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Submission + - What The Military Taught Me About DevOps (

An anonymous reader writes: 11 year US Air Force veteran, Chris Short, talks at DevOpsDays Detroit 2016 about what he learned in the military and how it applies to DevOps today

Submission + - lineinfile be damned (

oaf357 writes: The Ansible lineinfile module is designed to search a file for a line, and ensure that it is present or absent. lineinfile is very effective at that particular task. However, when the line has to be in a certain place or before or after a certain line, lineinfile becomes a hassle to manage. Most people on IRC (#ansible) tend to agree, lineinfile is not a very good module in practice. Even Brain Coca says to avoid the lineinfile module. But, there is one use case I have found where line in file really excels.

Submission + - Technical Debt and the Ongoing Battle Against It (

oaf357 writes: I have been trying to fit a lot of square pegs into round holes lately. Eliminating technical debt with modern day DevOps practices to reduce costs is seldom fun or glamorous but is very often beneficial. Reducing costs should be the mindset of IT and one surefire way to do that is to spend the right amount of time on a task to complete it successfully. Finding that balance is definitely tricky especially when a lot of us are human time division multiplexers now. But, that right combination of good work and adequate time spent is definitely out there.

Submission + - What Does Yahoo's Downfall Teach Us? (

oaf357 writes: What does Yahoo's downfall teach us? That you must bring together a great team. The assembled players have to push people to build great features (the content will come, as exemplified by Medium, Snapchat, Facebook, etc.). That team must also do its due diligence in an effort to add value to the company. Now we all get to see how Verizon will deal with Yahoo assuming that deal gets approved, of course.

Comment Re:$14,000 too high? (Score 2, Informative) 575

The Smart "pure" model starts out at "under $12,000" according to their site. Also, to test your theory, I went to and configured a Corolla. Once I added in an automatic transmission and power windows/door locks (which is a $500 option on the Corolla!), my MSRP was $16,325. I would imagine that the Corolla will still be a more popular car -- but it's certainly not cheaper.

Submission + - big ram laptops? (beyond 4gb)

Fubari writes: Anybody know when laptops over 4gb might be coming out? Some of the devtools I want to run are just obscene ram-pigs. On the desktop I'm using now (win2003), it sucks up 1.6gb just to boot. By the time I log in and start doing work, it is stretching 2gb.

Move that to vista, add a vm-ware session or two, and I'm worried I'll be pushing 4gb.

I'm torn between buying a 4gb-max laptop now, or some mini-desktop that can fit in a set of luggage wheels. A friend of mine suggested something like this, but my first choice would be something designed to be portable.
Data Storage

Toshiba Touts 51GB HD DVD 236

srizah writes to mention that Toshiba plans to launch a 51 GB HD DVD, with a 1 GB advantage over Sony's Blu-ray disc. From the article: Toshiba has submitted a triple-layer, 51GB HD DVD-ROM disc to the standard's overseer in the hope the technology will be adopted as a standard by the end of the year. If approved, it allow the format to exceed the 50GB storage capacity of rival medium Blu-ray Disc. The HD DVD standard currently defines single- and dual-layer discs capable of holding 15GB and 30GB of data, respectively."

Submission + - Should a new LAN be entirely wireless?

massysett writes: "I'm in the brand new public library in Rockville, Maryland. Of course there is Wi-Fi for patrons who bring their own laptops. There are also about two dozen Windows PCs throughout to provide catalog and Internet access. I was surprised to notice that all of these public access machines are connected wirelessly, using D-Link expansion cards. The Ethernet jacks on the backs of the machines aren't connected to anything. I'd understand networking the machines wirelessly in an old building, to save the cost of pulling Cat 5. However, this is a brand new building built just for this library, and there is obviously room for cables — the power cords for the computers are coming out of the floors. I would think the low bandwidth of wireless, coupled with the headache of troubleshooting interference and performance issues, would rule out a deploying wireless like this — it's relatively easy to wire a brand new building. I'd also think Cat 5 is more future-proof. Obviously library staff disagreed. How do you think the advantages of wireless would outweigh the disadvantages in a setting such as this?"

It's OK to keep AIMing 305

fooby12 writes "According to the Univeristy of Toronto instant messaging does not hurt the grammar of the people who use it. From the article: "With 80% of Canadian teenagers using instant messaging and adopting its unique linguistic shorthand, many teachers and parents are concerned about the medium's potential to corrupt kids' grammar. But instant messaging doesn't deserve its bad reputation as a spoiler of syntax, suggests a new study from the University of Toronto.""

EMC Buys RSA Security for $2.1B 47

jam244 writes to mention the news of RSA's purchase by EMC. The deal is expected to go through in late third or early fourth quarter of 2006. Once folded into the company, RSA will act as the company's information security division. From the article: "Stice said the proposed price for RSA was 'somewhat expensive,' but added that the deal has the potential to improve EMC's business mix, broaden its product portfolio and further penetrate the consumer security storage market."

Dueling Network Neutrality Commentary on NPR 390

cube farmer writes Wednesday National Public Radio featured a commentary by telecom representative Scott Cleland in opposition to Network Neutrality legislation. Thursday Craig Newmark, the Craig behind craigslist, countered that Network Neutrality is essential for consumers. Who made the stronger case?

The Rise and Fall of Corba 304

ChelleChelle writes "Chief scientist of ZeroC, Michi Henning, has an interesting look at the story behind CORBA a once-promising distributed computing technology. Henning provides more than a brief history, in addition to several reasons pinpointing why CORBA fell short, focusing specifically on the OMG's technology adoption process itself. Most interesting is the final discussion on what we can learn from CORBA's decline, particularly in reference to web services."

Study Says Coffee Protects Against Cirrhosis 261

An anonymous reader writes "Good news for those who like both coffee and alcohol. In a recent study of more than 125,000 people an Oakland, CA medical team found that consuming coffee seems to help protect against alcoholic cirrhosis. The study was done based on people enrolled in a private northern California health care plan between 1978 and 1985." From the article: "People drinking one cup of coffee per day were, on average, 20% less likely to develop alcoholic cirrhosis. For people drinking two or three cups the reduction was 40%, and for those drinking four or more cups of coffee a day the reduction in risk was 80%."

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