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Submission + - Here's how a hacker is shaking down a medical clinic (bankinfosecurity.com)

SpacemanukBEJY.53u writes: A hacker going by the nickname The Dark Lord is threatening to release nearly 48,000 medical records unless an orthopedic clinic in the U.S. pays $165,000 by July 8. The batch of data is one of three lots he's stolen from health care clinics that are now advertised on The Real Deal underground market. If the data is accurate, this particular clinic has no good options, a dilemma faced by organizations confronted with extortion attempts by cybercriminals. It's an unsettling tale. The hacker sent a highly personal ransom letter to the clinic's director, including the names of his family members and their Social Security Numbers. "I do not feel bad or guilty about any of this," the hacker says.

Submission + - Xbox Fitness users will soon lose access to workout videos they bought (arstechnica.com)

insitus writes: Xbox users who purchased training videos through the Xbox Fitness app probably thought they were buying a workout program they'd be able to use regularly for the life of the Xbox One, at the very least. Instead, those videos will soon be completely unavailable to those who paid for them up front, according to a "sunset" plan announced by Microsoft yesterday evening.

Submission + - Clinton wants to 'staple' green cards on STEM diplomas (computerworld.com)

dcblogs writes: As president, Hillary Clinton will support automatic green cards, or permanent residency, for foreign students who earn advanced STEM degrees. Clinton, the presumptive Democratic presidential candidate, wants the U.S. to “staple” green cards on the diplomas of STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) masters and PhD graduates “from accredited institutions.” Clinton outlined her plan in a broader tech policy agenda released today. Clinton's “staple” idea isn’t a new. It’s what Mitt Romney, the GOP presidential candidate in 2012, supported. It has had bipartisan support in Congress. But the staple idea is controversial. Critics will say this provision will be hard to control, will foster age discrimination, and put pressure on IT wages.

Submission + - How Sony, Microsoft, and Other Gadget Makers Violate Federal Warranty Law (vice.com)

citadrianne writes: There are big “no trespassing” signs affixed to most of our electronics.

If you own a gaming console, laptop, or computer, it’s likely you’ve seen one of these warnings in the form of a sticker placed over a screw or a seam: “Warranty void if removed.”

In addition, big manufacturers such as Sony, Microsoft, and Apple explicitly note or imply in their official agreements that their year-long manufacturer warranties—which entitle you to a replacement or repair if your device is defective—are void if consumers attempt to repair their gadgets or take them to a third party repair professional.
What almost no one knows is that these stickers and clauses are illegal under a federal law passed in 1975 called the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act.

To be clear, federal law says you can open your electronics without voiding the warranty, regardless of what the language of that warranty says.

Submission + - Physicists Confirm A Pear-Shaped Nucleus, And It Could Ruin Time Travel Forever (sciencealert.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Physicists have confirmed the existence of pear-shaped nuclei, which challenges the fundamental theories of physics that explain our Universe. "We've found these nuclei literally point towards a direction in space. This relates to a direction in time, providing there's a well-defined direction in time and we will always travel from past to present," Marcus Scheck from the University of the West of Scotland told Kenneth MacDonald at BBC News. Until recently, it was generally accepted that nuclei of atoms could only be one of three shapes: spherical, discus, or rugby ball. The first discovery of a pear-shaped nucleus was back in 2013, when physicists at CERN discovered isotope Radium-224. Now, that find has been confirmed by a second study, which shows that the nucleus of the isotope Barium-144 is too asymmetrical and pear-shaped. In regards to time travel, Scheck says that this uneven distribution of mass and charge caused Barium-144's nuclear to "point" in a certain direction in spacetime, and this bias could explain why time seems to only want to go from past to present, and not backwards, even if the laws of physics don't care which way it goes.

Comment Re:"Religious Hacker"? (Score 1) 161

Hmmm, we have the words "Moroccan," "Quran," "religious," "pro-Palestine" . . . something seems to be missing ..

I'm not
Sure if something was
Left out of the story.
All I know is something seems to be
Missing from the discussion.

I wonder if there is a reason for the abstraction and missing element? I'm pretty sure if the hacker was Christian that would have been mentioned.

Must be some of
Us who
See what's happening.
It's all the time,

Submission + - Laid-Off Americans, Required to Zip Lips on Way Out, Grow Bolder (nytimes.com)

Indigo writes: New York Times: American corporations are under new scrutiny from federal lawmakers after well-publicized episodes in which the companies laid off American workers and gave the jobs to foreigners on temporary visas.

But while corporate executives have been outspoken in defending their labor practices before Congress and the public, the American workers who lost jobs to global outsourcing companies have been largely silent.

Until recently. Now some of the workers who were displaced are starting to speak out, despite severance agreements prohibiting them from criticizing their former employers.

