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Comment Why does a package manager have a CTO? (Score 1) 480

To fix the internet, Laurie Voss, CTO and cofounder of NPM, took the "unprecedented" step of restoring the unpublished left-pad 0.0.3 that apps required.

Wait, what? A package manager has a CTO? Why is there a SPF in the Javascript world? In the Java world, you would just add an additional repository to your Maven pom.xml and move on. (Or even better, you would already have had your own Artifactory listed, with all your required libraries mirrored there.)

Comment Generational math illiteracy (Score 1) 908

Sure, teach statistics before Calculus. But the reason students struggle in math is the teachers themselves do not know math. There is an illiteracy in math that is handed down generation to generation, analogous to the language illiteracy in the descendants of American slaves that is handed down generation to generation (stemming from when it was made illegal to teach blacks how to read and write). Math, including Algebra II and Geometry, teach logical thinking, something that is sorely lacking and that is greatly needed in today's culture which is soaked in misleading media on the one hand and marked by rapid changes in technology and culture on the other, both of which requiring critical and logical thinking to sort it out and to not get led astray by fads and lies.

Comment Lost generation (Score 1) 605

Yes, percentages mask two big factors: generational bias and the basket of goods. With the number of good-paying jobs shrinking due to globalization and automation, the few remaining jobs are going to Boomers and GenX'ers who have experience, shutting out GenY/Millennials and GenZ. At the same time, the basket of goods those younger generations are facing is skewed due to college tuition outpacing average inflation.

Thus the younger generations are facing the double whammy of fewer jobs and a basket more expensive than average. This has led to the term

Comment Inflation calculation (Score 5, Insightful) 605

50% rise in eight years? That's only 1.5^0.125 = 5.2%/year. That's less than the rise in college tuition. For the extremes of the range, there is the ridiculously low CPI of 10% over eight years and the ridiculously high of 100% over eight years (view page source to see the hidden value). The geometric mean of those two extremes is sqrt(1.1*2.0)=48%.

Maybe 50% over eight years (5.2%/year) is in fact overstating actual inflation, but it's far from self-evident. By just stating the number and expecting people to be shocked, Mark O'Neill is, intentionally or not, advancing the wage-suppression-through-inflation scam.

Comment Model omits authoritativeness, reach of source (Score 2) 303

His model is way too weak.

We further assume that a leak of information from any conspirator is sufficient to expose the conspiracy and render it redundant

So any single person acting alone, of any stature in society, can bust open a conspiracy and get it on CNN?

The problems with this model are many:

1. It ignores authority and credibility of the leaker

2. It ignores the reach of the leaker

3. It does not define when a conspiracy theory has been proven (e.g. a reasonable definition is whether a specified percentage of the population understand the conspiracy to be true)

For example, to use one of the examples of a true conspiracy the author used, the NSA:

The National Security Agency (NSA) PRISM affair—The staggering extent of spying by the NSA and its allies on civilian internet users was exposed by contractor Edward Snowden in 2013.

That's just factually wrong. It was substantially exposed on PBS in 2007. Why am I quoting PBS? Because I know it is perceived as an authoritative source. Why do most people not know about this? Because PBS lacks the reach.

Both authoratativeness and reach are required to expose a conspiracy. And once these two elements are added into the model, then one is forced to accept a non-trivial definition of conspiracy-proven-true by setting a threshold of population who believes (and not simply saying one leaker implies the whole world instantaneously and fully believes).

Comment Red Herring; real threat is detainment (Score 2) 235

The Trolley Problem is a red herring that distracts from the real danger: government remote-controlled detainment of political opponents, as depicted in Minority Report. Plus, any number of variations: script-kiddies hacking, drug cartel kidnapping, kidnapping/trafficking of women/children, murder-for-hire (drive off cliff), nation-state espionage and assassination. When major crimes, and not just credit card scams, become available to the push of a button, the risk threshold to the criminal is lowered for heinous crimes.

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