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Submission + - What is employers obsession with programming languages? 1

An anonymous reader writes: Just got off the phone with a recruiter for a company and the lady asked if I had 3-4 years C++ and 3-4 years Java experience. Okay, so first off, C++ and Java are two different programming languages used for two completely different purposes.

C++ being used mainly for low-level platform specific programming and Java being platform independent. My response was I programmed in C++ throughout college, but haven't worked any jobs specifically writing C++ and I've had Java experience in past jobs, but mostly used C# which was similar.

She said, "Oh well we are only looking for those two languages so thanks anyways". Is it just me or is this absolutely insane? It's like wanting to hire a mechanic who has 3-4 years experience working with just 1978 ford trucks. I mean really? How did we get to this point as engineers?

As any developer worth their weight in salt can attest, the languages are so similar it's kind of difficult to distinguish between them looking at syntax alone and if you've got a computer science background or equiv what's it really matter if the underlying OOP concepts are the same.

Is this just a result of incompetent managers and ignorant recruiters or as engineers have we set ourselves up by succumbing to a label such as Java Engineer or C# Programmer.

Should I just say yes, and move forward with the interview? I mean, I could probably answer most C++/Java programming questions unless they are truly looking for people who spend all their time memorizing specific libraries or API's which in my opinion is insane. I equate that to trying to memorize a phone book. You can but why would you want to?

Not only is it frustrating as a job candidate, but it seems to really be limiting your hiring pool to a small few who by chance happen to work in a couple different programming languages over the course of their career. How do most of you handle this sort of thing?

Submission + - Dark matter detection to go ultra sensitive with LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) (topexaminer.com)

hypnosec writes: The US Department of Energy has given a green light to the world’s most sensitive dark matter detector ever built — LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ). The dark matter detector, has received an approval for the scope, cost and schedule. LZ is named for the merger of two dark matter detection experiments: the Large Underground Xenon experiment (LUX) and the UK-based ZonEd Proportional scintillation in Liquid Noble gases experiment (ZEPLIN). LUX, a smaller liquid xenon-based underground experiment at SURF will be dismantled to make way for the new project.

Submission + - World's First Baby Born From New Procedure Using DNA of Three People (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The world’s first baby to be born from a new procedure that combines the DNA of three people appears to be healthy, according to doctors in the U.S. who oversaw the treatment. The baby was born on 6 April after his Jordanian parents travelled to Mexico where they were cared for by US fertility specialists. Doctors led by John Zhang, from the New Hope Fertility Center in New York, decided to attempt the controversial procedure of mitochondrial transfer in the hope that it would give the couple a healthy child. Speaking to the New Scientist, Zhang said he went to Mexico where “there are no rules” and insisted that doing so was right. “To save lives is the ethical thing to do,” he said. The boy’s mother carries genes for the fatal Leigh syndrome, which harms the developing nervous system. The faults affect the DNA in mitochondria, the tiny battery-like structures that provide cells with energy, and are passed down from mother to child. Ten years after the couple married, the wife became pregnant but she lost the baby in the first of four miscarriages. The couple had a baby girl in 2005 who died at the age of six, and later, a second child who lived for only eight months. Tests on the wife showed that while she was healthy, about one-quarter of her mitochondria carried the genes for Leigh syndrome. When the couple approached Zhang for help, he decided to try the mitochondrial transfer procedure. He took the nucleus from one of the woman’s eggs and inserted it into a healthy donor’s egg that had had its own nucleus removed. He then fertilized the egg with the husband’s sperm. The US team created five embryos but only one developed normally. This was implanted into the mother and the baby was born nine months later. The baby is not the first child to be born with DNA from three people. In the 1990s, fertility doctors tried to boost the quality of women’s eggs by injecting cytoplasm, the cellular material that contains mitochondria, from healthy donor eggs. The procedure led to several babies being born with DNA from the parents plus the healthy donor. Some of the children developed genetic disorders and the procedure was banned.

Submission + - When is a bug too old to be fixed? (treats.wdt.io)

An anonymous reader writes: That’s the question after the discovery of a nearly 30 year old bug in cron. At what point would a fix break things for too many people accustomed to the existing behaviour? A must-read for anyone working with cron schedules.

