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Comment Re:I'm not surprised. (Score 1) 917

"IP" is a bogus, meaningless term. What do you actually mean? Copyright? There are fair use exceptions to copyright in the USA, and fair dealing allowed uses in other parts. Note that in the USA, reproducing copyrighted material for the purpose of "criticism" may be considered fair use.

Comment Re:I'm not surprised. (Score 1) 917

Asking subordinates for sex is wrong. That there was no explicit threat made against her if she rejected does not make it acceptable.

If you think otherwise, well most of the rest of society disagrees with you in many parts of the western world: a manager who does the above _must_ be disciplined (in some meaningful way), or else the company has opened itself up to legal liabilities. A company that ignores multiple such complaints against a manager is going to find itself paying out a lot money when it loses the inevitable employment law court case.

Comment Re:I'm not surprised. (Score 1) 917

A manager propositioning subordinates is essentially always wrong.

Even in some unlikely situation where the subordinate had unambiguously and clearly been signalling sexual interest in the manager, over a sustained period of time, the manager would be _very_ ill-advised to enter into non-professional relations while the employee was a subordinate or the employee's career could in any way be perceived to be influenceable by the manager. The manager should just not go there, full stop.

In this specific case, she'd been there one day, so we can rule out that highly unlikely scenario, and conclude that if such a proposition was made it was clear misconduct.

Mature, large companies (least, that I'm familiar with) have fairly strict rules banning relations between managers and subordinates for very good reason. Precisely because such relations are very likely to be unhealthy and improper: For the manager, for the subordinate, for other subordinates of the manager, and for the company.

Comment Re:Wrong. (Score 1) 482

I did work for Google and have since retired. So point not invalid.

As someone who has interviewed nearly 200 people to do work like mine, I'm very much aware how rare my skills are. And I'm also aware how many CVs and phone screens happened before I saw those people. So no, not confirmation bias.

I'm also aware that it's not a huge amount of work to acquire those skills. Particularly now with loads of free resources one can use to learn more. Invest a little money and you could have your own rpi kubernetes cluster for a few hundred bucks. You can run hadoop or spark or hbase or mesos on a cloud provider. Learn ansible, prometheus, go, python or loads of other things in your browser. You can show off your skills outside your job on github or bitbucket and contribute to loads of projects to build up a real, viewable CV.

There are companies out there that value their engineering staff. For starters, they're usually not calling them "IT staff." You should look for those companies. You should also look at the job you do. Is it worth what they pay you? If you ran the company, would you keep that position? If either answer is no, go find a company where both those answers are yes - and your career will be the better for it.

Comment Get better skills (Score 1) 482

I've been hearing about H1-B visa issues on slashdot since I joined and my uid is 5000. And quite honestly, I've never understood it. If you keep up your skills and progress beyond basic tech support or other low-level paper-pushing jobs this is never an issue.

In my experience, people with H1-B visas fill one of two scenarios: needs and costs.

The first is where a company needs more staff because they are always hiring. This would be like a Google or Facebook where they need smart, capable staff and can't find enough of them. Even with H1-Bs they can't. So there's no threat to "native" workers.

The second is to replace low-skilled staff with cheaper workers. And yeah, I get that sucks. But the solution is to learn more skills so you can get the first type of job.

I'm a 45 year old developer. I've learned more programming languages post-college than I learned in college. I've taken courses on managing development teams. I've read tons of books on various aspects of tech. I have skills that are useful and hard to find.

That's the answer - and it's actually part of the point Hillary Clinton was making.

Comment Re:Why do Insurance companies make it so hard then (Score 1) 99

For some sustained period of your life, your calorifie intake exceeded your energy expenditure and you put on weight. You may have reduced your calorie intake since then and stabilised your weight gain, however you have not reduced your calorie intake and/or increased your energy expenditure sufficiently to /reduce/ your weight.

At core, it is that simple.

There are details that matter though. E.g., different foods are digested and metabolised in different ways, and can produce different hormonal and neurological responses. E.g., sugar is processed quickly, alters insulin levels quickly, and your brain tends to crave it - so it doesn't fill you up. Higher fibre, less processed, and lower glycaemic index foods tend to be better for weight control. They make you feel full for longer, take more energy to digest, and your body responds more slowly. E.g., fresh fruit is great in that respect. Indeed, even *fats* aren't a bad thing per se - probably better to get your energy from fats than sugary things. Particularly, unprocessed (esp, never significantly heated) plant fats and oils from nuts, legumes, avocados, etc., seem to be good for us.

Also, not all exercise is equal either. You see people in gyms doing weights trying to lose weight - completely wrong. Sustained, aerobic exercise using the biggest muscles in your body: your legs and your stomach muscles (for breathing - not sit-ups). Doesn't have to be super-hard either, you actually burn more fat at *lower* intensity aerobic exercise. At higher intensities of aerobic exercise (i.e. the kind you can only sustain for ten or twenty minutes), your body uses sugars as they're easier to convert to energy. If you reduce the intensity a bit, down to a level you could sustain for an hour+, you should get to a zone where your body can meet the energy demands by burning fat stores - and your body usually will prefer to burn fat stores when it can (carbohydrate stores being more limited and precious).

The biggest issue is finding time for exercise. I hate the gym myself. To get exercise, I need to build it into my life so it's simply unavoidable. For me, that means relying on a bicycle to get to/from work. Cycling has worked for others. E.g., see: https://theamazing39stonecycli... - he lost 170 kilogrammes (~376 lbs) in a couple of years, by cycling.

If you review your life, make changes to how and what you eat, and exercise, it is possible to get to a healthy weight. Not easy, but you can make it happen.

Comment Re:Why do Insurance companies make it so hard then (Score 1) 99

There was an excellent programme in the UK called "Secret eaters". They would have obese people - often a set from same household - who couldn't understand why they weren't losing weight, despite eating all healthy, compile a food diary. These food diaries would nearly always show the person was eating well, and should be losing weight.

The good bit was they'd then put the person under surveillance, with cameras in the house and (unbeknownst to the people) detectives following them around. Then they would compile a list of what the people were _actually_ eating. Pretty much universally, the obese people in their programmes were self-delusional about their eating. E.g., they'd tell themselves "But I only eat a salad for lunch" while ignoring all the sugary and/or fatty snacks they were eating at their desk or on breaks before other, and/or ignoring various calorie-rich sauces or other sides they were having with the salad - that type of thing.

So, I don't believe you.

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