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Comment Re:Has Wikileaks jumped the shark? (Score 1) 269

You already knew that the DNC liked team-player, loyal soldier Hillary rather than independent, more-interested-in-protesting-than-governing Sanders.

You need to put emphasis on 'independent'. Sanders was not a member of the Democratic Party until not long before he started running for President. Why is there any expectation that the leadership of the Party? They are there to promote the interests of the Party, which includes promoting people with demonstrated commitment to the Party.

In exchange for public funding of the parties' primary presidential elections, the general public get some say in the presidential candidate that is selected. Then again, I live in a state where the Democratic Party selects its convention delegates by caucus, where only Party members (or people who state an alignment with the Party) participate in selecting the candidate.

Comment Re: So the bureaucrats have solved all the problem (Score 1) 296

Be careful on your local rentals and read the rental agreement before you pick up your car. In the US, Sixt offers attractive rental rates, but adds a large surcharge on local renters (those without an itinerary showing they are flying in or out of the area during the rental period) if they take the car out-of-state. Several people that I know have rented from them and were unaware of the policy. I only found out when I went to the pick up my pre-paid rental and informed them that I would be driving the car in Canada (which is what you are supposed to do). The surcharge was for driving the car out-of-state, not just out-of-country. And it would only be charged if Sixt found out you drove out-of-state. One hugely annoying thing related to this is that Sixt is one of the rental car companies that Hotwire works with and Hotwire doesn't tell you which company rental is with until after you pay.

Comment Re:Retailers are holding us in the stone age (Score 1) 311

Chip and PIN works.

Pity virtually no US chip cards are chip and PIN.

This is what the US card issuers should be sued for. How is Chip-and-Sign any more secure than mag strips?

Is this yet another way that the powers-that-be discourage Americans from international travel so that they can't see that much of the rest of the world has the same freedoms that America has?

Comment Did you read the update in TFA? (Score 3, Interesting) 404

The article has been updated with:

The Clinton Foundation has denied the validity of Guccifer 2.0's claims. Speaking to Politico, a foundation representative said, "Once again, we still have no evidence Clinton Foundation systems were breached and have not been notified by law enforcement of an issue. None of these folders or files shown are from the Clinton Foundation." And, as Buzzfeed Senior Technology Reporter, Joe Bernstein, points out, it's highly unlikely that the foundation would name its own folder "Pay to Play."

If this is the case, all of you people who are still looking to stick a crime on Hillary will have to look somewhere else.

Comment Re: No? (Score 1) 375

It is not just that the Supreme Court has not had a relevant court to make a ruling on whether the programs were constitutional; the Obama Administration uses the rules of the courts to make sure that the issue never gets before the Supreme Court for a ruling. They will do things like strategically drop charges, select venues with courts more likely to determine that the other party does not have standing so it does not happen, etc.

Comment Re:Driving yes, but charging? (Score 1) 990

I've been without a gas powered car for several years now after having sold my Prius. Driving over 100 miles is not a problem. Last fall I drove from my home to Seattle, a trip a little over 800 miles. I spent two days driving it. If I were driving a gas car it would still take me two days since there's no way I can safely drive 800 miles in a day.

I have driven from Silicon Valley to Seattle (865 miles door to door says Google Maps) straight through many times with no issues. I have even driven from Deadwood, SD to Seattle (over 1100 miles, in less time than Silicon Valley to Seattle, thanks to the higher speed limits) straight through. On my last trip back from Pocatello, ID (again, over 800 miles), I took the scenic way back through the Columbia River Gorge and wasn't even tired when I got home.

I guess owning a Tesla gives you permission to presume that your driving patterns are typical.

But the thing is, doing 800 mile drives definitely falls into the 10% case, so why even bring it up?

Comment This white paper is worthless without details (Score 1) 85

If I wanted to promote a security consulting business, I could identify a niche of that market and make up a bunch of stats for that market that show a need and enough people might buy into what I wrote that I could get some consultancy business.

The IOActive white paper seems to be a security analysis based on a review of other works, not work that they did themselves. The number are estimates based on their analysis, not measurement of real world vulnerabilities.

Connected cars are likely full of security holes and they are one reason that I am avoiding buying a new car. However, I don't think that this white paper describes the actual state of the security of connected cars.

Comment Re:Duke Nukem Forever Young (Score 1) 297

How does public transportation work in areas with population density too low to fill a regularly scheduled sedan, let alone a bus?

How does public transportation work when it takes 2-3 times as long to use public transportation than to drive your own vehicle?

How does public transportation work when you need to bring large items home from the store?

How does public transportation work when you want to hiking in a national park?

There are a lot of situations where public transportation works well, but a lot of places where it doesn't work for any realistic amount of money you put into it.

There are also driving conditions that self-driving cars will not be able to figure out.

And Tesla is kinda asking for problems calling their driver assist package 'Autopilot'.

Comment Here are the problems (Score 1) 354

1. George Takei has reportedly said that he asked Simon Pegg and Justin Lin not to turn Sulu into a gay character while the film was in production. John Cho has been quoted as saying this was intended as a tribute to Takei, even though Takei asked the writer who came up with it and director not to do it.

2. Simon Pegg is saying that he knows what Gene Roddenberry intended better than Takei, despite being born after TOS was made and having never met Roddenberry.

They have changed so much in the Star Trek reboot just to change things that the change itself doesn't surprise or bother me. But they should admit that JJ Trek is their thing and they can do what they want and stop the disingenuous "we're just doing what Roddenberry would have done if he could have gotten away with it in the 60s" schtick.

And admit it is tokenism.

Comment Re:Interestingly... (Score 1) 91

The quoted "source" is a guest column advocating a particular position; it is not a traffic report. In fact, it misrepresents what was behind the reduction in trips in the Seattle DOT traffic report. The author attributes the reduction to increases in use of alternate forms of transportation, but completely ignores an even bigger for reason for the reduction in the number of trips, the Great Recession, which hit in the middle of the reporting period.

Since 2010, the number of trips has been increasing.

Here is the actual 2015 Seattle DOT traffic report. Here is the 2015 Washington state DOT traffic report. Check the numbers for yourself.

Just based on what I have observed, traffic has increased significantly since 2014, but the data does for 2015 does not seem to be available yet to confirm this.

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