Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Get HideMyAss! VPN, PC Mag's Top 10 VPNs of 2016 for 55% off for a Limited Time ×

Comment Other motivations (Score 4, Insightful) 164

With smaller players dropping out of the game, soon it might become a "single player" game after all. If this scenario happens, then a single entity controlling 51% of the keychain nodes can potentially disrupt the entire BitCoin economy by effectively "rewriting history".

I'm not sure this is a good thing. Every advancement seemed to have moved the needle to this direction. While everyone was able to run CPU miners is was very democratic. Then GPUs came, but still people could drop in a few hundred, and continue. After FGPA, and the ASICs, it's not just very large firms, where smaller people can only "rent" nodes, and hope they can trust the infrastructure.

We might need a "reset", where ASIC is no longer viable, but I'm not sure that would still be possible.

Comment Be the enabler (Score 1) 112

Do not try to "manage" them, but try to help them achieve their goals. Be the enabler, ask them what they need to complete their tasks, and make it a priority everyone is able to function at their peak.

This of course setting up shared calendars, VC software/hardware, DVCS, and so on on the techinical side. People should be able to see what they are supposed to do, reach their peers for information, and gather together to talk about updates, and have ideas (on the VC).

On the personal side, try spending some time with each member every week. Communicate what is expected of them, and let them tell you their worries.

As long as you have competent developers, they should be able to handle the job. If you do you job well, they will not even realize you're there.

Comment Re:Wow, they really are stuck in the past (Score 4, Insightful) 486

Nope, this has come before, and raising inflation does nothing to the richest top %0.1. In fact, it will make them richer.

It is a long discussion, but go read "Capital in the 21st Century". For a short idea, think about the ways they "park" their assets. Do you think prices of real estate will not appreciate with inflation?

Inflation is mostly harmful for the middle class which cannot invest in efficient assets, but has enough money to lose value.

Comment Many wrongs in this one (Score 1) 208

Let's not let this pass since we all love Testa. Even though Tesla is not the party directly responsible for these contracted workers, they should have better practices to vet the companies they work with.

There is a path to legally bringing workers from your overseas offices, It is an L1 Visa, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... , B visas specifically are not allowed to work, but can come here to apply for jobs (which then require moving to a proper work permit), or build their own company (very easy to get permission for if you can show you'll invest a sizable amount of money here). Anyways, if you really want, getting workers legally is easy, especially skilled ones.

Comment Physical will be around for a while. (Score 1) 244

Physical disc still has advantages, especially when you want to dedicate two hours to a "blockbuster" movie. (I would say my time is more important, but I'm posting here, so that cannot be too serious). There is still visual and sound quality differences, and if you're not in a hurry, they go on sale often, $10, and $7 movies (during black friday season) are common.

And ripping becomes important as well. More so for TV shows. (For movies, having the disc play though ads, warnings, etc sometimes "bearable", since I would be microwaving popcorn during that time). My TV has Plex (which is based on XBMC), and I prefer the experience to whatever the BluRay gives me. (I can access my collection through any device, resume where I left, etc).

Anyways, this is a letdown, but I'm sure someone else will pick up.

Comment Re:Already here (Score 1) 412

Unfortunately inflation is not the solution, as long as the wealthy can "park" their money in investments that bring more than the inflation. And I'm talking about "passive" investments here, not the entrepreneurial ones, which actually benefit the society (i.e.: starting a new company, digging a hole for resources, etc).

They will always find a way to get better returns than inflation. Just buying lots of real estate, for example.

There are better solutions, the "Capital in the 21st Century" for example discusses one. It is not income tax, or inflation, but wealth tax (i.e.: levy) that will actually redistribute the wealth, at least according to the author. There might be other solutions, or this particular one might not be workable, however inflation is known not to decrease the wealth of the richest people, only the lower middle class.

