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Comment Re: But of course (Score 2) 445

I agree that it isn't the governments job but, in many ways they have made it so. Since they have made it so, they have done it incompetently. You still have zoning and the areas near the river can simply be zoned for farmland. Yes, there is personal responsibility and while I feel bad when people lose their stuff due to a flood, I can only think that if I were moving into a flood zone I'd check to see how high the water has gotten in the past. Then I'd make sure I had a two level house and kept my valuables upstairs or built my house on a dirt hill that I constructed. Of course in Hawaii where I used to live, one house I lived in was up on stilts with the carport underneath. Smart. Even so, it still isn't smart for the Army Corps of Engineers to wall the Mississippi in so it has nowhere to expand to when the rains come. Btw: The Mississippi Delta is losing (as I recall) one football field worth of land daily due to erosion and settling caused by the mismanagement of the Mississippi.

Comment Re:But of course (Score 5, Insightful) 445

Absolutely correct. What people forget is that the Mississippi used to have flood plains all along its path. When there was heavy rain anywhere along its course, the waters would raise and it would overflow its banks depositing rich soil and silt all along the way. Now, we've replaced the flood plains with housing developments and mini-malls. The rich soil deposited by the Mississippi is under asphalt. (Well, not all of it.) Additionally walls, dams, and other barriers have been constructed by various municipalities and the US Army Corps of Engineers to keep the Mississippi from overflowing its banks. This creates a situation where additional water has no where to go other than to cause the water level to raise and for the river to run faster (such as water flowing through a pipe.) When it gets down to coastal LA, it is traveling much faster than it would naturally and is causing massive erosion. Additionally, it causes major floods as the pent up water finally has a place to go. Government planning at it's best. (Thanks US Army Corps of Engineers!)

Comment Re:But What About the Other 10% ???? (Score 1) 990

I have a sneaking suspicion that the "freemarket" already has a solution. People want the freedom to do what they want, when they want, and how they want. People own the cars they want now.

Uber isn't going to have Uber Trucks in small rural towns. They especially aren't going to have it if you live on a ranch far from a small rural town. Uber Trucks won't be happy if you dump a bunch of bricks in the back. I for one am not entirely excited about the idea of having to find a special vehicle every time my driving needs fit outside the norm or having to have accounts with 15 different companies to handle each situation.

Uber drivers and electric cars aren't going to take me on that dirt road for 60 miles at 4:00am so that I can capture that moment on (digital) film when the sun first pokes its head over the mountains at the far end of the canyons.

I'm not particularly excited about the self driving van hauling my kids. If I crash with my kids in the car, it is possible that it is entirely my fault. If it is a self driving vehicle and it gets into an accident because it slammed on the brakes because some sage brush blows across the road and it can't tell the difference between that and a feral hog, that is an entirely different deal. I'm not going to put my kid's lives at the hands of a programmer (speaking as one).

That's the problem with quite of few people in this world. Their solutions only work if you are exactly like them.

Comment But What About the Other 10% ???? (Score 1) 990

I'm not interested in a car that gets me to 90% of the destinations I need to go to. Odds are those 90% are able to be handled in lots of ways (including borrowing the neighbors car). I'm interested in the other 10%. Do they have an electric vehicle that can carry lumber and sheets of plywood from the hardware store? Do they have electric vehicles that I can take on a remote and rough dirt road so I can watch the sunrise from a vista? Do they have an electric vehicle that I can put the kids in along with all their friends? The answer is NO. The solution is simply to not replace the standard vehicle but to add an inexpensive and highly efficient vehicle such as the Elio that can be used for 90% of the tasks. Then I can use the truck / off road vehicle / minivan for the other 10%.

Comment Re: Umm, Curry (Score 1) 72

This brings up all sorts of questions... Indian or Thai curry? Massaman or Masala? Chicken or Beef? How spicy? Does coconut kurma count as a curry? Does this show a bias towards the Brits who will only be part of the EU for a short time? What about Chinese Or Japanese curry? Will they be fairly represented? Inquiring minds want to know....

Comment Re:Seems reasonable. Coming soon to USPS I hope? (Score 1) 183

Personally, I would be quite happy with Snail Mail delivery every other day. The US Population could be devided up into two groups. One gets their mail every M, W, F and the other would get their mail T, Th, Sat. Given that, you only need 1/2 the mail carriers. Priority mail would still get delivered as normal. Thus if it has to be there on a certain day then it will be if it was sent via Priority Mail. However, for bills, coupons, promotional offers and the occasional birthday/Christmas/Easter card, an extra days wait is no big deal.

Comment Re: The new McCarthyism (Score 1) 114

It isn't anything like the Iranian system. Virtually anybody can run for President with only a few restrictions. The parties can nominate who they want and the parties can fund who they want. Third party candidates do pop up Ross Perot being a good example and even potentially Trump if he gets all pissy if he doesn't get the nomination. (Better for him to go lick his wounds and play the martyr however.).

Comment Re:we're all scientists (Score 5, Insightful) 634

A scientist is someone who seeks to find the truth via the scientific process. Bill Nye is not this. He is an actor. He has the potential to be a scientist as we all do and he has some degrees that could allow him to have a leg up in being a scientist compared to some others. Even so, he has chosen to be an actor and an activist. At this stage, he is at most a science enthusiast. Once he starts a serious research project about something we don't already know the answer to and develops his various hypotheses and then proceeds to develop and run a methodology to test them, then I'll call him a scientist.

Comment Just to be clear .... (Score 2) 629

The summary says: "Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in his sleep while on a hunting trip near Marfa, Texas." I'm not one for conspiracy theories but, a more accurate description (as reported by the owner of the ranch) would be: "Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in his sleep with a pillow over his head while on a hunting trip near Marfa, Texas."

I'm sure that he regularly slept with a pillow over his head and it was all simply a misunderstanding. This can happen -- just like the guy who slept with a horse head on his bed in The Godfather.

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