Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Get HideMyAss! VPN, PC Mag's Top 10 VPNs of 2016 for 55% off for a Limited Time ×

Submission + - Inventors Revolutionize Beekeeping

wombatmobile writes: For more than 5,000 years, apiarists donned protective suits and lit bundles of grass to subdue swarms of angry bees while they robbed their hives of precious, golden honey. Now two Australian inventors have made harvesting honey as easy as turning a tap — literally. Cedar Anderson and his father Stuart have just been rewarded for a decades worth of inventing and refining with a $2 million overnight success on Indiegogo. Their Flow Hive coopts bees to produce honey in plastic cells that can be drained and restored by turning a handle, leaving the bees in situ and freeing apiarists from hours of smoke filled danger time every day.

Submission + - New technique sequences ancient DNA 99.9%

wombatmobile writes: Ancient DNA has proven difficult to sequence or clone, because it is fragmentary, and most of it breaks down into single strands after it is extracted from bone.

However, a new technique developed at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, sequences single stranded DNA. Scientists just announced they used the technique to fully sequence Denisovan DNA from a bone fragment found in a cave in Siberia. They're going to go back to sequence their library of hundreds of Neanderthal DNA specimens.

How long before they make Dolly Denisovan?
Medicine

Submission + - University of Cape Town announces cure for Malaria (gizmocrazed.com)

Diggester writes: Researchers at the University of Cape Town in South Africa have developed a pill that can wipe out malaria with a single dose. It's a development that could save millions of lives in Africa alone, not to mention the rest of the world. But there's a teensy weensy little hurdle that must first be overcome: human testing.
Australia

Submission + - Bank Resists Refunding $12K To Skimming Victim (itworld.com) 1

jfruh writes: "Louay El-sayah is an Australian and a victim of a skimming attack — that is, the details of his ATM card were scanned and used to create a new card — and, over the course of six days, $12,000 was drained from his account with Commonwealth Bank via ATM withdrawls. Commonwealth was, shall we say, less than helpful in responding to the problem. They never alerted him to the series of withdrawls. They told him not to file a police report, then used the fact that he hadn't as a factor in denying his fraud claim. They told him he was a victim of skimming, then turned around claimed that it was impossible to tell from CCTV footage whether he was the one withrdrawing the money. It was only after he went public and the IDG News Service called the bank that Commonwealth agreed to refund his money."
Science

Submission + - Genome of Human Ancestor Mapped, There Might Be Other Undiscovered Ancestors Yet (medicaldaily.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers have managed to map an entire genome of a human ancestor and also suspect that there are more species that existed in the past that we have not yet found, particularly in Asia.
Researchers have managed to map an entire genome of a human ancestor. The ancestor is a member of the Denisovan group, a cousin of the Neanderthals. Researchers are hesitant to label them as a different species, choosing to call them instead a different group of humans. They also suspect that there are more species that existed in the past that we have not yet found, particularly in Asia.

Science

Submission + - Biodiesel From Sewage Sludge (acs.org) 1

MTorrice writes: "Scientists have developed a way to convert lipids from sewage sludge into biodiesel. The low cost and high yield of the sludge process may make it economically feasible as a source of biofuel, the researchers say. Today, biofuel producers use lipids in vegetable oils to derive biodiesel, a mixture of fatty-acid-like molecules. Biodiesel is compatible with existing diesel engines, burns with less pollution than petroleum-derived diesel does, and comes from renewable resources. But current biodiesel feedstocks are expensive, limiting the fuel’s widespread use. The researchers from South Korea found that sewage sludge, the semisolid material left over from wastewater treatment, can yield 2,200 times more lipids than soybeans and costs 96% less to process. To turn the sludge lipids into biodiesel, the researchers heated them with methanol."

Slashdot Top Deals

Everybody likes a kidder, but nobody lends him money. -- Arthur Miller

Working...