Comment Way older than most people think (Score 1) 166

These kind of backdoors have been around for a very long time. Remember "AWARD_SW", or "AMIBIOS"? Those passwords have opened so many BIOSes back in the day. It was helpful, until everybody started circulating lists. The manufacturers changed default passwords, but took a while for them to give up on those passwords entirely.

They help "lazy" operators and sysadmins, but they also help hackers as well.

Comment Re: *May* owe $8 billion (Score 1) 148

In the top-100 of that list, I could recognize "Nokia" as a only known tech company. The majority of large European companies seem to be in the Energy, Utilities, or similar government sanctioned monopolies, or older industry like Automotive. They have much higher revenues compared to tech companies, and I would assume their average age is around 100 years old.

Comment Re: Blame Chrome (Score 1) 165

SSD's have a very good secure erase mode, but it is very low level. I had to do it once, when I forgot the password on my Samsung portable SSD. Basically the drive sends a concurrent pulse to all cells, and then drains them (that's what I understood). It took a very short time, and since it happens to the entire drive, and the initial data was encrypted anyways, I don't think any data woul dbe recoverable after that point.

But this is not an advertised feature, and I had to speak with the customer service to get the right tools.

Comment Re:ANOTHER one? (Score 1) 109

Yes. They seem to spent honest amount of effort on their idea, and still have not given up. This is not like some scoundrel who just take the money, and leave without a trace. There was real development, albeit it fell short. And judging by the project scope, it is reasonable to conclude that one million is not nearly enough to run a robotics team for several years.

Comment Probably laziness at work (Score 1) 129

Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity. The firmware developers probably never finished the "5" case in the "level" switch, and were still fine to ship the laptop with Windows. They were not obligated to do anything else to bring this to the market in any practical way.

I've seen developers write the minimum amount of code that will "make it just work", and ignore what will make it "actually right". This is not only Linux's issue. Even Windows had to do crazy things, like Win 95 had to use Win 3.1 memory manager if Sim City was running (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/APIWar.html). That is software, not hardware, but the core concept is the same. Somebody does a crappy product that works with a certain OS, and all the others have to mimic that in order to get that product working.

Comment What would possibly happen (Score 2) 611

What would possibly happen is that they will charge you $250 (+20 for various fees), and then still find a way to incorporate ads in the future. Remember how cable subscription you already pay for includes ads in the programming? In fact it already started, even large news outlets are including "adveterials" (sponsored stories), which are even worse than ads (it takes a second to realize they are not in fact real editorial content).

Comment Re:Silly argument (Score 2) 529

Exactly. They are different skills, and in fact most of the people laid off are foreigners (i.e.: Nokia).

Even though I am not a huge Microsoft fan, I do have a friend there, who was actually laid off with this wave. He was a US citizen, but he will not be replaced with an H1B worker, since the entire project was cancelled.In fact this seems to be his only regret, because not only they gave him a good severance package, he is skillful, and I believe he'll have no difficulty finding another job (even at Microsoft is he wanted to).

Comment Misconceptions (Score 1) 903

Contrary to common belief, Insurance is *not* healthcare. It's a way of distributing risk. For example, your car insurance will not cover oil changes, or regular maintenance. H*ck, even extended warranties will not cover those. This is because the cost structure is very well known (so and so much every 6 months).

Thus -- ignoring what these churches ask -- the only reason for including contraception would be reducing future risk. I.e.: the cost of these pills are well known, and the insurance would normally prefer not to cover them, as they do not cover aspirin, or baby diapers. However by including cheap contraception pill they mitigate a more costly future risk (a "cheap" delivery will cost 10K+ these days, and God forbid if there is anything wrong probably in the 100ks). So for insurance it makes sense to include these pills (still no aspirin).

However the church -- or whatever organization that does not want to provide these, just needs to have a separate pool of insurants, so that the cost of delivering a baby is only distributed among them. (I'm assuming they would also like to have more babies in general, but this might not necessarily be true for all religions).

Slashdot Top Deals

"In order to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -- Carl Sagan, Cosmos

Working...