Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment World isn't ready for a open source Siri (Score 0) 115

Do you not realize that Siri must utilize a significant backend resource at the other end of a data connection to be effective, and that the backend requires substantial resources to operate and maintain? Siri is not some standalone app you download and forget. An open source equivalent would not be free, and would require a Kickstart and guaranteed subscriptions to be feasible. I don't think the world is quite ready for such a thing yet, not in a country populated by people willing to vote for either Trump or Clinton.

Comment Re:Not sure you have a lot of options? (Score 1) 177

If you do a fresh install of Windows 7 these days? The update process is PAINFUL! You'll literally need to leave the PC downloading updates for a good 8-10 hours or more before it finally starts doing anything obvious

On the most recent one I did updating was completely broken. For days. Even printer drivers were unavailable. It turned that that turning updates off - rebooting - then turning them on again allowed that 8-10 hours or more.
The way it behaves changes frequently.

Comment A bit of an update (Score 1) 194

France USED breeders and then shut them down apart from a tiny research reactor.
A bit of background: In 1968 it looked as if high grade Uranium ore was going to run out since a long list of countries even including Egypt were planning to build reactors. The price of Uranium rose as a consequence.
The French response to that was to plan some fast breeders, build them, run them for decades and then shut them down. They have not built new ones because high grade Uranium ore is no longer a rarity and the demand is not high (there is about a centuries worth in a single mine in Australia and quite a lot in other places).

Various green groups claimed credit for the old reactors shutting down but the reality is something designed in 1968 and built very shortly after was just too worn out in so many components that it was not worth running any longer - especially since the French weapons program no longer needed the material and the competing reactor designs are much cheaper to use.

Comment Re:Mature technology like solar and wind... (Score 1) 194

Germany has some of the highest electricity rates

Australian consumers pay more despite nearly all of the generating capacity being coal fired plants running at a very cheap price per MW/h. You'll need more than that assertion to show that "solar and wind can't survive", since we're discussing a group of poorly regulated local monopolies often being used as hidden taxation by governments. You are also mixing up peak and base load generation sources, where it often doesn't matter if they cost a bit more (if you need 10MW then expensive solar is going to be cheaper to bring online than 500MW of cheap coal - cheaper per MW doesn't matter so much when it only comes in very large chunks).

Taking an oversimplistic approach as you did above really gets you nowhere. It's much more productive to find out about the topic before preaching about it than the other way around.

Comment Re:Black swan events (Score 1) 194

If there were some way to build thousands of small-scale nuclear plants instead of 100 large ones,

They would be entirely pointless.
Thermal power scales dramatically. Double the number of solar panels and you get double the power, scale up a thermal plant the same way and you get more than double the power.
The greater the volume of steam the greater the percentage of energy you can get out of it - low pressure but a lot of it (after you've got everything out that a smaller plant could do) means you can turn a turbine that would not spin up with less.
You can have a lot of little reactors instead of one big one but the important thing is to have as much steam as you can get spinning those turbines to overcome friction and all the rest.
If a small nuke is doing something other than powering a ship for long range purposes or similar then it's an expensive toy. To get a return the things have to be big.

Comment Re:So many people who think they are experts... (Score 1) 194

On the very simple aspects it's very easy to get a handle on things.
For fine detail it matters if you are an expert or have listened to one on exactly that fine detail.


Due to people coming from different field or not having a generalised enough education there are a lot of topics where everyone who has picked up enough to attempt high school physics can get a handle on something but those that never got that far can not - hence a lot of pointless discussion here over very simple things and anger from the latter about "self appointed experts".


The most depressing one of those I've hit here is the 9/11 "truthers" who refuse to believe that hot steel gets soft. Am I an expert on that topic? Yes I fucking am and proved it with thousands of tons of steel rod with the right heat treatment before most people posting here were born - but you don't need to be an expert to know the simple thing that hot steel gets soft.

Comment Isn't it funny (Score 1) 194

Isn't it funny how hopeless nuclear fanboys kept insisting that the government was against nuclear power the entire time despite things like this going on?
You can blame government, hippies or whoever but the reality is that US nuclear companies just do not have their shit together which is why when the UK went shopping for nukes they went to the Chinese. Say whatever you like about the Chinese nuclear industry but they do not have the current mode of failure of Westinghouse etc of spending far more on public relations than they have on research and development.

Comment Re:It's the cost of the labor, stupid (Score 1) 140

I really dislike the savings as an income tax deduction. Not only is the savings deferred for up to a year, but the only way you'll ever receive it is by meticulously documenting everything. This savings is tacked-onto the process, in other words, instead of being an integral part of it. I don't believe that can succeed long term.

Comment Re:It's the cost of the labor, stupid (Score 1) 140

I really dislike the savings as an income tax deduction. Not only is the savings deferred for up to a year, but the only way you'll ever receive it is by meticulously documenting everything. This savings is tacked-onto the process, in other words, instead of being an integral part of it. I don't believe that can succeed long term.

Slashdot Top Deals

The confusion of a staff member is measured by the length of his memos. -- New York Times, Jan. 20, 1981

Working...