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Facebook Is Collaborating With The Israeli Government To Determine What Should Be Censored (go.com) 232

An anonymous reader quotes a report from ABC News: The Israeli government and Facebook agreed to work together to determine how to tackle incitement on the social media network, a senior Israeli Cabinet minister said Monday. The announcement came after two government ministers met top Facebook officials to discuss the matter. The Facebook delegation is in Israel as the government pushes ahead with legislative steps meant to force social networks to rein in content that Israel says incites violence. Israel has argued that a wave of violence with the Palestinians over the past year has been fueled by incitement, much of it spread on social media sites. It has repeatedly said that Facebook should do more to monitor and control the content, raising a host of legal and ethical issues over whether the company is responsible for material posted by its users. Both Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan and Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked, two key figures in Israel's battle against the alleged online provocations, participated in Monday's meeting. Erdan's office said they agreed with Facebook representatives to create teams that would figure out how best to monitor and remove inflammatory content, but did not elaborate further. Erdan and Shaked have proposed legislation that seeks to force social networks to remove content that Israel considers to be incitement. An opposition lawmaker has also proposed a bill seeking to force social networks to self-monitor or face a fine. Facebook said in a statement "online extremism can only be tackled with a strong partnership between policymakers, civil society, academia and companies, and this is true in Israel and around the world." The company did also say that its community standards "make it clear there is non place for terrorists or content that promotes terrorism on Facebook." ABC News reports that "over the past four months Israel submitted 158 requests to Facebook to remove inciting content and another 13 requests to YouTube," according to Shaked. "She said Facebook granted some 95 percent of the requests and YouTube granted 80 percent." All of this adds to the censorship controversy that is currently surrounding Facebook. Last week, Norway's largest newspaper accused Mark Zuckerberg of abusing power after his company decided to censor a historic photograph of the Vietnamese "Napalm Girl," claiming it violated the company's ban on "child nudity."

Comment Free Speech, not Paid speech (Score 1) 193

You have a right to Free Speech, not a right to get paid for it. Youtube could pay a million dollars to each video that literally said that Hitler did nothing wrong, and that would not change Free Speech in the platform. Now, if they started removing comments that didn't say that, then maybe google did forget about do no evil and it went full Nazi, but as long as they are not removing content for its political commentary, or because it upsets its advertisers, there is still Free Speech on the platform.

Have people really become so self entitled that they think they have the right to get paid to say shit on the internet?

Comment Re:Stop using Java (Score 2) 243

The only comparable platform to Java is .NET and if your goal is to avoid money hungry patent/copyright-abusing companies, switching from Java (which has been open source for years) to .NET (partly open source for, what, one year?) is not really a great trade.

And no, dynamically typed languages are not replacements, nor are C/C++. To be a Java competitor you need to match its feature set, which is very hard given how large it is. And you need to be both garbage collected/statically typed. Only Go is even in the right general area, but Go is where Java was around 1998, so that's not really compelling.

The rather boring reality is that Java is safe unless you're an unusually rich corporation who is making something kinda-but-not-really Java. That does not describe most users.

Comment Re:Since when did Apple "rule" smartphones? (Score 1) 214

Apple's outlandish profit margins were largely possible because the US carrier subsidisation model, which is now ending. A huge market wasn't really exposed to the true cost of the hardware. Android's market share over iOS has been massive in most markets around the world where phones were not heavily subsidised, and now the US is coming into line with international norms it seems like Apple will either bleed marketshare or have to lower its margins significantly.

Comment Re:Since 1984 (Score 1) 214

You seem to be skipping over a fairly important detail in that heartwarming story - Apple nearly DID die, in the 1990s, and its turnaround was so incredible it's been studied in microscopic detail by business types the world over. Steve Jobs has movies made about him, this is such a rare and unlikely feat.

Blowing off any criticism or concern about Apple's direction on the grounds that "they didn't die last time" seems to overlook the fact that Jobs is dead and what he did is insanely hard to replicate.

Comment Re:Despicable traitor (Score 1) 72

I suspect you're overlooking a more likely possibility on the grounds that you wouldn't like it - maybe he decided to turn on Tor because he eventually realised he didn't agree with how it was being used or run. A guy with his skills could clearly get well paid work in other fields, after all.

Comment Re:Heh, if only it worked (Score 1) 225

The issue is that for mysterious reasons US banks believe Americans are too dumb to remember their PINs. So American chip cards are unlike the cards used everywhere else in the world, they're "Chip and Signature" rather than "Chip and PIN". Not surprisingly, this unique mode of operation causes interop issues because it's never been tested at scale before.

Comment Re:Lots of places in the US support NFC payments. (Score 1) 225

Apple Pay is much worse than the NFC payments the rest of the world uses.

1) You need an iPhone. Apple's marketshare outside of English speaking countries isn't that high.

2) You need batteries. NFC credit cards don't.

3) An iPhone is physically much larger than a card.

4) Apple Pay has to be initialised by putting in your card details, which makes it perfect for washing stolen CC#s. NFC cards are sent to you straight from the bank, so, there's no intermediate fraud-prone step.

Comment Re:Inertia (Score 1) 225

One of the first countries to roll out EMV was the UK, where there were plenty of magstripe cards.

Try again. I'll give you a hint. The real reason is that in the USA Visa is an ordinary company, whereas in the rest of the world it was owned by the banks. In one setup there is incentive to fix things. In the other, not so much.

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