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Submission + - The Senate let's ISPs to sell your data without your consent (arstechnica.com)

ventsyv writes: The Senate, in it's infinite wisdom, has decided to bar the FCC from enforcing rules that required ISPs to get you to opt-in before selling your data. The resolution passed narrowly on a partisan vote — 50 Republicans voting for it, 48 Democrats against.
If the House approves this and the president signs it, ISPs will be able to sell your browsing history to the highest bidder.

Submission + - SPAM: On Site Computer Repair Service Ann Arbor

An anonymous reader writes: Arbor Computers was started in 2004. The driving forces behind the company has more than 18 years of experience in IT On Site Computer Repair Service Ann Arbor
Link to Original Source

Comment Re:Fake news, see the MASIE data for yourself (Score 0) 186

Climatologists are not mechanical engineers, they are PhD's. I agree, engineers are very careful about the details. However, PhD's don't have life-risk to consider. I fact, there is overt manipulation of the data upon which most (if not all) of the climate "conclusions" are based.

Further, engineers don't have the luxury of being influenced by confirmation biases or other cognitive issues.... because engineering data is wholly-objective and extremely repeatable. "climate science" is neither; the inductive processes they apply seem to lead down paths that would follow confirmation bias, repeatedly. I'm involved in science and a great mentor of mine once said that, "if you torture the data enough, it will tell you anything you want to hear...."

Submission + - Terrifying anti-riot vehicle created to quash any urban disturbance (ibtimes.co.uk)

drunkdrone writes: A formidable remote-controlled anti-riot vehicle called the Bozena Riot has been designed to make light work of angry mobs with a giant expanding shield and packing an arsenal of crowd dispersal tools.

Built by Slovakian company Bozena, the high-tech security system keeps law enforcement units safe with its shock-absorbing barrier, which can be expanded out to 7.5 metres to protect 36 officers and features a rising platform to give riot police an elevated view of their surroundings and provide tactical advantage against aggressors.

The shield has ports for firing non-lethal projectiles and is equipped with tear gas guns to "guarantee control of crowds" when things get dicey. Mounted loudspeakers can be used either to issue instructions to officers or to appeal to crowds, and the vehicle can optionally be equipped with smoke grenade launchers and a radio jammer for blocking mobile communications.

Comment Re:Fake news, see the MASIE data for yourself (Score 1) 186

Mark Serreze is a well-known person in the climate debate community. But the link above is to HIS OWN data which directly contradicts his statements in the NYT article. I'm not attacking him personally, but I have substantive conflict with the way he conveyed the veracity and conclusions about his own data.

Comment Fake news, see the MASIE data for yourself (Score 0, Troll) 186

Actually, the sea ice extent was LOWER in 2006, for NASA's own data. Further, this years ice extent is roughly equivalent to a couple years, over the past decade. What's happening hear is that several thousand people whom rely on the climate change scam, for their paycheck, are ramping up the BS so they can remain on the gravy train.... Here's the graph of the MASIE data.... feel like a real scientist, review it for yourself! https://realclimatescience.com...

Submission + - Why You Should Care About The Supreme Court Case On Toner Cartridges (consumerist.com)

rmdingler writes: A corporate squabble over printer toner cartridges doesn’t sound particularly glamorous, and the phrase “patent exhaustion” is probably already causing your eyes to glaze over. However, these otherwise boring topics are the crux of a Supreme Court case that will answer a question with far-reaching impact for all consumers: Can a company that sold you something use its patent on that product to control how you choose to use after you buy it?

Here’s the background: Lexmark makes printers. Printers need toner in order to print, and Lexmark also happens to sell toner.

Then there’s Impression Products, a third-party company makes and refills toner cartridges for use in printers, including Lexmark’s.

Submission + - Massive Ukraine Munition Depot Blast May Have Been Caused By A Drone (bbc.com)

dryriver writes: The BBC reports that 20,000 people are being evacuated from the immediate area around a munition dump in Ukraine that has gone up in flames. The 350 hectare munition dump near Kharkiv is around 100km (60 miles) from fighting against Russian-backed separatists and was used to supply military units in the conflict zone in nearby Luhansk and Donetsk. A drone was reported to have been used in an earlier attempt to set the facility on fire in December 2015. Authorities are now investigating whether someone possibly flew a drone over the facility that dropped an explosive device that caused the stored munitions to catch fire and explode. Ukrainian authorities believe that the conflagration at the facility is the result of sabotage.

Submission + - Android Trojan Spreads Through Fake Cell Towers

Trailrunner7 writes: Attackers in China are using rogue cell base stations to spread versions of an Android banking Trojan that steals user credentials and has the ability to bypass two-factor authentication.

The malware, known as the Swearing Trojan for some impolite language found in the Chinese code, has been in circulation for several months and uses a number of different methods to spread, including traditional phishing emails and SMS messages. The most sophisticated method, though, is the use of the fake base transceiver stations, which the attackers employ to send SMS messages to victims. The texts appear to come from a Chinese telecom operator and contain a link that will infect the user’s device with the malware.

Submission + - In search for unseen dark matter, physicists turn to shadow realm (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Scientists hunting unseen dark matter are looking deeper into the shadows. With searches for a favored dark matter candidate—weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs)—coming up empty, physicists are now turning to the hypothetical “dark sector”: an entire shadow realm of hidden particles. This week, physicists will meet at the University of Maryland in College Park for a workshop, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to mull ideas for a possible $10 million short-term experiment that would complement the agency’s current WIMP search and other dark-matter efforts. And many researchers believe DOE should focus on the dark sector. Whereas WIMPs would be a single massive particle tacked onto the standard model of known particles, the dark sector would consist of a slew of lighter particles and forces—such as a dark version of electromagnetism—with tenuous connections to known particles. To spot dark-sector particles, physicists will have to rethink their detection techniques, but the new experiment could be small and cheap, physicists say. Still, DOE officials warn that the $10 million isn’t a sure thing.

Submission + - FTC warns on "Can you hear me now" robocall: Just hang up! (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: The Federal Trade Commission this week issued a warning about the irritating and illegal “Can you hear me now?” robocall scam making the rounds on phones across the country. The FTC says it has received hundreds of complaints on the calls which could end up being part of a scam to get your money.

Submission + - SixXS IPv6 Tunnel Provider Shutting Down (sixxs.net)

yakatz writes: SixXS started providing IPv6 tunnels in 1999 to try to break the "chicken-and-egg" problem of IPv6 adoption. After 18 years, the service is shutting down. The cited reasons are: 1. that growth has been stagnant, 2. many ISPs offer IPv6, and 3. some ISPs have told customers that they don't need to provide IPv6 connectivity because the customer can just use a tunnel from SixXS. This last reason in particular made the SixXS team think they are doing more harm than good in the fight for native IPv6, so they will be shutting down on June 6.

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