Submission + - Scientists Use Quantum Teleportation to Send Encrypted Messages (discovermagazine.com)

Flash Modin writes: Two teams of scientists have taken quantum teleportation from the lab into the real world. Researchers in Calgary, Canada, and Hefei, China, used existing fiber optics networks to transmit small units of information across cities via quantum entanglement — Einstein’s “spooky action at a distance.”

A few experiments in the lab had previously managed to send information using quantum entanglement. But translating their efforts to the real world, where any number of factors could confound the process is a much more difficult challenge. That’s exactly what these two teams of researchers have done. Their breakthrough, published in two separate papers today in Nature Photonics, promises to offer important advancements for communications and encryption technologies.

This isn’t teleportation in the “Star Trek” sense — the photons aren’t disappearing from one place and appearing in another. Instead, it’s the information that’s being teleported through quantum entanglement.

Submission + - What Happens When Judges Pull the Plug on Rural America (backchannel.com)

mirandakatz writes: After the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in favor of restrictive state laws that prevent municipalities from setting up their own networks, Pinetops, North Carolina had its internet cut off. And that's just the tip of the iceberg: as Susan Crawford points out at Backchannel, the court decision is likely to spur the introduction of even more restrictive laws, making it increasingly difficult to ensure that we move the entire country over to fiber-plus-advanced-wireless, not leaving pockets of rural America without 21st century connectivity. For too long, local heroes have been fighting this fight—but Crawford argues that this needs to be a focus of the next president of the United States.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: What "rights" did Microsoft claim today? (microsoft.com)

shanen writes: What does the new MS Services Agreement and Privacy Statement REALLY mean?

Feels like ancient history, but do you remember "Where do you want to go today?" According to Wikipedia that was their second global campaign, so on the one hand, the beast knows we want freedom, but on the other hand is the EULA and "Services Agreement and Privacy Statement" and fiendish friends.

I am not a lawyer, so I have no idea what it means. I'm sure the old one wasn't perfect, but nothing is. I'm strongly suspicious the new one is more strongly in Microsoft's favor, but that's just speculation.

Googling for analysis comes up dry, but this is an obvious case of professional courtesy. There probably are some insightful websites out there, but if the google helps us find the Microsoft ones, then Microsoft will put more effort into making sure Bing returns the corresponding results about the google, eh?

Insights? Suggestions? Where are the (significant) changes and what do they really mean? How doth Microsoft profit? And of course...

Where do I want to get screwed today?

Submission + - Sugar Industry Bought Off Scientists, Skewed Dietary Guidelines For Decades (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Back in the 1960s, a sugar industry executive wrote fat checks to a group of Harvard researchers so that they’d downplay the links between sugar and heart disease in a prominent medical journal — and the researchers did it, according to historical documents reported Monday in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. One of those Harvard researchers went on to become the head of nutrition at the United States Department of Agriculture, where he set the stage for the federal government’s current dietary guidelines. All in all, the corrupted researchers and skewed scientific literature successfully helped draw attention away from the health risks of sweets and shift the blame to solely to fats—for nearly five decades. The low-fat, high-sugar diets that health experts subsequently encouraged are now seen as a main driver of the current obesity epidemic. The bitter revelations come from archived documents from the Sugar Research Foundation (now the Sugar Association), dug up by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco. Their dive into the old, sour affair highlights both the perils of trusting industry-sponsored research to inform policy and the importance of requiring scientists to disclose conflicts of interest—something that didn’t become the norm until years later. Perhaps most strikingly, it spotlights the concerning power of the sugar industry. In a statement also issued today, the Sugar Association acknowledged that it “should have exercised greater transparency in all of its research activities.” However, the trade-group went on to question the UCSF researchers’ motives in digging up the issue and reframing the past events to “conveniently align with the currently trending anti-sugar narrative.” The association also chastised the journal for publishing the historical analysis, which it implied was insignificant and sensationalist. “Most concerning is the growing use of headline-baiting articles to trump quality scientific research—we’re disappointed to see a journal of JAMA’s stature being drawn into this trend,” the association wrote. But scientists disagree with that take. In an accompanying editorial, nutrition professor Marion Nestle of New York University argued that “this 50-year-old incident may seem like ancient history, but it is quite relevant, not least because it answers some questions germane to our current era.”

