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Comment Re:Roundup backpack=bad ? (Score 5, Interesting) 130

The problem is that neonicotinoids are about as close to an ideal insecticide as we could hope to have. They're effective on a broad spectrum of insects, they don't harm plants, and they're really quite safe around mammals. For example, dinotefuran has an oral and dermal LD50 in rats of > 2000mg/kg, is not known to be carcinogenic, and is not known to be a neurotoxin. It's also essentially non-toxic to birds, fish, and aquatic invertebrates (important because of chemical run-off.) I'm not saying I'd sprinkle it on my breakfast cereal, but I wouldn't get sick from it.

They just happen to be 50 times as lethal to bees as to any other insect. So even the lowest doses used to control economically damaging pests are still going to kill huge numbers of bees, because the tainted nectar and pollen that comes back with the bees feeds the colonies.

I really like the stuff for INDOOR control of greenhouse pests. Outdoors, I won't use it.

Comment Re:Cloud-connected means disposable (Score 1) 101

It's not their "fault" because they were under no contractual obligation to provide support. Why should they continue to make their expensive resources available for free, when they're not making them any money? Especially when they're running out of money and a sugar daddy like Fitbit shows up with a wad of cash.

This is textbook capitalism. Nobody sells you stuff in order to make you happy; they sell stuff in order to make money. Never, ever forget that.

Comment Re:Fitbit must die (Score 1) 101

Sorry, I'm calling 100% bullshit on this one.

The fitbit app has never asked for access to my contacts, and it would only request access if I asked it to "Add Friends" and explicitly tapped on the "Contacts" button. All the "friends" I've added have been done so without granting access to the whole contact list, I've simply typed in their email addresses. And it's never sought access to my "call history", or whatever other evil conspiracies you imagined it might have done when you typed etc., etc.

Now go be a good son. Give the fitbit back to your dad, apologize for being overly paranoid, show him how it works, and help him keep up his health.

Comment Re:so what? (Score 2) 101

The real issues I see are that fitness trackers [...] don't provide workout plans to meet the needs of the individual [...]

Everything else you said is spot on, but you missed on this one. If you're interested and motivated, the Fitbit app offers a few generic workout videos and plans, but they offer a "Fitstar Personal Trainer" app, which does provide personalized workout plans. Open the Fitbit app on your phone and tap the "Guidance" compass icon to get started. Once upon a time, many years ago, they would link you up with an actual human trainer, but I don't know what they offer now.

Comment Cloud-connected means disposable (Score 4, Insightful) 101

It's not Fitbit's fault; it's the entire business model of the Cloud. Sell some cool tech thing that's cloud-dependent, run low on cash because those servers aren't paying for themselves, get bought by a bigger company. Fitbit just knows how to play the game, for now.

Who's really to blame when you buy a cloud-dependent toy, with no service contract to guarantee cloud availability for the next 25 years? What other outcome were you possibly expecting to happen? The only rational question is, "how long will I get to play with my cool toy until the company pulls the servers down?" And you should factor that limited lifespan estimate into your purchase price.

Comment Re:Unless it costs more (Score 1) 130

The current processes work pretty well. My dentist can get me in the chair, pop in a tooth-colored filling, and get me out in less than 20 minutes, at which time I'm free to eat whatever I want, and it costs only a few hundred dollars. If I have to have a temporary tooth cap, wait ??? weeks for the regrowth to take place, make another appointment to get the cap taken off, pay the patent-inflated price for the magical tooth-growing sponge, and then pray I don't get tooth or bone cancer, I think I'd rather stick with the old fillings.

Comment Re:Better options these days (Score 1) 90

I hope they don't change it too much, I'm happy with the way it is. I have this little Minecraft world I play locally on my computer, I've had it for years. If I get stressed at work I can just go into this world and do a little more building and exploring. There's always something that needs to be done and it is satisfying and stress free (except for the occasional creeper blowing stuff up.) I'm not a fan of the mods, if it got much more complicated it would become stressful. It's my little escape I plan to retire to someday, maybe pass on to my kids.

Comment Re:Fixing this is too expensive (Score 5, Informative) 75

The problem is too expensive to fix, but not for the reason you mentioned.

Many passengers struggle with flying, due to inexperience, carelessness, distractions, or fear of flying, or they lack the mental capacity to understand everything they need to do. These people need the simplest possible way to access their flight info. That means helping them as much as possible by printing the booking code on the luggage tags, flight coupons, boarding passes, everything.

So far, it's much cheaper to accept the risk of a few people messing with the flight info, rather than dealing with millions of scared, confused, and/or angry travelers stuck in an unplanned layover because they didn't have the ability to access their connecting flight information.

That could change if someone figures out how to monetize this hack safely, but that's very unlikely. The booking code isn't the only security measure in place. The hackers can change a flight, but a passenger complaining at a gate will win out over an online change; anyone attempting to cash in on the fraudulently changed ticket risks felony theft and fraud charges.

Comment Re:What a coincidence. (Score 4, Informative) 67

What? You think the Chinese fucking CARE?

This is from a 2013 Time article (emphasis added):

In a 2007 survey, the IFAW [International Fund for Animal Welfare] discovered that 70% of Chinese polled did not know that ivory came from dead elephants. This led to the organization's first ad campaign- a simple poster explaining the actual origins of ivory. A campaign evaluation earlier this year found that the ad, promoted by the world's largest outdoor advertising company JC Decaux, had been seen by 75% by China's urban population, and heavily impacted their view on ivory. Among people classified as "high risk"- that is, those likeliest to buy ivory- the proportion who would actually do so after seeing the ad was almost slashed by half.

Comment huh (Score 1) 1

my son thought a lot of it was boring too. I thought it was the 2nd best of the sw films after esb.

Comment Re:I'be been a Mac user for 13+ years (Score 1) 254

Given the description of the test includes repeatedly downloading the same pages on an "internal" hosted server, they're at least attempting to control for variables like automatic updates, random network scans as a result of malware attacks, or variations in advertisements delivered. An "external" test risks exposing the machine to too many random power draining events.

Or do you mean "external" as in an external simulated mouse and keyboard instead of an "internal" script? CR has always been scrupulously careful in their testing methodology. Since it would be almost impossible to fairly compare a shell script with a batch file, it seems highly unlikely they would trust a test script.

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