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Submission + - RSA: Ban On Booth Babes Has Been No Big Deal (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: In March 2015, RSA Conference organizers made news by contractually insisting that vendors pitch their security wares without the help of “booth babes,” a first such ban for the technology industry. Next week’s event will be third under the new rules. With the use of "booth babes" long a source of contention – and some would say embarrassment – implementation of the ban has gone smoothly, according to RSA. “Overall I would say this has been received well by our exhibitors. Several have thanked us for having a policy.”

Submission + - Technology On Day One For Obama Was A World Apart (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: Eight years isn’t a long time, yet so much has changed on the technology and social-media landscape between when Barack Obama took the oath on Jan. 20, 2009 and Donald Trump does Friday. The big tech story around Obama’s inauguration was whether he’d get to keep his cherished Blackberry. The iPhone was only in its second generation and Apple’s App Store was a newborn. Instagram and Snapchat were a year or two away. Ninety percent of Americans owned dumb phones and cord-cutting was cutting edge. Here’s a look back.

Submission + - Verizon vs. Volunteer Firefighters (and Legere) (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: The Chincoteague Volunteer Fire Company, which serves a tiny island of 3,000 residents off the coast of Virginia, is building a new firehouse on land currently home to crucial Verizon telecommunications equipment that Verizon wants to charge $72,000 to move. After a fire company Facebook post complaining about the bill garnered press attention, T-Mobile CEO and social media showman John Legere inserted himself into the controversy by offering to pick up the tab himself. Besides protecting the island residents, the fire company also shepherds a herd of 150 wild horses, the Chincoteague Ponies, which would appear incidental to the disagreement except for the fact that the fire company says paying Verizon $72,000 would mean it has that much less to care for the animals.

Submission + - Spammers prefer Trump but are losing faith in him (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: Whatever difficulties Donald Trump may be having among other potential voting blocs, he’s far and away the favorite presidential candidate of at least one demographic group: spammers. However, he seems to have lost significant support among that group since peaking in January. This is according to an examination of a year’s worth of spam used by an Arizona company to test anti-spam products.

Submission + - Cisco Blames Router Bug On 'Cosmic Radiation' (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: A Cisco bug report addressing “partial data traffic loss” on the company’s ASR 9000 Series routers contends that a “possible trigger is cosmic radiation causing SEU soft errors.” Not everyone is buying: “It IS possible for bits to be flipped in memory by stray background radiation. However it's mostly impossible to detect the reason as to WHERE or WHEN this happens,” writes a Redditor identifying himself as a former Cisco engineer. As for Cisco, the company says it can’t confirm this particular instance of cosmic meddling, but contends that it is certainly possible and is a problem they’ve been working on since 2001.

Submission + - Why Belgium leads in IPv6 adoption (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: Every time you read a story devoted to worldwide IPv6 adoption rates, sitting atop the list of highest achievers is Belgium, otherwise better known for chocolate, waffles, beer and diamonds. Google, for example, has worldwide IPv6 adoption at about 12%, Belgium leading at 45%. Why Belgium? Eric Vyncke, co-chair of Belgium’s IPv6 Council, explains a unique set of circumstances involving technology, geography, politics and culture.

Submission + - Plea to Cisco: Fix CCIE written exam (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: Tom Hollingsworth, a CCIE and author of a blog called “The Networking Nerd,” has issued a blistering critique of Cisco’s CCIE routing and switching written exam. “The discontent is palpable,” according to Hollingsworth, writing from last week’s Cisco Live conference. “From what I’ve heard around Las Vegas this week, it’s time to fix the CCIE Written Exam.” Cisco’s response: “We are always open to feedback and looking for ways to improve and evolve our programs so they remain at the forefront of the industry."

Submission + - Can tech workers skip the Olympics as easily as athletes? (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: Golfer Jordan Spieth announced this morning that he will not play in the Olympics, citing Zika, meaning the world’s top four players in his sport have now opted out of going to Brazil. They’re self-employed and answer to no one. But what of the rank-and-file employees who work for major technology companies sending large contingents to Brazil? Are they being asked – or compelled — to ignore the risks? Conversely, could women of child-bearing age be denied the opportunity to go at an employer’s discretion? Major vendors like Cisco and GE say they’re not making anyone go, though at least one expert says that doing so wouldn’t necessarily be a violation of employment law.

Submission + - Comodo trying to 'improperly' trademark Let's Encrypt (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: Let’s Encrypt, a free certificate authority launched by the Internet Security Research Group in November 2014 and backed by some of the biggest names in the industry, today revealed that rival CA Comodo is attempting to “improperly” trademark the Let’s Encrypt brand.

Submission + - SPAM: Verizon strike taking toll on business customers

netbuzz writes: With the Verizon strike now in its fourth week, frustrations born of service delays and cancelations remain primarily the bane of consumers, although business customers are also taking on collateral damage, some of which may not be visible to the untrained eye. “Customers are asking their Verizon (Enterprise) account teams for, you name it – an inventory of current services, a next response to a bid for new services, a network management request that can’t otherwise be handled automatically – and the answer is coming back very frequently that those people aren’t around right now so you’re going to have to wait,” says one industry consultant.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - AMC drops 'texting friendly' theaters idea (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: Stung by a ferocious backlash on social media, AMC Entertainment this morning took to Twitter itself to announce that it will not be experimenting with “texting friendly” movie theaters, a trial balloon floated only days ago by the company’s boss. “NO TEXTING AT AMC. Won't happen. You spoke. We listened,” the company said.

Submission + - FCC levies record $51M fine for Lifeline abuse (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: Detailing a litany of abuses, the FCC on Thursday said it will fine wireless provider Total Call Mobile some $51 million for allegedly creating tens of thousands of phony Lifeline accounts that defrauded the Universal Service Fund of almost $10 million. Derided by critics as a giveaway of “free Obama phones,” the Lifeline program is intended to provide essential communications services to low-income individuals but has been plagued by fraud. The $51 million fine would be the largest against a Lifeline provider, according to the FCC.

Submission + - 'Did Google Kill a Donkey?' (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: Google is well known for killing off myriad products and services that the company deems no longer worth its time and money. However, if you type “Did Google kill ” into the company’s search box, the first option offered by autocomplete reads “Did Google kill a donkey.” Google has never had a product named donkey, to the best of our knowledge, so what’s up with the killer question? The answer involves Street View and what Google said in 2013 was simply a photographic misunderstanding.

Submission + - Authorities reportedly question McAfee's ex-girlfriend (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: While antivirus software pioneer John McAfee is in the media spotlight here for his long-shot Libertarian presidential run, law enforcement authorities in Belize and the FBI have just this week reportedly questioned one of his ex-girlfriend’s as they continue to investigate the 2012 murder of McAfee’s American neighbor. That probe prompted McAfee to flee Belize and eventually land back in the United States. McAfee has steadfastly denied any involvement in the murder.

Submission + - Networking pros: iPads don't cut it on service calls (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: AT&T service technicians toting company-issued iPads instead of the laptops they once carried are ill-equipped to solve some customer problems, according to IT professionals criticizing what they say has been a wholesale switch to tablets. “The tech arrived to promptly inform us that he only had an iPad. Which has no Ethernet jack. The tech said it was company policy that they will all be issued a tablet for all field work.” AT&T has yet to comment.

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