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Comment Re:An utterly pointless filter. (Score 1) 319

I suspect it's not primarily celebrities that want their age removed. Their age will be known anyway.
This is for nobodies and maybe C-list celebs that will no longer pass the first filter. "Damn, more than 200 applicants. Throw out anyone over 40!". When this happens it does not matter how much plastic surgery you have had to look younger.

I guess this is a bit like applying for tech jobs in some places. It does not matter that you have all the qualifications. Too old and your out before the process even started.

Also, hiring adults to play teens is a very specific case which has the advantage of avoiding child labor laws.

Comment Seems to be a lot of information missing (Score 1) 72

They say 450.000 people are driving for Uber, but the interesting number should be the number of customers riding with Uber.
Further more, I think we really need to know how many are riding around midnight, or other times when people are most likely to be driving drunk.
If all Uber drivers are working when almost nobody was driving drunk anyway it's very unlikely they affect the statistics very much.

It may also be that many people riding with Uber are people who used to be the designated driver, now thinking Uber is better than staying sober all night.
If this is the case we might have just as many drunk drivers now as before, because people who were assholes that just don't give a fuck before Uber came along are still assholes that don't give a fuck.

Comment Re:Old stuff "discovered" by the ignorant (Score 1) 519

Isn't your second point the exact same thing we assume for the ideal free market? Rational actors with perfect information.
"It assumes perfect information on the part of the rational actor. While this is an oft-used simplification in economic models, it's a lousy reflection of reality. It's simply impossible for a rational actor to gather and correlate sufficient information to make it work."

Comment Re:Can't opt out of Facebook? Please... (Score 1) 202

I believe the specific means of communication is not important here, it's the act of not using what everyone else in the group are using.
If most of his friends are using Facebook to organize events, he is the oddball that is hard to contact because he only uses e-mail.

This is equivalent to you stop using e-mail, or answering phone calls and insisting that you can be contacted only by fax.
Sure, your friends can probably send you a fax if they really want to, and your 2-3 closest friends may even do so, but you better believe most of your extended group of friends won't bother with that, and you're gonna miss out on a lot of invitations.

It's most likely exactly like that for him. Some people still keep in touch and go out of their way to invite him to events. Everybody else won't bother.

This means, that for a large segment of the population, opting out of Facebook is a huge sacrifice socially.
When the options are "use facebook" or "miss out on almost everything", for many people there is only one realistic option.

Comment IMDB has the same problem as all online polls (Score 2) 858

It appears IMDB has the same problem all online, voluntary polls have. You do not get the opinion of the population at large, you only get the opinion of people who like to answer polls.
For IMDB this means their scores represent the score of people who like to rate movies.
From the article this appears to be men to a greater extent than women. There are most likely other biases as well. Maybe tech savvy people are more likely to do online ratings, and the scores are biased towards show that techies like?

You don't have to be a SJW to find this an interesting problem.
It's the same problem as can be seen in voting polls for presidential election, and all other election where people are trying to predict the result. You are trying to predict the general result based on the answers from people willing to answer the polls.

A second problem specific to movie ratings is that I may not be interested in the general opinion. For recommendations I want opinions that correlate with my own opinions. If you happen to like Sex And The City, you don't care that all the nerds vote Firefly to the top. You want shows that align with your interests.

But lets start with figuring out the real score for the general population...

Comment Depends on the available alternatives (Score 1) 766

It's possible that they weigh the moral right thing against the financial right thing.
If it is easy to find an alternative to NC, why not do that?
At the same time it could be really hard to find an equally good alternative to Singapore. Are the laws better in other countries in that area? And if there are countries with better laws in this regard, they may be worse in other ways.

Comment Missing option: Fix mobile, but nothing responsive (Score 1) 166

The mobile version kind of sucks because it does not have all the features from the full site, so please make a better mobile version.
However, "Responsive" usually turns out to be "Responding very slowly", so I'm not too keen on that.

I usually let Opera Mini reflow /. main site to one column when I'm on mobile. This sucks for reading comments, but it sucks less than all other options.

Another thing with mobile websites is that it may be difficult to detect when mobile layout is best.
10" tablet: Full site
5.5" phablet: mobile version.
Somewhere in between the switch needs to be made, but it's very likely that different users have different opinions on when.

So, please make a better mobile version, but make it easy for the user to switch between the two versions.

Comment Re:Polls like these (Score 5, Insightful) 403

Polls really belong in the sidebar so you remember to check back in after a few days when people have voted.
But if polls mixed in with articles drives traffic to the poll, I would not mind having a post in the regular flow that highlights that there is a new poll in the sidebar. Maybe that will make people see it faster and the voting will "settle" quicker.

Comment Re:Missed the Boat? (Score 1) 271

It was really volatile until people figured out what it was but it's no worse or better than any other currency. Try owning any random currency during government unrest. It's "collapsed" to all of ~$350. Which is still worth more than your Zimbabwe dollars.

Why the hell would you own a "random currency during government unrest"?
That seems like very low bar to compare yourself with.

According to coindesk the BTC value during the last 12 months has varied from approximately $210 to $450, or somewhere around 100% "volatility".
Compare to Euros, 1.05-1.15
China CNY, 0.15-0.16
Japan JPY, 0.0080-0.0086
UK GBP, 1.41-1.58
They are all in the region of 10%

That makes the BTC look like it is still pretty damn volatile.

Comment Re:a classic economics problem (Score 1) 554

You don't necessarily even have to charge money for the electricity.
According to TFA part of the problem is people leaving the car plugged in after it has finished charging.
So put a price on time spent plugged in but not charging. That would ensure people do not waste any time plugged in, while still providing the incentive of free fuel for the cars.

Comment Re:He might be right on the point of law here... (Score 1) 305

It replaced a business unit with a contractor (perfectly legal), and that contractor happened to use H1B Visa holders (also perfectly legal).

H1B is meant for when you can't find the competency locally. Clearly that is not the case here, since the contractor could hire the old employees.

Comment Related Dilbert (Score 1) 583

HR departments have learned that most people will accept whatever low-ball initial offer is made, and companies take advantage of that fact. Of those that do negotiate, most of them do a poor job of it, using the lowball offer as the starting point for negotiating.

Anchor price Apparently it works in salary negotiations too.

Comment The biggest positive effect of no ads (Score 1) 611

The biggest positive effect of no ads would be that sites could stop with the click-baiting.

Today lots of sites write misleading sensationalist headlines or leave out important details in summaries just to maximize the click-through and the number of shown ads.
Imagine if all those writers spent their time on writing text that benefits the reader instead of the advertiser.

For that I would gladly pay $230.

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