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Comment What're They Hiding? (Score 2) 35

Rumor has been, as the summary says, that the NX will be a console/handheld hybrid. However, that's not a particularly novel idea, as it's basically what the Nvidia SHIELD is, and I thought up the idea years ago thinking it obvious. Nintendo said they didn't want to reveal what their system was too early, since they didn't want to be copied by competitors.

I don't blame them much, given that Sony and Microsoft jumped on the motion-control bandwagon after the success of the Wii... but being coy doesn't give them any additional lead time. If Sony/Microsoft believe the rumors, and want to do what Nintendo is doing because it'll surely lead to success (not a guarantee given the Wii U), then they could start designing a hybrid device before the official reveal. If they're going to take a wait-and-see approach to see if this Nintendo idea pans out and has any success, then it doesn't matter how early the concept is revealed. Perhaps Nintendo is aping Apple by being secretive and then having a big reveal shortly (5 months) before it's available for purchase, so that all of their marketing momentum is concentrated within a short span of time. Considering Pokemon is traditionally a handheld series, and if this is a handheld/console hybrid, there could plausibly be a mainline Pokemon game on it. There might be a 3ds-like resolution when portable, and you plug it in to a TV for higher resolution. The console has been in the works so long I don't think it'll have much/any support for 4k.

If they say "Surprise! we were working on self-contained portable VR this whole time! and you can plug it in so the chips increase their clock speed for better graphics. At $299!" then I'll be impressed.

Comment Gundam Flashbacks (Score 1) 275

Citizenship is allowed for those who live on Earth? For a 'space nation'? The vast majority of 'citizens' will be those still living on Earth, until that policy is changed (even with space elevators/habitats). Since those on Earth will be the majority, it's unlikely the policy will be changed so that the majority would disenfranchise themselves. This'll lead to a situation where those in space are living under the rule of those on Earth. There'll inevitably be conflict between how those on Earth think the space nation should conduct itself, and how those actually in space want to do things. Of course, they'll have big, heavy things (like a space colony) they can drop on us. I recommend investing in Gundanium.

Comment Re:Says Hillary Propaganda arm Washington Post (Score 1) 113

I saw you linking those articles the other day, and read the Intercept one. The leak doesn't prove that the entire mainstream media is in bed with Hillary, following her every command. It shows that one journalist would reliably write articles on provided topics about Hillary, and not always in a completely favorable light. It also says that Hillary had an off-the-record get-together with various members of the press, before she announced her bid for the presidency. Probably, the journalists wanted to know if she was actually going to run and what her platform was going to be. They weren't necessarily forming a secret society dedicated to conspiring to create blatantly biased propaganda in favor of Hillary's campaign, and the leak provides no evidence that any such thing happened or was intended. The Intercept article I read also pointed out that McCain did the exact same thing during his presidential campaign, inviting journalists to an off-the-record dinner. Notice that there were no Fox News journalists invited; Hillary's campaign manager probably only invited journalists they already thought would be likely to give her favorable press; the bias existed long before this private dinner.

Comment 1nm Gate Size (Score 3, Insightful) 66

1nm is the gate length, not the size of the entire transistor. Typically-quoted transistor sizes are actually the process nodes, which are half of the distance between the same feature in neighboring transistors, so they're not comparable to a measurement of an individual transistor. That said, I seem to recall a story from over 10 years ago, about someone creating a single 1nm transistor. The trick, now as then, is to use lithography to create billions of them connected to one another to form integrated circuits, and the main limitation in size reductions has been lithography tech rather than transistor tech.

Comment Re:Illegal, Un-Constitutional and MSM fail (Score 1) 50

To be fair, it's Reuters, a newswire agency. They send along facts to other news sources who subscribe to their feed, and let them do the editorializing. Not that they never editorialize on their own site, but they have a "stick to the facts" background. If the Constitution is relevant to the story is up to the editors, apparently.

Comment 1Million People (Score 1) 497

Doing some maths... sending 200 people per trip, and 50 trips, means 10k people sent there. Assuming half are women, and each woman has 5 children, there'd then be 35k people. Assume every 20 years each new generation also has 5 children. It'd take 80 years for the population to reach a population of 977k, minus those who died in those 80 years. That said, why would a million people be needed or even desirable? Large numbers of manual laborers won't be required due to the large amount of advanced machinery that'll be involved in any work occurring on Mars. New tech and heavy automation will be required for nearly everything; Uncle Joe's 200-year-old farming traditions won't cut it. There's also the issue of the large number of people born on Mars having never been to Earth and wanting to go there... and not coming back. They didn't sign up for a dangerous frontier life like their ancestors did, so one can't use the "they volunteered fully knowing the risks" excuse for how dangerous it is.
Sending even 100 people is pointless unless it's been proven that a handful of people can survive there. Experiments have been done in the Arctic, but it's still in some doubt given the different environments.

Comment Externalities (Score 1) 184

The $200k figure is internalized costs; the cost of providing free credit protection to those affected (which almost noone takes them up on), and investigators to figure out what was breached, how, by whom, and to maybe patch the hole they got in through. The externalized amount, the burden on those whose data was stolen, is far greater. Also, one has to keep in mind that most breaches are minor incidents involving insiders; they cost very little to fix (change password: done) and no further spending is necessary or effective; the ones we hear about are mostly the "millions of user account details stolen" incidents caused by external crackers.

Comment Re:It depends (Score 1) 184

Someone would notice even within 72 hours that their database had been encrypted and was inaccessible. You simply restore the database from a backup, after restoring the code. My understanding is that regular 'data backups' only back up the database, and that the software platform that the server runs is backed up to a separate location, only when intentionally modified, and thus less frequently. If the code were modified by a virus, then you'd restore from a version from before the intrusion. If people are constantly updating the code (using more than a WYSIWYG editor) and overwriting code backups, they're likely to notice a cryptolocker virus had attached to their code. Now, if a virus were able to access a code repository and delete/infect/encrypt ALL revisions, then yes you might be screwed. But I haven't heard of any cryptolocker virus doing this.

Comment Milking the Stubborn (Score 3, Insightful) 219

There are many in the older generations who are anti-Internet and are seemingly afraid that if they even sign up for Internet access their bank balance will disappear and their grandchildren will get kidnapped. Others have Internet access but barely use it; you know the ones, they check email or Facebook and maybe one or two other sites and that's it; they don't do web searches or visit new sites regularly.
These are the people who will, most likely, NEVER sign up (on their own) for Netflix or cut the cord, no matter how expensive their cable/satellite bill gets, because as far as they're concerned, there's no alternative. They wouldn't know how to get Netflix on their TV and have no idea how to find out.
So, the pay TV companies are raising rates in order to milk these older generations as much as possible before they die off or figure out how to connect a Roku to their TV (or someone else shows them); or before they buy a smart TV that puts all these cord-cutting options on the screen they're looking at, accessible with the remote they're holding.
The older generations are also set in the "watching what's on" paradigm; while the newer generations have had access to on-demand, home video, and file sharing, allowing for "watching what you want". With Netflix, there is no mindless "watching what's on", you have to choose what to put on, at least a series to autoplay. If you don't like it, you can't claim lack of responsibility a la "these networks air nothing but crap nowadays. yep", it's all on you for putting that show on.

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