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Comment Re:Ever the optimist is our Elon (Score 0) 426

90% of the work we're doing now (and probably closer to 100% of slashdotters' work) doesn't *need* to be done, but we do it anyway.

That's because the alternative is to just give them the things they need to live, which bothers a lot of people who like to take the position that the only moral way to survive is to work.

It has nothing to do with Maslow. If people's time wasn't taken up with bullshit jobs, and they instead were able to do work they found personally fulfilling without having to worry about working to survive, then their esteem and self-actualisation would be taken care of.

Comment Re:So? (Score 1) 167

I have Raynaud syndrome and cannot even take food out of the freezer without gloves - my fingers, even ones I didn't touch anything with, turn ghostly white, then purple, then start hurting. Outside in the winter, even a brief exposure without gloves results in chilblain (mild frostbite) ulcers that take weeks to heal. Diltiazem helps a little, but I have still gotten chilblains while on it.

In my case, an iPhone or any touchscreen at all is out of the question in the winter. I have an old-fashioned cell phone with buttons that allow me to answer the phone with thinner gloves I have on under heavy mittens, but forget fingerless gloves.

Comment Re:Not sure (Score 1) 107

Most of my tech friends have gmail accounts, many of them from the days when they were hard to get and almost considered a status symbol. But why is Google's data mining preferable to AOL's or any other? I know that AOL has long been derided as being associated with grandmothers and "free" AOL disks, but their basic email is free now.

Non-tech family and friends tend to have <cable-company>.com email addresses, more or less locking them into a specific cable provider.

As for myself, I chose an ISP that I'm pretty sure isn't interested in data mining my correspondence. And I have my own permanent domain name I can move to a different ISP should things change. I pay a small monthly fee, but it is mainly for my web site with an email account included. A small price I don't mind paying for basically total control over these things. I'd do it with my own server, but all cable companies in this area block incoming port 80 and probably others unless you buy an expensive "business" account for far more than I pay for the web site ISP.

Comment Re:Great firefighters (Score 4, Informative) 243

Did you read the guide at all?

Warning: Regardless of the disabling procedure you use, ALWAYS ASSUME THAT ALL HIGH VOLTAGE COMPONENTS ARE ENERGIZED! Cutting, crushing, or touching high voltage components can result in serious injury or death.

I'm guessing reading is hard for you

On p. 14, "Cutting the front trunk first responder loop", it shows how to disable the high voltage. Under the hood there is a coiled loop of red wire with a big bright orange label with a picture of wire cutters. You cut the red wire. This shuts down the high voltage system outside of the high voltage battery itself. For extra safety, you cut a section out of it so it won't reconnect accidentally.

IMO they should put this on the first page. But at least it is there.

Comment Re:linux etc (Score 2) 585

Liberalism ("Progressivism") is precisely what has led to the creation of the US prison state and fomented the spread of fascism in the US. I've personally watched it happening in real-time over the last 5+ decades.

Fuck that's funny. Even more so if you actually believe it.

There hasn't been a progressive Government in the USA for the better part of half a century, and 30-40 years for most of the rest of the western world (a handful of European countries aside, and even they've shifted significantly rightwards).

Right-wing Fascism evolved into right-wing Neoliberalism and it has been running the world since - at the absolute latest - the '80s. So the modern world shouldn't surprise anyone - the political right is the side of royalty, corporations, the church, the military, and other similar hereditary, conformist, strictly hierarchical, stratified, undemocratic organisations.

Comment Re:Reliability (Score 1) 209

You can't (easily and reliably) stretch a RAID across hosts.

Backblaze take a chunk of data and break it up into 20 smaller chunks (17 data + 3 parity) and then spread those 20 chunks across 20 different physical servers. You can't do that with RAID.

It would also reduce the overall load during disk rebuilds as well.

https://www.google.com.au/sear...

Comment Re:Oh noes (Score 4, Interesting) 180

I received one of these emails from Verizon, which for $59.99 "is a great opportunity to enhance your Fios experience with faster Wi-Fi speeds."

It isn't so much the money or speed I worry about as the ability to control the router's advanced settings for server ports, etc. that I have now in the "old" router.

I couldn't find any detailed information about the new router. I am seriously worried that the advanced settings will be dumbed down or made unavailable, so their outsourced customer service won't have to be concerned with technical stuff and thus require less training. Maybe the monthly fee for the old router is a red flag that this is the case, since they may need customer support with more training. I don't want to buy the new router and then be screwed unless I upgrade to an expensive "business" account. I doubt they will let me go back to the old router.

Does anyone know the specs for the new router?

Comment Re:As it's been said... (Score 1) 621

Oh sorry, second after "What does it mean to leave the EU." Thanks for correcting me and strengthening my argument. These people had no fucking clue what just happened the day before.

*sigh*

Here's another explanation.

But the real point is it's an irrelevant and stupid argument. I mean - even if one were to accept that X number of people googling a term a day after a particular event must carry more weight than all the people who might have googled the same term every day before that event - are you seriously trying to argue Google trends should direct how to run a country ?

That's a glib way to hand-wave away any argument.

Your argument is that you can't see any possible positive outcome, therefore it was a bad idea.

Comment Re:As it's been said... (Score 1) 621

Would you think a second vote would be more acceptable if as a condition of holding it, there could be no third vote?

No, I don't think there is any reason to hold a second vote at all.

And it's not deceitful to suggest that they made an informed and well-considered decision when the most popular search query in the UK the following day was "what is the EU"?

no it wasn't.

When the decision was objectively stupid unless you hate the concept of the EU's power more than the trillions in economic damage currently being wrought? The decision to leave is not a decision an informed populace would make for any reason other than an overpowering tantrum of xenophobia and jingoism, which didn't seem to match the public's mood. It was made due to extreme ignorance.

These are religious statements.

Comment Re:As it's been said... (Score 1) 621

Do you think there would be a petition for a third vote if the outcome was the same?

Yes.

I don't think so. It's the same reason you usually don't ask a person if they're sure more than once, and important switches only have only one safety cover on them.

The "safety cover" was weeks of campaigning and years of debate leading up to the referendum.

Do not try to suggest the idea of leaving the EU was sprung upon the people with little warning. It's just deceitful.

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