Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Trust the World's Fastest VPN with Your Internet Security & Freedom - A Lifetime Subscription of PureVPN at 88% off. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. ×

Comment Re:Troll? (Score 3, Insightful) 267

Globalization is causing the lowering of wages, and it won't stop until the poorest country becomes as rich as the richest one. Economists say that it's a good thing and that it can't be stopped, and the average slashdot reader does too, at least as long as it's not his job sector that gets affected.

Comment Re:Let's all have a good laugh at Rudy's tech secu (Score 1) 280

Call me if he starts trying to run an email server to pass classified infomartion to skirt federal record keeping rules on that same box, THEN you might have a story.

You mean if he inappropriately revealed classified information, like worthless piece of shit Trump's national security advisor Michael Flynn?

Comment Re:Random aspersions (Score 1) 280

For contrast, note that Bush appointed a crony as head of FEMA who completely fell on his face during Katrina, and Obama appointed Caroline Kennedy as ambassador to Japan, who was completely outmastered in our recent Japanese treaty negotiations(*).

So, Bush and Obama were both shitty Presidents. I think that has been firmly established. Should we just give worthless piece of shit Trump a pass since the other Presidents were shitty, too?

Privacy

Britain Has Passed the 'Most Extreme Surveillance Law Ever Passed in a Democracy' (zdnet.com) 359

Zack Whittaker, reporting for ZDNet: The UK has just passed a massive expansion in surveillance powers, which critics have called "terrifying" and "dangerous." The new law, dubbed the "snoopers' charter," was introduced by then-home secretary Theresa May in 2012, and took two attempts to get passed into law following breakdowns in the previous coalition government. Four years and a general election later -- May is now prime minister -- the bill was finalized and passed on Wednesday by both parliamentary houses. Civil liberties groups have long criticized the bill, with some arguing that the law will let the UK government "document everything we do online." It's no wonder, because it basically does. The law will force internet providers to record every internet customer's top-level web history in real-time for up to a year, which can be accessed by numerous government departments; force companies to decrypt data on demand -- though the government has never been that clear on exactly how it forces foreign firms to do that that; and even disclose any new security features in products before they launch. Not only that, the law also gives the intelligence agencies the power to hack into computers and devices of citizens (known as equipment interference), although some protected professions -- such as journalists and medical staff -- are layered with marginally better protections. In other words, it's the "most extreme surveillance law ever passed in a democracy," according to Jim Killock, director of the Open Rights Group.

Comment Re:FX Pro on apple.... (Score 4, Interesting) 259

You don't. If you watch the video (click on the "here" link at the end of the summary) he makes it clear that he's comparing time to get to an end result. Not hardware. The complete package. Hardware + software.

He's not comparing hardware and software to get an end result. He's comparing hardware and software to get two different end results (running two different programs, arbitrarily chosen). Hence the comparison does not make any sense whatsoever. Different programs take different time to run on different computers and you can't infer anything from that.

He then goes further on, providing an explanation (that the macbook pro is faster because it is more "optimized") without any proof (he didn't actually indicate what optimization is there on the mac and isn't there on the pc) for a fact that he didn't measure in the first place (that the macbook pro is faster).

This video makes as much sense as buying a 2016 macbook pro.

Comment Re:clarification (Score 1) 208

It is widely known that the USSR invaded Czechoslovakia because they wanted to keep it under their influence. My sentence was meant as a parody of the Soviet propaganda, which justified violations of the sovereignty of the countries of the Eastern block with the alleged threat of a fascist invader from the West. The Berlin wall, for instance, was called something like "anti-fascist protection barrier" from their side.

Comment Re:clarification (Score 2) 208

I didn't say that the methods were the same, I said that the intentions were. Of course living under the protection of the USA was far better than living under the protection of the USSR. But this doesn't change the fact that altruism was the last thought in the mind of political leaders when they partitioned Europe after WW2. As for the feelings of the common people, the average person from the streets of Russia will genuinely think that their troops have to be deployed abroad in order to altruistically defend other countries from fascist aggressions, in the same way as Americans might genuinely think that Europe is made up of lazy people who need to be altruistically defended by US forces which, as a result, have the right not to clean any mess they make in the process.

And let's be honest, the US never spent less on welfare because they needed the money to patrol Greenland. They have done so because welfare programs aren't high on the list of priorities of the American electorate.

Slashdot Top Deals

Disc space -- the final frontier!

Working...