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Comment Re: Founders / Hamiltonians (Score 1) 88

By founders you must be forgetting about the Hamiltonians who definitely did want all that stuff and is why instead of not giving the government power, the Constitution contains so many provisions against using the power the government was given because the Hamiltonians knew they could go back on all the exclusions they were granted.

Submission + - AI Program Can Predict Human Rights Trials With 79 Percent Accuracy (theverge.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Computer scientists have created an AI program capable of predicting the outcome of human rights trials. The program was trained on data from nearly 600 cases brought before the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR), and was able to predict the court's final judgement with 79 percent accuracy. Its creators say it could be useful in identifying common patterns in court cases, but stress that they do not believe AI will be able to replace human judgement. As described in a study published in the journal PeerJ Computer Science, the AI program worked by analyzing descriptions of court cases submitted to the ECHR. These descriptions included summaries of legal arguments, a brief case history, and an outline of the relevant legislation. The cases were grouped into three main violations of human rights law, including the prohibition on torture and degrading treatment; the right to a fair trial; and the right to "respect for private and family life." (Used in a wide range of cases including illegal searches and surveillance.) The AI program then looked for patterns in this data, correlating the courts' final judgements with, for example, the type of evidence submitted, and the exact part of the European Convention on Human Rights the case was alleged to violate. Aletras says a number of patterns emerged. For example, cases concerning detention conditions (eg access to food, legal support, etc.) were more likely to end in a positive judgement that an individual's human rights had been violated; while cases involving sentencing issues (i.e., how long someone had been imprisoned) were more likely to end in acquittal. The researchers also found that the judgements of the court were more dependent on the facts of the case itself (that is to say, its history and its particulars) than the legal arguments (i.e., how exactly the Convention on Human Rights had or had not been violated).

Submission + - Google thinks its Assistant will be the biggest thing since search (backchannel.com)

mirandakatz writes: Google's rollout of its Assistant bot marks a turning point for the company: if enough users engage with the Assistant, it'll get smarter, and before long, it'll be able to make huge leaps in understanding, applying information from a wide range of sources to get a single task completed. But none of that will happen if people get fed up with the Assistant's initial shortcomings and stop using it altogether. "The Transition," as Google calls it, is waiting to happen—but first people have to start saying "OK Google," and then keep talking.

Submission + - Strange signals from star survey may be evidence of intelligent life (iop.org)

Okian Warrior writes: A recent paper reporting on strange artifacts in the spectra of 234 stars is raising eyebrows in the Astronomical community.

A Fourier transform analysis of 2.5 million spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey was carried out to detect periodic spectral modulations. Signals having the same period were found in only 234 stars overwhelmingly in the F2 to K1 spectral range. The signals cannot be caused by instrumental or data analysis effects because [various reasons...]

Finally, we consider the possibility, predicted in a previous published paper, that the signals are caused by light pulses generated by ETI to makes us aware of their existence. We find that the detected signals have exactly the shape of an ETI signal predicted in the previous publication and are therefore in agreement with this hypothesis. The fact that they are only found in a very small fraction of stars within a narrow spectral range centered near the spectral type of the Sun is also in agreement with the ETI hypothesis. However, at this stage, this hypothesis needs to be confirmed with further work.

Comment Re:8% (Score 4, Insightful) 104

it's kind of amazing how they managed to do that and not have anyone tell them that their ideas were stupid

I have no doubt that plenty of people have told them exactly that. It would not surprise me to learn that they fired anyone who did so, though.

If Twitter were an engineering-driven company, they wouldn't be lousy with SJWs.


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"The eleventh commandment was `Thou Shalt Compute' or `Thou Shalt Not Compute' -- I forget which." -- Epigrams in Programming, ACM SIGPLAN Sept. 1982