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Comment Re: A well known psychological bias (Score 1) 126

Yeah, the theory of cognitive dissonance is where people rationalize their choice in order to avoid buyer's remorse. This isn't my field, buy it may be that the phenomenon is stronger when more expensive or more socially valuable or more powerful items are chosen. There was an upheaval in the theory in 2007 when researchers used monkeys choosing m&m's, and a mathematician saw that and said the experiment was invalid because they feel victim to the Monty Hall Problem. I think later experiments avoiding Monty Hall got new, valid evidence for the theory.

Comment Maine Implied Warranty (Score 5, Informative) 210

Sounds like a violation of the Maine implied warranty law. I don't know what the state can do to Apple, but there is an Apple store in the state's largest mall.

The Maine Implied Warranty is the little known law that protects Maine consumers from being sold seriously defective items. It can be an Unfair Trade Practice to refuse to honor the Maine Implied Warranty Law within four years of sale. The basic test for possible implied warranty violations is as follows: The item is seriously defective, The consumer did not damage the item, The item is still within its useful life and is not simply worn out.

No class action needed.

Comment Maine Implied Warranty (Score 1) 204

Sounds like a violation of the Maine implied warranty law. I don't know what the state can do to Apple, but there is an Apple store in the state's largest mall.

The Maine Implied Warranty is the little known law that protects Maine consumers from being sold seriously defective items. It can be an Unfair Trade Practice to refuse to honor the Maine Implied Warranty Law within four years of sale. The basic test for possible implied warranty violations is as follows: The item is seriously defective, The consumer did not damage the item, The item is still within its useful life and is not simply worn out.

Comment Edit The Map (Score 5, Informative) 767

The article made no mention on whether the homeowner checked the Waze Map Editor to make sure his and the surrounding roads were marked correctly. For example, a road marked as a Primary Street type will be favored by the algorithms over a road marked as a Street type.
If the information is wrong, then fix it yourself, and change the routes of thousands of people. This is the correct way to combat inappropriate Waze routes: Make sure Waze's map data match the quality and capacity of the carefully laid out roadways. If the roadway capacities are not laid out well, then your problem is not Waze.

Comment Re: Classic theme (Score 4, Funny) 235

Most people in my area referred to the XP default theme as the "Fisher-Price Theme." In Windows 8, when there is a CD in your drive, the associated message says something like "Tap here to eject CD." It said "tap," even when you didn't have a touch screen. That is when I knew Windows 8 was designed for touch screens first.

Comment Re:Article is wrong on two things (Score 1) 114

Ugh, sorry about formatting. Here, I think this is right:

"A virtual CPU is whatever Amazon wants to offer in an instance series."

No. The vCPU (Virtual CPU) aspect of an AWS EC2 Instance is the county of virtual cores that are exposed to an OS. In desktop computers, a quad core Intel CPU will appear to have four courses when looked at from inside the OS (my go-to way to count them in Linux is to run top and press 1). A quad core hyperthreaded Intel CPU will appear to have 8 cores. The vCPU metric simply tells you what the OS will show you, and tells you how many processor threads can run concurrently.

"If you deal with server sizing and instance price comparison, then the measure -- previously expressed as an EC2 Compute Unit or ECU -- is kaput." ... "It's the closest thing you'll find to an acknowledgement that ECUs are still in use behind the scenes, but Amazon no longer wishes to define them due to the changing nature of its underlying hardware."

Yes, ECU (Elastic Compute Unit) metrics are still used behind the scenes, but Amazon does publish them. Even for new Instances. Check out these URL's:
http://a0.awsstatic.com/pricin...
http://a0.awsstatic.com/pricin...
Of course, this isn't very parsable by human eyes. So someone started an open source project to display this data, and its available at http://www.ec2instances.info/

So yeah, TFA is wrong.

Comment Article is wrong on two things (Score 1) 114

> "A virtual CPU is whatever Amazon wants to offer in an instance series." No. The vCPU (Virtual CPU) aspect of an AWS EC2 Instance is the county of virtual cores that are exposed to an OS. In desktop computers, a quad core Intel CPU will appear to have four courses when looked at from inside the OS (my go-to way to count them in Linux is to run top and press 1). A quad core hyperthreaded Intel CPU will appear to have 8 cores. The vCPU metric simply tells you what the OS will show you, and tells you how many processor threads can run concurrently. > "If you deal with server sizing and instance price comparison, then the measure -- previously expressed as an EC2 Compute Unit or ECU -- is kaput." ... "It's the closest thing you'll find to an acknowledgement that ECUs are still in use behind the scenes, but Amazon no longer wishes to define them due to the changing nature of its underlying hardware." Yes, ECU (Elastic Compute Unit) metrics are still used behind the scenes, but Amazon does publish them. Even for new Instances. Check out these URL's: http://a0.awsstatic.com/pricin... http://a0.awsstatic.com/pricin... Of course, this isn't very parsable by human eyes. So someone started an open source project to display this data, and its available at http://www.ec2instances.info/ So yeah, TFA is wrong.

Comment Re:Short answer: No (the correct answer) (Score 1) 133

"An agreement is yet to be signed." is in the OP's link and that gives us an idea that in the future there MAY be an agreement.

That article is from June 23, 2011. A final agreement called the Momorandum of Understanding (PDF) was written on July 6, 2011. It's an agreement between MPAA, RIAA, AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, Cablevision, and Time Warner Cable. I don't know if it was actually signed on the lines, and I haven't heard of anyone leaving or entering the agreement.

Comment Re:Is it just Yahoo? (Score 1) 152

Possibly. To add to your anecdote, a couple months ago my old Yahoo! account got cracked, and I figured it was because I had left a weak password on there (fairly susceptible to a dictionary attack with some variance). So I changed to a stronger password and enabled two factor authentication. Then last week my coworker also got cracked, and she reported that she had a weak password.

Maybe someone got a copy of a Yahoo! hashed password and user name table that they can work against with a computer cluster, or maybe Yahoo! is allowing tons of fast authentication attempts against single user names on their servers.

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