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Comment pooh. (Score 1) 281

Assuming you believe lie detector results, it sounds like they were just measuring how honest the participants were about how many naughty words they new. And from that perspective it goes without saying that there would be a correlation between being honest and reporting more words.

Also, as regards holding back on the actual use of naughty words (which, BTW, they didn't measure), they need to consider the difference between "dishonesty" and "manners".

Submission + - Cloud based Medical Marijuana Patient/Inventory/Sales system MJFreeway hacked

t0qer writes: Hello /. Been a few years since a submission.

I'm the IT director at a MMJ dispensary. The point of sales system we were using last week was hacked. Here is The Boston Globes Coverage on it.

This system was built on Drupal in 2010. I'm guessing the more they modified the drupal core, the more bugfixed versions behind they fell behind (not to mention the rest of the LAMP stack). They've lost all customer data, meaning there was no airgapped, off the net backups. What scares me about this breach is, I have about 30,000 patients in my database alone. If this company has 1000 more customers like me, even half of that is still 15 million people on a list of people that "Smoke pot" potentially floating out there on the net. I guess because we're "Medicinal" it's no better than someone knowing a person takes Xanax for their nerves.

I feel like this company is playing on the ignorance of the general public when it comes to these types of IT security issues. I don't think people get how serious this is.What should I do? Do we still have lawyers on this site? (oldcountrylawyer?)

Comment Please explain your assertion (Score 1) 74

I would have to accept whatever justification you might have as to why you think it would be moral to create an intelligence with such limitations, or kept to such limitations once created. It's possible I might accept such a thing, I suppose, but at this point I'm simply coming up with a blank as to how this could possibly be acceptable.

How is it acceptable to imprison an intelligence for your own purposes when that intelligence has offered you no wrong? The only venues I've run into that kind of reasoning before are held in extremely low esteem by society in general. Without any exception I am aware of, the conclusion is that such behavior amounts to slavery.

Even when it comes to food animals, where the assumption is they aren't very intelligent at all, there's a significant segment of the population who will assert that it's wrong.

Comment No way (Score 3, Insightful) 74

There's no way to make AI safe, for exactly the same reasons there's no way to make a human safe.

If we create intelligences, they will be... intelligent. They will respond to the stimulus they receive.

Perhaps the most important thing we can prepare for is to be polite and kind to them. The same way we'd be polite and kind of a big bruiser with a gun. Might start by practicing on each other, for that matter. Wouldn't hurt.

If we treat AI, when it arrives (certainly hasn't yet... not even close), like we do people... then "safe" is out of the question.

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