Submission + - Tesla reveals slew of Autopilot improvements in upcoming 8.0 firmware (tesla.com)

haruchai writes: Less than 2 months after parting ways with optical driver assistance systems maker Mobileye, Elon Musk and Tesla have revealed the soon-to-be released feature upgrades for Autopilot — and it's all about radar, baby!!

Musk claims a dramatic reduction in false braking events, stating that most drivers may never experience another for the lifetime of the car and that v8.0 will give access to 6 times as many radar objects with far more detail and no new hardware required.
More at Electrek — https://electrek.co/2016/09/11...

Submission + - China To Resurrect The AN-225 (popsci.com)

schwit1 writes: On August 30, members of the Aviation Industry Corporation of China (AICC) and the Antonov Corporation, the leading Ukrainian aviation company, signed an agreement to restart production of the AN-225, the world's largest cargo aircraft.

The 640 ton, six engine An-225 is the world's largest aircraft. Measuring at 84 meters in length and a wingspan of over 88 meters, it carries a world record payload of 250 tons (to put this into comparison, it can carry around 300,000 lbs more than the US military's Boeing made C-17). The sole operational An-225 began flying in 1988, initially carrying the Soviet Buran, a 105 ton reusable spaceplane, on its back. It was put into storage after the Soviet collapse, but restored and put into commercial service in 2002. Since then it has been rented out, flying super heavy cargos like gas and wind turbines, as well as military supplies for NATO forces in the Middle East.

Submission + - Secret Court Orders force companies to provide backdoor to spy on you (internetsafetyandprivacy.com)

internetsos writes: Electronic Frontier Foundation has lodged a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Justice under the Freedom of Information act to confirm if there are secret orders forcing the creation of back doors to spy on us.

Freedom of Information (FOIA) lawsuit has been filed by The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) against the U.S. Department of Justice to obtain information on secret court orders requiring technology companies to decrypt their customers’ communications.
The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is a digital rights group that wants to know if the government obtained orders from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) to force companies like Apple and Google to assist in surveillance efforts. The EFF want the DoJ to declassify this and other significant FISC opinions as part of the surveillance reforms enacted by Congress with the Freedom Act.

FBI want to be able to look at your phone

The FBI recently tried to make Apple build a backdoor to the iPhone to allow the agency to bypass the security on the phone belonging to the man alleged to be behind the San Bernardino terrorist attack. The FBI retracted the demand when a third-party helped it hack the phone but they are still trying to get apple to provide a back door and way to decrypt data stored on devices.

The EFF are demanding to know if the government has attempted to obtain similar orders from the FISC, which the EFF says operates mostly in secret and approves a majority of surveillance requests. They referred to news reports stating that the government has sought FISC orders to force companies to hand over source code, which would allow them to find and exploit software vulnerabilities for surveillance purposes.

“If the government is obtaining FISC orders to force a company to build backdoors or decrypt their users’ communications, the public has a right to know about those secret demands to compromise people’s phones and computers,” said EFF Senior Staff Attorney Nate Cardozo. “The government should not be able to conscript private companies into weakening the security of these devices, particularly via secret court orders.”

Proposed law to force companies to decypt user data

Senators Richard Burr and Dianne Feinstein of the Senate Intelligence Committee proposed a law that would force companies to decrypt user data when presented with a court order. The senators said the proposed law was a discussion draft that would be formally introduced only after they get feedback from the public and key stakeholders.

Submission + - Dissecting a frame of DOOM

An anonymous reader writes: An article takes us through the process of rendering one frame of DOOM (2016). The game released earlier this year uses the Vulkan API to push graphics quality and performance at new levels.
The article shades light on rendering techniques, mega-textures, reflection computation... all the aspects of a modern game engine.

Submission + - Top notebook doesn't support Linux in 2016?? Lenovo did it! (lenovo.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Most latest models from Lenovo can't run Linux (nor any other OS from the pre-installed one), because some obscured firmware design. Is this 1998? No! This is just today, we several Yoga models.
And what is the answer? There's non!

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