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Comment This happened to me last summer. (Score 2) 124

I woke up to five "We auto-reloaded your card" e-mails from Starbucks overnight. They hit me for $500. They used my Starbucks card (linked to my debit card, set to auto-renew by adding $100 when the balance was low) to purchase email gift card codes in multiples of $25. Canceled my Starbucks card, canceled my debit card, filed a police report. The investigator determined that the codes were sent to a generic e-mail account in Canada, and that was the end of it. The bank was good and put the money back right away. They also changed my debit card number. Starbucks sent me a new card but they never quite fixed the "reload online" part (not auto-reload, which I disabled), so I can only reload in a store, which I'm OK with. Had I known it was going to be that easy for them to hack me, I would have never used auto-reload or had it save my credit card.

Comment Re:It is never "too late" (Score 1) 451

Thanks for your comment. For the right career I'm more than willing to dive in. I don't mind spending nights and weekends getting caught up or learning new things. I'm pretty low on the pay scale now anyway, so I'm not too concerned about pay at this time. I'm willing to work my way up, in fact that's kind of what I'd like to do. But I'll never win a ballroom dancing championship. :-)

Comment Re:Why would it be "too late"? (Score 2) 451

Thank you for your detailed and insightful comment. I really appreciate the time you took to type out such a lengthy answer. I'm definitely not attached to learning about e-mail; I was just using that as an example of one of the things that interests me. I can let that go pretty easily. As far as not being able to train as much as I would expect--I currently deal with that exact situation now. The majority of my job consists of developing and delivering training to teachers on various technology items. Scheduling is always a problem, especially across teams, departments, or grade levels. It just makes it all the more fun when I actually make it happen. I learned about "food bribery" long ago, and typically try to make it fun by providing stuff like that at my trainings. $20 on coffee and donuts is a huge morale booster and starts my sessions off in a great way. I do pride myself on my communication skills and enjoy teaching folks how to use the software and websites we use. I tend to absorb these things pretty easily, and can intuitively find my way through most of our stuff, with or without training beforehand. One of the reasons I'm asking around now is that I don't plan on seriously looking for something until I finish my master's degree later this year. This gives me a little bit of time to perhaps learn some skills and chart a rough course of what I'd like to do. Learning something that quickly becomes outdated is a situation I'd like to avoid--so I appreciate you sharing the "buzzwords" heads-up with me. Thanks again.

Comment Re:Definitely not too old (Score 1) 451

I have not applied for private sector jobs yet. Right now I'm trying to plan the best way forward (this was part of the process for me, so thank you for sharing). I'm also wrapping up my master's degree this year and would like to complete that before I start looking to make a change. That said, I will have time over the summer to invest in bettering myself and look forward to taking on some of this community's recommendations.

Comment Re:Those who can do, those who can't teach. (Score 1) 451

Thanks for writing. I only see each group of 12-year-olds for 23 days, which is why we don't do coding. Although I am the school's technology coordinator, the class I teach is not computer science. I did do a two-day ultra-basic HTML thing with them last quarter. We do have a separate careers class that addresses many of the job-finding questions (and naturally, college stuff).

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The trouble with computers is that they do what you tell them, not what you want. -- D. Cohen