Submission + - Intel Announces Xeon E7 v4 Processors Supporting Up To 24TB Of Memory, 8 Sockets (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: Intel recently unveiled their new top-end server chip offering, dubbed Xeon E7 v4, which leverages their Broadwell-EX architecture for mission-critical server applications, big data analytics, and the cloud. Servers with Intel Xeon Processor E7 v4 series processors can support up to 24TB of memory (3TB per socket), which is double the previous generation. The chips also support up to 8 sockets in a single system and are drop-in compatible with existing Brickland-based platforms, after a BIOS / microcode update. In most segments, Xeon Processor E7 v4 series processors typically feature more cores and cache than their previous-generation counterparts, and occasionally higher clocks as well. Xeon E7 v4 series processors with up to 24 physical cores (48 threads) and 60MB of cache will be available.In a 4-socket Brickland-based server powered by a quartet of E7-8890s, in comparison to last year's Xeon E7 v3 series parts, the new Xeon E7 v4 series is an average of about 30% faster across the board. SPECvirt-DC 2013 shows the largest gain of about 35%, while SPECfp shown an uplift of 19%.

Submission + - DEA wants access to medical records — without warrant (thedailybeast.com)

mi writes: Unlike in cases of commerically-held data, where the Third Party doctrine allows police warrantless access, prescription drug monitoring databases are maintained by state-governments.

The difference is lost to the Obama Administration, which argues that "since the records have already been submitted to a third party (a state's PDMP) that patients no longer enjoy an expectation of privacy."

The DEA has claimed for years that under federal law it has the authority to access the states' prescription drug databases using only an “administrative subpoena.” These are unilaterally issued orders that do not require a showing of probable cause before a court, like what’s required to obtain a warrant.

Some states — like Oregon — fight it, some — like Wisconsin — do not.

The federal government is eager to see all these databases linked. The Department of Justice has developed a software platform to facilitate sharing among all state PDMPs. So far 32 states already share their PDMP data through a National Association of Boards of Pharmacy program.

The Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA), which passed Congress in March, calls for expanding sharing of PDMDBs.

Submission + - Senate bill would let FBI read your emails without a court order (cnet.com)

SonicSpike writes: The Senate Intelligence Committee last week approved a bill that would make it easier for the government to read what you're writing online.

The 2017 Intelligence Authorization Act, if enacted into law, would let the FBI obtain email records without a court order. All the agency would need is a National Security Letter, which lets the FBI get information from companies about their customers without alerting the person being investigated. Currently, the FBI can access phone records that way, but not emails.

The bill is the latest move by the federal government to shore up its powers when it comes to surveilling citizens. The government has been battling Apple and other tech companies for more access to data stored on devices. Law enforcement argues it can't fight crimes unless it has access to information on mobile gadgets. Technology companies and rights groups argue that features like strong encryption, which scrambles data so it can be read only by the intended recipient, are needed to keep people safe and protect privacy.

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr (R-NC) and Vice Chairman Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) said Tuesday in a joint statement that the 2017 Intelligence Authorization Act makes it easier for the government to keep Americans safe.

Hardware Hacking

iFixit Moves Into Console Repair 75

sk8pmp writes with news that iFixit, a website known for Apple gadget teardowns and repair guides, is expanding into the game console market, launching a series of troubleshooting and repair guides to help gamers fix their own machines. They're also starting to sell replacement parts and the tools necessary to work on them. "Right now there are repair guides for 24 gaming consoles, including 206 repairs and upgrades. Some of these fixes deal with major issues, such as the infamous Red Ring of Death from the Xbox 360, but others are simpler. For instance, right now there is no easy way to clean out the fans inside your console. 'I think this is probably the number one cause of overheating these days now that manufacturers have mostly gotten their act together,' Wiens said. 'This is routine maintenance, and it's mind-boggling that the manufacturers don't provide people with an easy way to open the case up and blow it out.' You'll also learn how to replace broken LCD screens on your portables, replace the motherboard on your PlayStation 3, and do just about anything else you might want to do to these systems, from the simple to the harrowing."

Medieval Copy Protection 226

An anonymous reader writes "In medieval times a 'book curse' was often included on the inside cover or on the last leaf of a manuscripts, warning away anyone who might do the book some harm. Here's a particularly pretty one from Yale's Beinecke MS 214: 'In the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit, Amen. In the one thousand two hundred twenty-ninth year from the incarnation of our Lord, Peter, of all monks the least significant, gave this book to the [Benedictine monastery of the] most blessed martyr, St. Quentin. If anyone should steal it, let him know that on the Day of Judgment the most sainted martyr himself will be the accuser against him before the face of our Lord Jesus Christ.'"

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