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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 21 declined, 9 accepted (30 total, 30.00% accepted)

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Music

Submission + - 300bps N, 8, 1 - The Hidden Track

puppetman writes: I came across a story about a hidden track found in a band's album.

But the hidden track wasn't a song, it was a text file, encoded as a track. And this wasn't an mp3 or compact disk — it was on vinyl, on an album that came out 1992.

The tracks name was, "300bps N, 8, 1 (Terminal Mode or Ascii Download)", and to those in the know, it was instructions on configuring your modem to receive the file.
Canada

Submission + - Peter Adekeye Freed, Judge Outraged at Cisco's (arstechnica.com)

puppetman writes: Ars Technica has an article relating the recent release of Peter Adekeye, a former Cisco employee who was arrested in Canada on trumped-up charges that appear to have been fabricated by Cisco. Slashdot covered the story back in April, 2011, during which time Mr Adekeye was still being detained.
In the ruling, the judge squashed the US extradition request, rebuked both the Canadian and American authorities for "an appalling abuse of process", and goes as far as to say that the criminal proceeding was launched on behalf of Cisco, to mirror the civil proceedings that Mr Adekeye had launched against the powerful Cisco. The full judgement, which is quite readable and damning, can be found here.

Power

Submission + - Nanosolar Begins Production, Auctions off Panel

puppetman writes: "Nanosolar announced today that they are shipping their first commercial solar panels for freefield deployment in Eastern Germany.

Nanosolar was mentioned in a Slashdot story last month when they received a "Best of 2007" award from Popular Science for their printed thin-film solar cell that cost $.99 per watt.

In addition, they kept the first three commercial grade panels that came off the printer — the the first for their office, another for the Tech Museum in San Jose, but the third is up for auction on EBay."
Google

Submission + - Google's Sinister Plans (Maybe)

puppetman writes: This week, Robert X. Cringely makes some interesting observations as to what Google's up to next. He theorizes that Google is looking to create a bandwidth shortage that will drive ISP/cable/telephone customers into it's open arms (often with the blessing of the ISP/cable/telephone company). The evidence: leasing massive amounts of network capacity, and huge data centers in rural areas (close to power-generation facilities). The shortage will only occur if the average bandwidth consumption by individual consumers skyrockets; think mainstream BitTorrent, streaming moves from NetFlix, tv episodes from iTunes, video games on demand, etc, etc. Spooky and sinister, or sublime and smart?
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft's Fastest Patch Ever

puppetman writes: Wired columist Bruce Schneier wrote an article today called "Quickest Patch Ever", about a patch that was issued within three days to fix a vulnerability in Windows Digital Rights Management (DRM) that potentially compromised Microsoft's relationship with record labels. Other patches — to fix security holes that compromise computers that run Windows (and potentially all the data on them) — those get dumped out once a month.

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