Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:If the point was ... (Score 4, Insightful) 317

There's no proof that it has anything to do with Wikileaks, but in a world of IoT devices with no thought toward security, anyone who cares to do so can mount DDOS with the power of a national entity.

What's the point of doing what Assange and Wikileaks have been doing without any moral position? He isn't helping his own case.

Comment Re:Legal? (Score 2) 264

No, of course it is not legal to set a trap to intentionally hurt someone, even if you expect that the trap could only be activated by the person committing property theft or vandalism. Otherwise, you'd see shotguns built into burglar alarms.

Fire alarm stations sometimes shoot a blue dye which is difficult to remove or one which only shows under UV. Never stand in front of one when pulling the lever! But they are not supposed to hurt you.

And of course these booby traps generally are not as reliable as the so-called "inventor" thinks and tend to hurt the innocent.

Comment Re:Snake oil salesman (Score 1) 49

Ha ha. That's a common joke about the security industry. There is some truth to it.

What's great with bug bounty programs is that customers pay for results. You pay for valid and useful vulnerability reports. You don't pay for reports that are not useful. For hackers to make money (and the best ones make a lot of money), they must produce useful and relevant vulnerability reports.

That's a HUGE difference compared to traditional security products and services and it explains why bug bounty programs are becoming so popular. They are much more effective than any other method of finding vulns in live software.

Comment Re:70,000 white hat hackers? (Score 1) 49

Yep, 70,000 is a lot! The number keeps growing, and we hope to get to a million. To serve all companies and government organizations worldwide who will be needing bug bounty programs, we need a lot of excellent hackers.

It should also be noted that it takes a lot of hacking to find even a simple vulnerability. Of the 70,000 hacker accounts we have, about 1 in 6 have filed an actual vulnerability report. To help them get going, we have an ebook on hacking that we give to new hackers. Once new hackers get the hang of bug hunting they can advance fast, earning more and more reputation points. When you sign up at HackerOne, you start at 100 points. Our most prolific hackers have reached 10,000 points. You can do it, too!

Comment Re:Second coming of teams of ethical hackers (Score 1) 49

Yep this is true. It is also a common situation that humanity has dealt with successfully many times. To keep a ship afloat, you must find and fix every hole. Even one hole might sink it. To keep an aircraft safely flying, similarly every safety aspect must be in shape. Shipping and airlines have great safety track record these days.

To keep software secure, you must attempt to fix all serious vulnerabilities. You may never get to 100% vuln-free software, but the closer you get and the faster you can asymptotically move towards that goal, the more you reduce your cybersecurity risk.

Comment Re:Second coming of teams of ethical hackers (Score 2) 49

It has taken decades for the industry to get used to bug bounties. The first one was in 1981. Now it is starting to be very real. HackerOne has already paid out over $10,000 to hackers and researchers around the world. One hacker has made over half a million dollars. Another recently bought an apartment for his mother with the bounty money he had made. Still lots of work and education to do, but it is very much moving in the right direction. An example: the US DoD now committing $7m to vulnerability disclosure programs.

- Marten (HackerOne CEO)

Submission + - Strange New World: Samba Server running on Windows ! ( 1

Jeremy Allison - Sam writes: "Do you know what this is? This is a non-Windows SMB file server running natively on Windows."

"To be more specific, this is a Virtualbox Ubuntu virtual machine running on Windows 10, grabbing a file across SMB from a Samba file server running inside the Windows Subsystem for Linux through Bash."

Comment Re:So, what's Soylent really about? (Score 1) 207

Like Boost, too much simple sugar.

Water, Corn Maltodextrin, Sugar, Blend of Vegetable Oils (Canola, Corn), Milk Protein Concentrate, Soy Protein Isolate, Cocoa Powder (Processed with Alkali). Less than 0.5% of: Nonfat Milk, Magnesium Phosphate, Sodium Citrate, Soy Lecithin, Natural & Artificial Flavor, Calcium Phosphate, Potassium Chloride, Cellulose Gum, Potassium Citrate, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Cellulose Gel, Carrageenan, Salt, Ferric Phosphate, dl-Alpha-Tocopheryl Acetate, Zinc Sulfate, Niacinamide, Manganese Sulfate, Calcium Pantothenate, Copper Sulfate, Thiamine Chloride Hydrochloride, Vitamin A Palmitate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin, Folic Acid, Biotin, Chromium Chloride, Sodium Molybdate, Sodium Selenate, Potassium Iodide, Vitamin B12, Phylloquinone, and Vitamin D3.

Comment Re:So, what's Soylent really about? (Score 1) 207

The closest would be Boost Plus, which still comes in short on calories and way too much simple sugar. Look at the ingredients!

Water, Corn Syrup, Sugar, Vegetable Oil (Canola, High Oleic Sunflower, Corn), Milk, Protein Concentrate, Cocoa Processed with Alkali, and Less than 1% of: Calcium Caseinate, Soy Protein Isolate, Sodium Caseinate, Gum Acacia, Fructooligosaccharides, Potassium Citrate, Inulin (from Chicory), Soy Lecithin, ...

Comment Re:So, what's Soylent really about? (Score 1) 207

First, you're not realizing what I bill those customers. I don't want to wave money around on Slashdot but I assure you, you too would drink an unoffensive bottle of Soylent for that much. The main thing it buys me is freedom, and there is no shortage of pleasure coming from that. I can work on what I want most of the time, or not work, if I just keep a few of those customers.

Second, you can't have any of the real pleasures in life without your health. You are evolved to be attracted to foods that would have been infrequent windfalls throughout most of the evolution of human beings. Now, you can have them for every meal, and your body is sending you the signals to do so despite the fact that those foods will ultimately be detrimental to you. If you are still compelled to eat them, there's a pretty good chance that's the addiction talking.

Comment So, what's Soylent really about? (Score 4, Insightful) 207

I have some customers in San Jose, and live in Berkeley. Given the horrid traffic and the lack of good trains with little hope that BART's Silicon Valley extension will be done within a decade, I get up at 5AM when it's necessary to work at these customer sites, hit the road by 5:30, and head home around 1 PM.

Obviously, that doesn't leave time for a leisurely breakfast. So, a cold bottle of Soylent 2.0 just out of the 'fridge is about my best option while driving. Warm Soylent doesn't actually seem that much worse, and I've used that during long drives when the alternative would have been fast food.

Yes, I get paid enough to compensate for all of this.

Soylent 2.0 tastes OK, but not so good that you'd eat it just for the taste. It takes care of physical needs and doesn't do anything nasty to my gastrointestinal system. I do not attempt to use it as a total food replacement.

Consuming Soylent, though, leads one to think about how food flavors and other characteristics of food are evolved or engineered to manipulate us, and how this is a dependence or addiction and perhaps the largest cause of health issues in our lives.

Slashdot Top Deals

1 1 was a race-horse, 2 2 was 1 2. When 1 1 1 1 race, 2 2 1 1 2.