Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Get HideMyAss! VPN, PC Mag's Top 10 VPNs of 2016 for 55% off for a Limited Time ×

Comment Project governance (Score 1) 281

Do you know of any project governance models that are 'known good' other than BDFL? It seems to me like 'caring' is the key to project success - and the BDFL him/herself, presumably, cares a great deal and inspires others to care a great deal. I've always wondered whether this known good level of success could be achieved with some modicum of democracy or in a project that is part of a larger project (and the project manager is appointed from above rather than self-selected). I've heard some good things about Apple's DRI or directly responsible individual, but it doesn't seem like other groups have had as much success implementing it, which makes me wonder about the method. By the way, thank you for all your work on Perl - it has brought me great fortune.

Comment Re:Yawn... (Score 1) 226

Yes, excellent read. It's rather long, though, so here's the vital part in relation to this discussion:

What happened, though, is that big government opposition to WikiLeaks’s work – which continues – became confused, not least in Assange’s mind, with the rape accusations against him. It has been a fatal conflation. There’s a distinct lack of clarity in Julian’s approach, a lack that is, I’m afraid, only reinforced by the people he has working with him. Only today, he sent me an email – hearing I was writing this piece – telling me it was illegal for me to speak out without what he called ‘appropriate consultation’ with him. He wrote of his precarious situation and of the FBI investigation into his activities. ‘I have been detained,’ he said, ‘without charge, for 1000 days.’ And there it is, the old conflation, implying that his detention is to do with his work against secret-keepers in America. It is not. He was detained at Ellingham Hall while appealing against a request to extradite him to Sweden to answer questions relating to two rape allegations. A man who conflates such truths loses his moral authority right there: I tried to spell this out to him while writing the book, but he wouldn’t listen, sometimes suggesting I was naive not to consider the rape allegations to have been a ‘honey trap’ set by dark foreign forces, or that the Swedes were merely keen to extradite him to America. Because he has no ability to see through other people’s eyes he can’t see how dishonest this conflation seems even to supporters such as me. It was a trap he built for himself when he refused to go to Sweden and instead went into the embassy of a nation not famous for its respect for freedom of speech. He will always have an answer to these points. But there is no real answer. He made a massive tactical error in not going to Sweden to clear his name.

Slashdot Top Deals

Some people have a great ambition: to build something that will last, at least until they've finished building it.

Working...