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Comment Re:Driving yes, but charging? (Score 1) 990

I've been without a gas powered car for several years now after having sold my Prius. Driving over 100 miles is not a problem. Last fall I drove from my home to Seattle, a trip a little over 800 miles. I spent two days driving it. If I were driving a gas car it would still take me two days since there's no way I can safely drive 800 miles in a day.

I have driven from Silicon Valley to Seattle (865 miles door to door says Google Maps) straight through many times with no issues. I have even driven from Deadwood, SD to Seattle (over 1100 miles, in less time than Silicon Valley to Seattle, thanks to the higher speed limits) straight through. On my last trip back from Pocatello, ID (again, over 800 miles), I took the scenic way back through the Columbia River Gorge and wasn't even tired when I got home.

I guess owning a Tesla gives you permission to presume that your driving patterns are typical.

But the thing is, doing 800 mile drives definitely falls into the 10% case, so why even bring it up?

Comment This white paper is worthless without details (Score 1) 85

If I wanted to promote a security consulting business, I could identify a niche of that market and make up a bunch of stats for that market that show a need and enough people might buy into what I wrote that I could get some consultancy business.

The IOActive white paper seems to be a security analysis based on a review of other works, not work that they did themselves. The number are estimates based on their analysis, not measurement of real world vulnerabilities.

Connected cars are likely full of security holes and they are one reason that I am avoiding buying a new car. However, I don't think that this white paper describes the actual state of the security of connected cars.

Comment Re:Duke Nukem Forever Young (Score 1) 297

How does public transportation work in areas with population density too low to fill a regularly scheduled sedan, let alone a bus?

How does public transportation work when it takes 2-3 times as long to use public transportation than to drive your own vehicle?

How does public transportation work when you need to bring large items home from the store?

How does public transportation work when you want to hiking in a national park?

There are a lot of situations where public transportation works well, but a lot of places where it doesn't work for any realistic amount of money you put into it.

There are also driving conditions that self-driving cars will not be able to figure out.

And Tesla is kinda asking for problems calling their driver assist package 'Autopilot'.

Comment Here are the problems (Score 1) 354

1. George Takei has reportedly said that he asked Simon Pegg and Justin Lin not to turn Sulu into a gay character while the film was in production. John Cho has been quoted as saying this was intended as a tribute to Takei, even though Takei asked the writer who came up with it and director not to do it.

2. Simon Pegg is saying that he knows what Gene Roddenberry intended better than Takei, despite being born after TOS was made and having never met Roddenberry.

They have changed so much in the Star Trek reboot just to change things that the change itself doesn't surprise or bother me. But they should admit that JJ Trek is their thing and they can do what they want and stop the disingenuous "we're just doing what Roddenberry would have done if he could have gotten away with it in the 60s" schtick.

And admit it is tokenism.

Comment Re:Interestingly... (Score 1) 91

The quoted "source" is a guest column advocating a particular position; it is not a traffic report. In fact, it misrepresents what was behind the reduction in trips in the Seattle DOT traffic report. The author attributes the reduction to increases in use of alternate forms of transportation, but completely ignores an even bigger for reason for the reduction in the number of trips, the Great Recession, which hit in the middle of the reporting period.

Since 2010, the number of trips has been increasing.

Here is the actual 2015 Seattle DOT traffic report. Here is the 2015 Washington state DOT traffic report. Check the numbers for yourself.

Just based on what I have observed, traffic has increased significantly since 2014, but the data does for 2015 does not seem to be available yet to confirm this.

Comment Re:Injustice Served (Score 5, Informative) 254

A lot of this story is correct, but a lot of it isn't.

In case you couldn't figure it out, Desilu was Desi Arnaz and Lucille Ball's production company, which they ran together. Arnaz handled the business side and Ball handled the creative side. After Ball divorced Arnaz and then remarried, Arnaz couldn't handle working with her anymore. Ball bought him out, but didn't really want to run a company. However, the studio wasn't doing so well at the time and she didn't want the staff to loose their jobs. So, she used 'I Love Lucy' spin-off pilot advance money to pay for shows like 'Star Trek' and 'Mission: Impossible'. Once the studio was doing well enough to be sold for a reasonable price and the staff would keep their jobs, she sold Desilu.

NBC originally aired 'Star Trek', not CBS. NBC were not inclined to cancel 'Star Trek', because it did well in particular demographics popular with advertisers. Roddenberry started the cancelation rumor and seeded the letter writing campaign. NBC had nothing to do with Gulf + Western's purchase of Desilu; Gulf Western owned Paramount Studios and renamed Desilu as Paramount Television.

Years later, Viacom bought Paramount. Years after that, Viacom bought CBS. A few years after that, Viacom split into a TV company (now called CBS) and a movie company (now called Paramount). The TV company owns 'Star Trek' and JJ Trek is the movie company licensing Trek from the TV company. And CBS is the current instantiation of the company formerly known as Desilu.

Comment Think they haven't been trying to solve this? (Score 3, Informative) 343

After AF447 and then again after MH370, the people who deal with stuff for a living have been discussing this. Well, not this kinda lame proposal, but the problem that it is trying to solve.

Here is a GAO report on the topic.

As far as the "fossil fuel" wasted on the search, a) as noted elsewhere, you want to search for survivors (JAL123, a 747, crashed into the side of a mountain and there were 4 survivors) and b) even if you know exactly where the plane went down, the fuel used to search is small compared to the fuel spent on recovery.

Comment Re: Since 1984 (Score 1) 214

As other have noted, DEC was doing just fine in 1979. They didn't start to have problems until a decade later and never went bankrupt (they were eaten by Compaq who was eaten by HP).

Never wed to one tech supplier because they all die? Well, they don't all die. IBM is still around. Or, they continue on in companies that ate them. Burroughs and Sperry-UNIVAC hardware live on in Unisys ClearPath Libra and Dorado systems.

Comment Re:Test mode (Score 1) 100

And yet, here I am with a 4 cylinder Jeep that gets around 30 miles per gallon, and has enough ponies to keep up with traffic better than many old school V8's. And it's clean. Which by the way, is a lot better gas milage and power than a similar engine from before that time. Somehow the deadly predictions didn't come true.

then again, what are ya gonna do - there are still people pissed off about them removing lead from gasoline.

Your 4 cylinder Jeep that gets 30 mpg, puts out 156 bhp and 141 lb-ft. The only old school V8s with that little power and torque were the ones choked by early emissions control devices.

The problem with lead going away was that it was needed for the valves on older engines. Eventually hardened valve seats would eliminate the need but who had to pay for all of those engine rebuilds to install them.

Oh, what's the EPA fuel economy numbers for a 1985 Honda CRX HF? Almost 60 mpg highway. Twice what your Jeep that you are so proud of is rated at.

Comment Re:Yeah, so? (Score 1) 306

In other words, an officer had a reasonable suspicion that something illegal happened that required a search, and convinced a judge of such, which is the entirety of Fourth Amendment protection. The police don't have to convince the public that a search is reasonable. They only have to convince a judge. The judge (and his views on privacy and other issues) is elected in a general election.

And it it is perfectly reasonable for six detectives to act on a warrant and conduct a search at 6:15am. That isn't harassment at all.

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