Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Rackmonkey (Score 1) 113

I would have given you some points if I could. RackMonkey is really a good solution. Although I don't know if it scales to the point where questioner needs it.

We would have taken this software but there was only one problem. We have several devices (like e.g. firewalls) which are only "1/2 U". Meaning we have two devices next to each other. And this could not be represented at the time when we evaluated the software.

Comment Re:wrong on several counts... (Score 1) 298

Since when is it possible to have an Active/Active cluster? Definitely not with Microsoft Cluster Server from Microsoft 2003:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Cluster_Server

And as I wrote in my article I am only writing about this one. And I was not talking about "Windows Compute Cluster Server 2003" or the NLB feature.

And about the vmware solution: He could create a snapshot of the running vm then copy the disk file(s) over to the other server and then delete the snapshot again. This whole process can be scripted with perl and RCLI. He only needs two ESXi servers for this. And they can be downloaded for free. It is definitely not the best solutions but one that would work.

And yes, your solution is probably the best one for his problem.

Comment Re:Some information about HA (Score 2, Informative) 298

True, sorry I did not write it that clear. I was only writing about the Cluster software included with Windows. Not about other applications like NLB included with Windows too.

I just wanted to make clear that Microsoft Cluster Server is a lot easier to set-up (what the questioner has seen correctly) but this is because you get a lot less. He would have to install and configure several other applications (like NLB) to get the same as he gets with Linux HA.

Comment Some information about HA (Score 3, Informative) 298

I want to give you some more information. Based on your visitor estimates I think you do not have a lot of knowledge about it. Because for this number of visitors you do not really need a cluster.

But now to the other stuff. Yes, Windows clustering is (up to Win Server 2003 [1]) a lot easier. But this is because it is not really a cluster. The only thing you can do is having the software running on one server, then you stop it and start it on the new server. This is what Windows Cluster is doing for you. But you can not have the software running on both servers at the same time.

If you really want to have a cluster then you need probably some sort of shared storage (FibreChannel, iSCSI, etc.). Or you are going to use something like DRDB [2]. You will need something like this too if you want to have a real cluster on Windows.

I recommend you to read some more on the Linux HA website [3]. Then you get a better idea what components (shared storage, load balancer, etc.) you will need within your cluster.

If you only want high availability and not load balancing then I recommend you to not use Windows Cluster. Better set-up two VMware servers with one virtual machine and then copy a snapshot of your virtual machine every few hours over to the second machine.

[1] I don't know about Win Server 2008
[2] http://www.drbd.org/
[3] http://www.linux-ha.org/

Comment Re:Support Incident Tracker (Score 1) 321

I can only recommend this one too... I have to evaluate a new trouble ticket system last week. And of all the open source products I found this one was the best.

We had OTRS before. OTRS is very good too, but really hard to install.

A friend is using RT. Now with the newest version the user interface looks really good too. And I think many problems mentioned by others are gone.

Teleportation — Fact and Fiction 348

jcatcw writes "Earlier this week actor Hayden Christensen, of Star Wars fame, and director Doug Liman discussed teleportation with MIT professors to compare the reality to the special effects version in the upcoming movie, Jumper. Edward Farhi, director of the Center for Theoretical Physics at MIT, said, 'It's a little less exotic than what you see in the movie. Teleportation has been done, moving a single proton over two miles. [But] teleporting a person? That is pretty far down the line. The quantum state of a living creature is pretty formidable. That is just not in the foreseeable future.'"
Databases

MapReduce — a Major Step Backwards? 157

The Database Column has an interesting, if negative, look at MapReduce and what it means for the database community. MapReduce is a software framework developed by Google to handle parallel computations over large data sets on cheap or unreliable clusters of computers. "As both educators and researchers, we are amazed at the hype that the MapReduce proponents have spread about how it represents a paradigm shift in the development of scalable, data-intensive applications. MapReduce may be a good idea for writing certain types of general-purpose computations, but to the database community, it is: a giant step backward in the programming paradigm for large-scale data intensive applications; a sub-optimal implementation, in that it uses brute force instead of indexing; not novel at all -- it represents a specific implementation of well known techniques developed nearly 25 years ago; missing most of the features that are routinely included in current DBMS; incompatible with all of the tools DBMS users have come to depend on."
Operating Systems

Submission + - MikeOS 1.0 And OS Writing Guide Released

M-Saunders writes: Fancy writing your own OS? The first official version of MikeOS has been released. It's a 16-bit PC OS written in assembly, released under a BSD-like license. It boots from floppy or CD, has 30+ system calls and features basic DOS .COM program compatibility. Moreover, it's designed to teach to teach basic OS design and x86 assembly language, and the new Handbook includes a whole section on writing your own OS. Sure, you wouldn't write an OS in 16-bit asm today, but hopefully it's a useful starting point for novices.
Software

Submission + - OSAF released version 0.7 of Chandler (chandlerproject.org)

modir writes: A few days back OSAF released new versions of the Chandler Client and the Chandler Server (formally known as Cosmo). A full list of changes and new features can be found in the Release Notes. OSAF was started in 2001 by Mitch Kapor (the creator of Lotus Agenda) with the intention to create a PIM application targeted at knowledge workers.

Feed Greenhouse Gases Bedevil China (wired.com)

Although concerned about global warming, the Chinese say they lack both the money and technology to get their greenhouse gas emissions under control. By the Associated Press.


It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - The most politically incorrect games ever

The Bike Blog writes: "These are two of the most politically dangerous board games ever. In the first you play as either a superpower or terrorist organisation, and compete for world power. In the second you compete either as evolution or intelligent design. "This game didn't happen by accident," the creator said in a statement. "It was intelligently designed.""
Google

Submission + - Google Docs to support Powerpoint

KindredHyperion writes: "Garett Rogers at ZDNet has an article on the prospect of a Powerpoint-esque addition to Google Docs and Spreadsheets. From the article: "If you dig around the language files in Google Docs, you will find what appears to be traces of a new service preparing for launch soon. Meet Google Presently — an online presentation creator that will likely read and write the most common formats like Microsoft PowerPoint and Open Office Impress.""

Slashdot Top Deals

I have a very small mind and must live with it. -- E. Dijkstra

Working...