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Comment It goes far beyond '1 in billions' (Score 1) 951

Technology advances to the physical limitations of the universe, we are not quite there. A civilization at those limits, will have atomically precise nano-robots and real AI. They will also probably live forever. Putting those together, along with the fact that this is probably the most interesting time to live in (much before this, people usually died in the same hospital they were born, much after this, nanobots and AI will make crime, dating, disease, getting resources and other of today's hardships a non-issue) means that this particular time will probably be simulated in games and historical research an infinite number of times. They say science requires a 5 sigma for proof, the likely hood of us being in a simulation is 0.99999... with an infinite number of 9's after it.

Comment Re:@AC (#48138981) - Re:Not unexpected.... (Score 1) 97

Don't hold your breath. This guy knows he does not have an audio recording, I have googled high and low, and all you can find is the quote, which Bill Gates denies. Furthermore, MS was never in a position to dictate the memory on the system, that was decided by IBM who decided to use a 16-bit intel chip which is inherently restricted to 1024KB (640K for programs, 384K for VRAM and BIOS functions). It's merely propaganda, blaming IBM isn't Politically correct since they are now linux backers.

Comment Whoa. /keanu (Score 1) 264

I know this is off-topic, but I hadn't played this game in like a decade, and never think about it, but just last night I was sitting thinking about the times I used to play it. Didn't even know it was still around, might have to check out what their doing with it..

Comment Re:Why not stop using firefox and Java (Score 3, Insightful) 341

They really don't need to have backdoors, and that would present problems if MS and Apple allowed it. They could face lawsuits and what not, and hackers could find them and use the backdoors. Most likely what these 3 letter agencies do, is hire people to find 0-days in all the OSes and all the browsers. Modern OSes and browsers are so complicated, that this is probably easy to do. If a 0-day gets fixed, they can just always find more. It's the same effect as having a backdoor, but without the legal problems for the companies involved, and it works for all OSes/browsers. Hackers find 0-days all the time, and these 3 letter guys are probably much better and more funded, so..

Comment Re:Why not stop using firefox and Java (Score 1) 341

You don't care about games and whatever else is windows specific, but others do. Hell I don't give a spit about what you do with your PC probably. Switching to Linux is a stop-gap measure, if most tor users used Linux, they could change the malware package to work on Linux, and the same bug would have worked in exactly the same way in either case.

Comment Re:Why not stop using firefox and Java (Score 2) 341

Yea, that would make sense, except this vulnerability existed in, and was just as exploitable in Linux versions of FF as far as I know. Even if it was Windows specific, that's just coincidence since the Linux versions of firefox have vulnerabilities all the time that are just as exploitable. Do you actually know anything about computer security?

Comment Re:Why not stop using firefox and Java (Score 2) 341

"So the vulnerability is in firefox and java, but they propose to stop using Windows?" Exactly. This could have happened in any OS, they just targeted Windows because that's what most users use. Ironically IE10 run in x64 mode probably would not have this problem, since it uses vastly more address space for ASLR. It's like getting a flat tire, then the guy you hire to change your tire tells you to buy his favorite brand of car to fix it.

Comment Re:Isn't this just a frictionless surface? (Score 3, Interesting) 231

Well, the galaxy is not spinning as you think of it with stars at a constant orbit. What happens is the galaxy's gravitational field is pulling everything towards everything else in the galaxy, very slowly, so it's more like water going down a huge drain, where it circles a few times then goes poof. Same principle with our sun and planets (or your golf ball example), it appears they spin forever at constant distance, but they are slowly being sucked into the sun. So yea the galaxy collapses into the black hole, but the black hole is just a manifestation of the gravity that caused the thing to circle in the first place, and then swallowed it all up so it spins no more. Point is, galaxies are not an eternal event no matter how it plays out, and it must always die and become useless. Where as this thing in the article, possibly does works forever.

Comment Re:Isn't this just a frictionless surface? (Score 1) 231

Well, this is probably the blind leading the blind because I'm only a laymen as well, but my understanding, is that while a black hole will spin for a very long time, and you may somehow be able to extract energy from that (or not), eventually it will stop spinning and then evaporate. Talking about 10^50 years or more here, so a very long time depending on it's size, but eventually it will not be useful to any thing still around. Like I said, this device, will never stop, in theory.

Comment Re:Did it really work? (Score 1) 332

"Let me guess, you ran it in 32 bit mode, then ran it again immediately after in 64 bit mode ... and then ignored the disk cache completely?"

Nope, I did dozens of runs for each, ignoring the first result that was obvious disk I/o bound (because it was much longer). As others have explained, and I said, some code benefits greatly from x64.

Comment Re:Twice as big as it needs to be? (Score 1) 332

Depends on how you want to look at it, and who you feel like being cynical against. Easing the job of programmers is a good thing, if they can use 10x more ram and not have to write code to juggle memory as much, they have eliminated a potential source of bugs and a time sink, that is probably hard to maintain as well. Memory is cheap, I got 16GBs for $90 bucks, and though programs are larger, maybe unnecessarily so, nothing comes close to exhausting my memory. It seems like a much better method, than defining some arbitrary limit, stopping all progress, and telling programmers to 'stop being lazy sobs'.

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