS-178 was "written by the public" -- the summary and the article were both indicated that LynxOS is a proprietary RTOS capable of running binaries compiled for Linux. Despite the name (LynuxWorks), the system is not derived from Linux in any way.
  • Re:NGTH (Score:5, Informative)

    by Fly (18255) on Monday March 20, 2006 @07:29PM (#14960835) Homepage
    I think he must be referring to the applications, not the OS itsef. LynxOS is not Linux. It's proprietary real-time OS that can run Linux applications. The LynxOS itself is backed by the vendor, and it's pretty good from what I hear. However, the applications built on it depend on the skill of the application developers, not the OS vendor.
  • Re:NGTH (Score:3, Informative)

    by WindBourne (631190) on Monday March 20, 2006 @07:43PM (#14960897) Journal
    Derived? No. Use the same code that Linux uses? Yes. The core kernel is mostly their work. But the API and all the supporting tools are mostly from GNU/Linux.
  • Re:Actually. . . (Score:2, Informative)

    by Sqwubbsy (723014) on Monday March 20, 2006 @08:26PM (#14961080) Homepage Journal
    Actually, anagrams are when you create a word or words out of another word or words' letters.
  • And pricing... (Score:4, Informative)

    by sadr (88903) <skg@sadr.com> on Monday March 20, 2006 @08:50PM (#14961176)
    And a little research turns up per-developer pricing, although not the per-unit run-time license cost. That's not actually unreasonable, given the cost of DO-178B Level A documentation, but still. Ouch.
    Price and Availability
    In addition to the LynxOS-178 kernel, the offering also includes a complete artifacts package for the kernel and user library, DO-178B required documentation, code coverage test suites and analysis for 100% modified condition/decision coverage of the kernel and libraries, a full suite of standards-based development tools, and support. The company will also soon release the industry's first commercial-off-the-shelf certifiable TCP/IP stack. Development seats, including the LynxOS-178 kernel and one year of priority support, start at $18,000.
  • Re:NGTH (Score:3, Informative)

    by PPGMD (679725) on Monday March 20, 2006 @08:53PM (#14961186) Journal
    Huh? Ghee thats why we have GPS approaches?

    Just about anything permanently mounted to an aircraft requires FAA approval, most early GPSs were not IFR approved, but now almost all panel mount GPSs have certification for enroute navigation, and many have approval for approach use (on GPS approaches).

    I know this for a fact because I had a field inspector yelling at me about a camera mount until I showed him that it was removable, and not a hazard to flight.

    The FAA
    We're not happy, until you're not happy.

  • Re:NGTH (Score:4, Informative)

    by WindBourne (631190) on Monday March 20, 2006 @09:11PM (#14961246) Journal
    FAA Aproval is nothing. There are various classes and certifications of instrumentations. I am a developer, so I do not really get into all that stuff, but here is the general breakdown;
    • Class A; a laptop that you carry with aviation equipment or a GPS.
    • Class B; an instrument that is IN the dashboard. But all it gets is POWER. It is not allowed to interact with anything else.
    • Class C; In the dash and ability to read the data from the aircraft bus; that is it can display the status of the aircraft.
    • Class D/E; in the dash, and not only reads, but writes data on the bus; that is it can be used for control.
    If anybody else has the real scoop, go for broke on it.
  • no USB in lynx (Score:1, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 21, 2006 @10:23AM (#14963765)
    lynxOS did not have drivers for USB the last time i worked with it

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